• The Witcher Megathread
    2,663 replies, posted
[QUOTE=Xion21;28718375]Just recently picked up the North American Enhanced Edition, I seriously love this game! So far, I'm in chapter III, nearly through it, level 22, with a focus on Silver styles, Aard, Igni, Axii, and Strength and Intelligence. The combat is so fun, and the animations are just beautiful, even the running looks natural and smooth, let alone the fighting stances and such. More developers need to put time into animations for characters, I'm looking at you Bethesda.[/QUOTE] But to be fair (from what I've played, which is up to exactly where you are at late Act 3) the pacing is extremely slow, the environment design is mostly uninspired and not very atmospheric/detailed, the non story-critical NPC's all look the same, and the entire game up to that point takes place in one of the ugliest, most visually repetitive RPG cities I've played in. The combat system could really use work too. Creatures deal damage before their animations for example, and the fact that combat consists of you simply clicking once to initiate a combo that Geralt automatically does is rather uninteresting. But it does have really nice animations, good character design (so far), excellent use of moral choice, etc. The story is also not generic which I really appreciate (even if it is extremely slow paced at the point of the game I am at).
It's best to play this in Polish, Its native lanauge <3
[QUOTE=KorJax;28723046]But to be fair (from what I've played, which is up to exactly where you are at late Act 3) the pacing is extremely slow, the environment design is mostly uninspired and not very atmospheric/detailed, the non story-critical NPC's all look the same, and the entire game up to that point takes place in one of the ugliest, most visually repetitive RPG cities I've played in. The combat system could really use work too. Creatures deal damage before their animations for example, and the fact that combat consists of you simply clicking once to initiate a combo that Geralt automatically does is rather uninteresting. But it does have really nice animations, good character design (so far), excellent use of moral choice, etc. The story is also not generic which I really appreciate (even if it is extremely slow paced at the point of the game I am at).[/QUOTE] The pacing is a bit slow I will admit, but I don't find it painfully so. Also, the bit about creatures dealing damage at odd times in their animations is quite annoyingly true. I find Vizima rather nice, due to it's atmosphere instead of it's architecture for the most part. Clicking for combat I find ok, because the combos done are pretty neat, and it starts to feel pretty cool for me, but yes, it could have been done differently for more immersion, so maybe combining the excellent animation and creative combo looks with a more skillful execution system is something to look forward to in The Witcher 2.
[QUOTE=Xion21;28728236]The pacing is a bit slow I will admit, but I don't find it painfully so. Also, the bit about creatures dealing damage at odd times in their animations is quite annoyingly true. I find Vizima rather nice, due to it's atmosphere instead of it's architecture for the most part. Clicking for combat I find ok, because the combos done are pretty neat, and it starts to feel pretty cool for me, but yes, it could have been done differently for more immersion, so maybe combining the excellent animation and creative combo looks with a more skillful execution system is something to look forward to in The Witcher 2.[/QUOTE] I mean none of it was *BAD* it just put me off. I'm kind of a sucker for really awe inspiring locales so being in Vizima the whole time up to where I am puts me off enough to not want to play it, in addition to the plot not really going anywhere at the moment. The good news is Witcher 2 looks like it keeps all the awesome from Witcher 1 and makes all the sore spots much better. Combat looks more interesting, the locales and atmosphere seem really awesome, and I have a feeling the story wont take half the game to build up to anything significant.
[QUOTE=KorJax;28728336]I mean none of it was *BAD* it just put me off. I'm kind of a sucker for really awe inspiring locales so being in Vizima the whole time up to where I am puts me off enough to not want to play it, in addition to the plot not really going anywhere at the moment. The good news is Witcher 2 looks like it keeps all the awesome from Witcher 1 and makes all the sore spots much better. Combat looks more interesting, the locales and atmosphere seem really awesome, and I have a feeling the story wont take half the game to build up to anything significant.[/QUOTE] Really I thought Vizima was one of the better videogame locations I've encountered, I thought it was really well realised, beautiful even, while still being realistic and not whoring cheap graphical effects.
I have to agree I found the Witchers locations if not amazing far better realised than a lot of other RPG's. I found the weakest part of the story to be Chapter 2 where I entirely forgot what the main story was in how convoluted the main quests became in achieving the end goal but it picked up significantly after that. Really hope they have a different voice actor for Dandelion all the others were fine but I found him grating
The swamp cemetery looks awesome. Can't wait till I get there, the darker themed areas really get me going. Oh, and this is my wallpaper for the new computer I built a week ago, been enjoying it tons, so I figured why not get a Witcher background! [media]http://gamebanshee.com/wallpaper/thewitcher/wallpaper17-1024x768.jpg[/media]
I really liked the Witcher 1, but I always hated playing the swamp level. And the 4th chapter (I think), the one where you're in the small village seemed out of place.
My favorite part of the Witcher is probably the incredible lore. They have little myths to explain why all of the creatures exist instead of just "Here's a giant rat, kill it"
I couldn't get into the first, I didn't even bother getting into the city because it was really boring right from the start.
The start is boring but the game just gets better and better from there
The one thing I didn't like (albeit I only played for about 30 minutes) about the first one is the combat. I'm not a fan of the cursor-independent point and click to attack system. The second doesn't have that type of system, right? It's more of third person shooter style point and attack, right?
[QUOTE=Watevaman;28734852]The one thing I didn't like (albeit I only played for about 30 minutes) about the first one is the combat. I'm not a fan of the cursor-independent point and click to attack system. The second doesn't have that type of system, right? It's more of third person shooter style point and attack, right?[/QUOTE] Yeah you press left and right click to swing your sword at will, enemies or no enemies.
[QUOTE=OutOfExile2;28732779]My favorite part of the Witcher is probably the incredible lore. They have little myths to explain why all of the creatures exist instead of just "Here's a giant rat, kill it"[/QUOTE] Try the books the game is based on [url]http://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Wish-Andrzej-Sapkowski/dp/0575082445/ref=sr_1_7?ie=UTF8&qid=1300748827&sr=8-7[/url]
[QUOTE=Riutet;28735747]Yeah you press left and right click to swing your sword at will, enemies or no enemies.[/QUOTE] Good to know. Any word on a demo for The Witcher 2?
I couldn't get into the first one because of how it checked my system requirements. I run dual cards, a integrated card and an nvidia 330m. The first one only picked up on the integrated card so it never let me even start the game. A screen popped up just saying that my system reqs are too low. If they change that for this game its a definite buy.
[QUOTE=POLOPOZOZO;28732890]I couldn't get into the first, I didn't even bother getting into the city because it was really boring right from the start.[/QUOTE] The game picks up in chapter 3. :colbert:
OK, just reinstalled TW1 on a 64-bit Win7 machine, and I get the bug where the menus/load screens are just black and the game crashes when I try to start a new game. Anyone else get this problem?
[QUOTE=markfu;28739176]I couldn't get into the first one because of how it checked my system requirements. I run dual cards, a integrated card and an nvidia 330m. The first one only picked up on the integrated card so it never let me even start the game. A screen popped up just saying that my system reqs are too low. If they change that for this game its a definite buy.[/QUOTE] I remember having this problem on XP for the demo so I never got the game it was only when I could try the demo on Windows 7 I realised I wanted it
One thing I thought was great in the first game, was that the city actually felt populated, with people talking, yelling at you, at eachother, it's pretty cool.
[QUOTE=Watevaman;28737851]Good to know. Any word on a demo for The Witcher 2?[/QUOTE] Not that anyone knows of, I think we're liable to see one nearing release though.
[QUOTE=Riutet;28745035]Not that anyone knows of, I think we're liable to see one nearing release though.[/QUOTE] I'm pretty certain they said not before release think it was somewhere in that GOG video from last week
[QUOTE=cjone2;28745682]I'm pretty certain they said not before release think it was somewhere in that GOG video from last week[/QUOTE] Probably did yeah. Herp.
Hello precious, do go upstairs! Hello precious, do go upstairs! Hello pre-SHUT. UP. Stupid old lady, I'm glad she disappeared from Shani's place after I brought Alvin there. I like to imagine she turned into the ratty old bat that she really was and flew away...
Well I have decided next weekend to try playing the game again. Last year on the same weekend I started playing, got to the [sp]swamp like forests with magical rocks or something[/sp] :v: and had to format. This time I will play it all the way to the end and (hopefully) stream my entire playthrough! :buddy: [editline]22nd March 2011[/editline] Whoah what the flip [img]http://dl.dropbox.com/u/8938276/Media/whoahwhat.png[/img] I thought it was cancelled :raise:
I think that technically it's on hold until further notice.
[QUOTE=aydin690;28739807]The game picks up in chapter 3. :colbert:[/QUOTE] That's like halfway through a long RPG that is ridiculous.
[url]http://www.vg247.com/2011/03/22/witcher-2-gop-details-combat-confirms-pc-controller-support/[/url] [quote]&#8220;First of all, the combat has absolutely not been dumbed down,&#8221; Tomasz Gop, senior producer on The Witcher 2, is keen to assure those of us that have gathered for this online Q&A session. &#8220;Nor has the game been consolised,&#8221; he continues. That these words are juxtaposed with several seconds of frenetic mouse-clicking as Gop demos the combat in the Witcher 2 shouldn&#8217;t alarm too many people, as it later becomes evident that there is depth and flexibility in the combat system. However, it is clear that the subtle timing required by the first game&#8217;s combat system in order to build combos, is most definitely a thing of the past. The &#8216;fast&#8217; and &#8216;heavy&#8217; combat styles from the first game are still present and, as before, each works better against a light or heavy-set foes. This time around the styles have been mapped to left and right mouse buttons respectively, allowing you to chain your attacks on the fly without having to switch between one move set and another. There&#8217;s also more emphasis on the &#8216;signs,&#8217; Geralt&#8217;s magical abilities that allow him to shoot fire from his finger tips or protect himself from attacks with a shield of electricity. It&#8217;s now possible to charge and aim these attacks, giving Geralt limited ranged combat options as well as being able to set traps for enemies. This is all reminiscent of, dare I mention it, Dragon Age. Witcher 2 gameplay from E3 2010. Criticisms that the majority of the additional weapons in The Witcher were entirely superfluous have been addressed, and Gop is keen to highlight that you&#8217;ll have the option to invest some of Geralt&#8217;s levelling-up progress in increasing his combat prowess with these tools, giving you options outside of his silver and steel Witcher swords. Overall, Gop&#8217;s promise that &#8220;the combat has been made more accessible,&#8221; rather than dumbed down, seem to ring true. The devil&#8217;s in the details Gop goes on to discuss gameplay details, some reiterated and some new. There will be 16 &#8216;states&#8217; in which the main plot, which Gop places at some 40 hours of gameplay, can end. Gop says that ten of these will feature big changes &#8211; such as the death of a companion or whether or not a particular country has been wiped from the map entirely &#8211; and the other six will be based on relatively minor details, such as which factions you&#8217;re on speaking terms with when the plot concludes. The fashionable option of being able to import a save game from The Witcher is in effect here, but with no post-ending save available in the first game it&#8217;s unlikely that this will have major implications for the plot of the sequel. Of course, there will be plenty going on outside of the main story arc, with numerous side quests, &#8216;romantic&#8217; entanglements, and mini-games to entertain you. The fist fights and poker dice from The Witcher 1 make a return, though both have been tweaked, with QTE elements added to the former and physics to the latter, allowing you to manipulate the rolling of the dice. A new arm wrestling mini-game has been added and there&#8217;s now the chance to take control of characters aside from Geralt, with Gop confirming that Geralt&#8217;s bard companion, Dandelion, will be playable for parts of the game. At this stage, it&#8217;s not clear in what capacity you&#8217;ll play as him, or whether any of Geralt&#8217;s other companions, such as spellcaster Triss or the irascible Zoltan, will be available to play. Man in the mirror Gop was keen to address feedback he and his team have received about Geralt&#8217;s appearance in trailers for The Witcher 2. Fears that CD Projekt is looking to make Geralt younger or easier on the eye appear unfounded, and new concept art was released showing how Geralt will look in the final game. If anything, he&#8217;s has been made to look older, and the &#8216;poster boy&#8217; looks of trailers released so far have been replaced by a more grizzled visage. The image shown wasn&#8217;t meant for mass distribution, unfortunately, so we&#8217;re not able to show it here. CD Projekt has built a new game engine from scratch and the appearance of the game has benefitted greatly with some smart lighting effects, but the biggest improvement has been in the character models. These look more detailed, better animated than in the first game which, although pretty at times, suffered from some stilted animations, especially when the characters were engaged in conversation. The interface, too, has been overhauled, with abilities and magic now accessible from a radial menu that allows on-the-hoof selection and looks to further streamline combat. What&#8217;s in the box? Trevor Longino, head of PR and marketing of gog.com (Good Old Games, a sister company of CD Projekt) was on hand to outline the offer available through the digital distribution channel. Buying the game through gog.com will secure you the DRM-free digital download copy of the game &#8211; an exclusive to GOG &#8211; as well as a host of extras, including making of videos, the official soundtrack and a number of PDF downloadables in the form of an artbook, world map and papercraft models. Customers will also receive one free game from a selection of five on gog.com. It hasn&#8217;t yet been decided whether pre-loading of game content will be possible, nor was Longino able to specify the size of the download, though Gop confirmed that the physical version of the game will ship on two dual-layered DVDs. Despite this, Logino is keen to assure us that gog.com is more than capable of coping with the expected demand. Gop was pleased to confirm full native 3D support as well as controller support, a sign that neither gameplay nor controls would hinder any potential console conversion. Asked whether this release signalled a change of approach for the download service which, up until now, has focussed on the distribution of older titles, Logino hinted that The Witcher 1 may also be made available. It&#8217;s difficult to imagine that new titles from high-profile third-party publishers will be made available on GOG, however, with one of the bigger sticking points for many a publisher likely to be the site&#8217;s &#8216;DRM-free&#8217; mandate. Technically speaking Gop was vague when asked about potential plans to bring The Witcher 2 to consoles, stating simply that they would &#8220;like to see it happen&#8221;. Nor would he confirm what the team might work on beyond this game, stating that CD Projekt were very much a &#8220;one-game-at-a-time kind of team&#8221;. He did quash rumours that CD Projekt might next work on an MMO, however. You&#8217;re not going to need too beefy a PC to play The Witcher 2. Recommended systems specs are yet to be released, but minimum specs are confirmed as: dual core 2GHz processor, 2GB RAM and a 512MB Geforce 8800. No Mac version is planned at this stage, nor will a demo be available prior to the game&#8217;s release. Gop was pleased to confirm full native 3D support as well as controller support, a sign that neither gameplay nor controls would hinder any potential console conversion. Overall, the impression left by The Witcher 2 is very positive, with the key RPG elements from the first game remaining intact and combat being overhauled to give more direct control of the action. Hands-on time will reveal just how &#8216;consolised&#8217; the game feels, but the signs are good that this will be a worthy successor to CD Projekt&#8217;s 2007 debut. The Witcher 2 releases on PC on May 17.[/quote] Accusations of the combat being dumbed down are a bit herp, combat couldn't get any dumber in the first, the combat has however moved to being even more like action-RPG combat, which in comparison to the previous combat system is a big improvement, but I can see why some people might not like this as they could have just worked on adding depth to the old system. Not a dumbing down though. The bit about the 16 endings being states rather than full blown different endings with unique events leading up to them is somewhat disappointing, technically it means there'll be a fair bit of variety in how the game ends, but still. [quote] particular country has been wiped from the map entirely[/quote] Not a big fan of how epic this sounds either. Not liking what I've seen of the fist fighting mini-game, too much QTE not enough gameplay, although I did see a video of fist fighting outside of a minigame where Geralt was punching people directly without QTEs, but it was claimed to be unfinished and the people he punched ragdolled limply in one punch confirming this, so unsure whether QTEs will have a greater role outside of the minigames. [img]http://www.gram.pl/upl/artykul/20110315140142_s.jpg[/img] Picture of inventory screen shown in the stream. Pretty consolised, don't like not being able to see pretty much everything right away. [quote]Did you guys know that in TW2 you won't be able to see the actual dialogue lines Geralt will speak, before you choose your response? Why on Earth would they move to the inferior, immersion-breaking dialogue system? I'll be translating this later to share with all of you English speaking people. ([url]http://www.gram.pl/art_9gvkHu7_Wiedzmin_2_Zabojcy_krolow_pierwsze_wrazenia.html[/url] , in Polish)[/quote] Not sure whether this is true yet, I hope not it's really stupid.
At least the weapons and armor are seemingly better this time around though. Finding new loot was pretty much nonexistent in the first game and weapons were only useful for a quick buck, besides the occasional meteorite/rune or quest sword.
Never really bothered me that, loot hunting is the bane of RPGs.
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