• The use of Hemp as a "miracle" plant.
    53 replies, posted
[QUOTE=hypno-toad;34335812]Tell that to all the heavy war-bows and seige crossbows that had hemp strings.[/QUOTE] Actually they used animal sinew and hair. This included human hair as well sometimes. Steel was also used to make the strings for crossbows by the tail end of the medieval era.
[QUOTE=Nick Nack;34322240]What do you think photosynthesis is?[/QUOTE] inefficient [editline]22nd January 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=SIRIUS;34330994]electric cars are also alot better than people think... yet hardly anyone uses them... notice a pattern?[/QUOTE] hardly anyone uses them because a) the batteries don't hold that much charge. range is about a hundred miles or so b) the infrastructure isn't there. you can't recharge at a petrol station c) they're expensive
[QUOTE=DainBramageStudios;34340462]inefficient [editline]22nd January 2012[/editline] hardly anyone uses them because a) the batteries don't hold that much charge. range is about a hundred miles or so b) the infrastructure isn't there. you can't recharge at a petrol station c) they're expensive[/QUOTE] Basically that. The only way it can work is hybrid or as a second car for short journeys. It would take several days to do lands end- john o'groats. But as has been said this is not the electric car thread.
[QUOTE=HolyCrusade;34335865]That's fantastic and all, but this is the year 2012. I don't care that it made a relatively good rope hundreds of years ago, today there are far superior alternatives.[/QUOTE] Synthetic alternatives are fantastic and all, but they require a more complex and synthetic-reliant production process that is probably not going to be economically viable forever. While hemp shouldn't be a staple fiber product, it should remain in production and be bred to be increasingly better [editline]22nd January 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=Sobotnik;34339496]Actually they used animal sinew and hair. This included human hair as well sometimes. Steel was also used to make the strings for crossbows by the tail end of the medieval era.[/QUOTE] Animal sinew was used by natives of many regions but its a low-yield product better suited to hunters, people who already have access to sinew. IIRC human hair wasn't used often if it was used at all, not much to go on other than myth. Hemp, linen and silk were the predominant bowstring materials for heavy bows as they are both readily available and can hold a few hundred pounds of force on each end when brought into a flemish twist.
[QUOTE=hypno-toad;34342898] Synthetic alternatives are fantastic and all, but they require a more complex and synthetic-reliant production process that is probably not going to be economically viable forever. While hemp shouldn't be a staple fiber product, it should remain in production and be bred to be increasingly better Hemp, linen and silk were the predominant bowstring materials for heavy bows as they are both readily available and can hold a few hundred pounds of force on each end when brought into a flemish twist.[/QUOTE] However those materials have now been greatly supplanted by superior versions. Also if hemp can be improved upon as a renewable fibre, why not silk? Silk is the worlds strongest natural fibre. Also remember that flax and silk are superior to hemp in their own ways.
[QUOTE=Sobotnik;34343300]However those materials have now been greatly supplanted by superior versions. Also if hemp can be improved upon as a renewable fibre, why not silk? Silk is the worlds strongest natural fibre. Also remember that flax and silk are superior to hemp in their own ways.[/QUOTE] Silk is a great material but it's price is quite representative of it's production. Nothing wrong with linen either but flax, like hemp is not suitable for staple production. I'm not saying "hemp is the best thing evar and all crops should be hemp" but to say hemp isn't a very product is pretty ridiculous. It should be used and should be continuously bred to be better.
Hemp is very useful for a single plant.
[QUOTE=DainBramageStudios;34322221]because it isn't as efficient as just extracting energy directly from sunlight with solar panels[/QUOTE] Breaking news: Photosynthesis isn't effective, world is fucked, more at 11.
You cannot get high off hemp, like Nick Nack said it is outlawed because it is an amazing resource, hell go look at the things our founding fathers have said about the hemp plant.
[QUOTE=honse246;34372572]You cannot get high off hemp, like Nick Nack said it is outlawed because it is an amazing resource, hell go look at the things our founding fathers have said about the hemp plant.[/QUOTE] The idea is it an amazing resource is a rather narrow one. Hemp has its uses, but it cannot be used for everything when a huge number of alternatives that are superior in every way exist already.
[QUOTE=ZombieDawgs;34321566]The plant hemp seems to have not gotten any attention in the last few years, with the stresses being put on the planet's oil reserve reaching peak level it seems that hemp would be the perfect alternative, its uses cover: Food Nutrition Medicine Fiber Building material Use with plastics Paper Fabric Cordage (rope etc) Water and soil purification Weed control and most importantly: [B]A fuel source[/B]. My question is: can it really be the answer to a lot of our problems? It produces 25 tonnes of material per hectare per year, grows pretty much anywhere in the world and is useful as a fuel source. I understand the illegality through the cotton industry several years ago, but are there really any downsides or arguments against it other than 'it can make a drug that might make you lazy!!!!'[/QUOTE] I'm guessing you just watched the Union
my opinion is that they should legalise it and then if it is a far superior product that is more efficient and productive then people can use it. I've never been involved in hemp production but I think that considering its little to no THC count the illegality is pretty dumb
[QUOTE=strayebyrd;34373449]my opinion is that they should legalise it and then if it is a far superior product that is more efficient and productive then people can use it. I've never been involved in hemp production but I think that considering its little to no THC count the illegality is pretty dumb[/QUOTE] I don't believe this is because of the actual drug use that is attached to the plant that makes it illegal (seeing as I wouldn't even consider hemp as a drug), rather that hemp can make multiple products like paper and some forms of medicine, and the companies who produce these products now (with wood and all kinds of chemical shit) wouldn't quite like this to happen. Human greed will be the downfall of the human society we know, if we don't change our ways for the better, imho. Then again, not just the company who makes paper would go broke (if not swapping to hemp paper), but also (and eighter way) the companies who deliver the wood, the people who chop the wood (and i'm probably missing a shitload of companies inbetween), all might go out of business. So somewhere, I guess were screwed. [b]Edit:[/b] What some of you don't seem to realise though, or do not know, is that hemp is one of the easiest growing crops in the world. It's not called a "weed" for nothing. I've heard one of the few plants that can grow on a field which is beeing used as fallow (that's probably not the right way to use the word, but I hope you understand). It's honestly alot better than placing onions in the ground for (not even) pennies of profit. [b]Edit:[/b] All this talk about hemp made me sober up and wan't to smoke more. FCUK.
[QUOTE=MyAlt91;34385109]I don't believe this is because of the actual drug use that is attached to the plant that makes it illegal (seeing as I wouldn't even consider hemp as a drug), rather that hemp can make multiple products like paper and some forms of medicine, and the companies who produce these products now (with wood and all kinds of chemical shit) wouldn't quite like this to happen. Human greed will be the downfall of the human society we know, if we don't change our ways for the better, imho. Then again, not just the company who makes paper would go broke (if not swapping to hemp paper), but also (and eighter way) the companies who deliver the wood, the people who chop the wood (and i'm probably missing a shitload of companies inbetween), all might go out of business. So somewhere, I guess were screwed. [b]Edit:[/b] What some of you don't seem to realise though, or do not know, is that hemp is one of the easiest growing crops in the world. It's not called a "weed" for nothing. I've heard one of the few plants that can grow on a field which is beeing used as fallow (that's probably not the right way to use the word, but I hope you understand). It's honestly alot better than placing onions in the ground for (not even) pennies of profit. [b]Edit:[/b] All this talk about hemp made me sober up and wan't to smoke more. FCUK.[/QUOTE] Legalise it for all I care, but don't be surprised when it replaces almost nothing. There is a reason the use of hemp in industry died out by the time the first laws banning it came into effect.
[QUOTE=Sobotnik;34388544]Legalise it for all I care, but don't be surprised when it replaces almost nothing. There is a reason the use of hemp in industry died out by the time the first laws banning it came into effect.[/QUOTE] This man has already stated, exactly what I would have. Just wanted to reconfirm I completely agree with this man. :smile:
It could replace a lot of things we use, but it would most likely be really expensive. It's the same reason why ethanol still hasn't replaced gasoline as a fuel source in cars yet.
ITT: People full of ignorance spewing ignorance on other ignorant people who are attempting to spew ignorance. [QUOTE=electric926;34637771]It could replace a lot of things we use, but it would most likely be really expensive. It's the same reason why ethanol still hasn't replaced gasoline as a fuel source in cars yet.[/QUOTE] Ethanol, if it was implemented world-wide would be much more cost effective than gasoline. The reason it hasn't become the main automotive fuel is because producing it for 1 country isn't cost effective. So basically, people aren't implementing it in a large scale because it will only be cost effective once it is implemented in a large scale. There are a few places that have ethanol stations, though.
[QUOTE=The one that is;34366042]Breaking news: Photosynthesis isn't effective, world is fucked, more at 11.[/QUOTE] The actual process of photosynthesis is very effective, however, that doesn't mean that we're going to get the same amount of energy out of it as the plant has absorbed. Energy will be lost in the manufacturing process (if it was converted to bio-diesel or something).
[QUOTE=Nick Nack;34663219]Ethanol, if it was implemented world-wide would be much more cost effective than gasoline. The reason it hasn't become the main automotive fuel is because producing it for 1 country isn't cost effective. So basically, people aren't implementing it in a large scale because it will only be cost effective once it is implemented in a large scale. There are a few places that have ethanol stations, though.[/QUOTE] Ethanol would be cost effective if we all used it, assuming we could survive the famine brought on by using a huge chunk of our corn crops to making ethanol.
[QUOTE=electric926;34703386]Ethanol would be cost effective if we all used it, assuming we could survive the famine brought on by using a huge chunk of our corn crops to making ethanol.[/QUOTE] You're right. It's not like we would grow more corn or anything. As well, you don't NEED corn to produce ethanol.
If bio-fuel can be efficiently crafted from hemp, then I think that it should be used since hemp is quite easy to grow when grown en masse with professional gear. Why is hemp easy to grow? Because it's a weed (as in a plant that can grow explosively in a way that damages other plants). It's also good to grow hemp en masse because it's effective at binding CO2 from the air.
[QUOTE=Sunday_Roast;34829998]If bio-fuel can be efficiently crafted from hemp, then I think that it should be used since hemp is quite easy to grow when grown en masse with professional gear. Why is hemp easy to grow? Because it's a weed (as in a plant that can grow explosively in a way that damages other plants). It's also good to grow hemp en masse because it's effective at binding C2O from the air.[/QUOTE] C2O! Dicarbon monoxide, were all fucked! No but seriously, hemp was illegalized simply because of its ability to replace so many other fields of inefficient industry.
Well, we know now that it could have supplemented or completely dominated certain production markets, but at the time, hemp was only postured to potentially be a financial problem for certain parties, once certain technologies were available. It's important to think about it in this perspective, because now that we're dealing with the dilemma of internet censorship, we must think back to this period in history. Certain parties with a stake in certain industries are now vying to see to the destruction of something that is postured to be a potential competitor, just as it was before. It's maddening to think that people still haven't changed their behavior, given that that we live with this abundance of information, and that we have the ability to read about the past to gain perspective about the present and the future.
[QUOTE=Zenreon117;34905382] No but seriously, hemp was illegalized simply because of its ability to replace so many other fields of inefficient industry.[/QUOTE] Not really. Cotton is vastly more efficent to grow and mass produce as cloth than hemp. Despite hemp not being made illegal until the 20th century, we see a massive decline in hemp production as cotton production rose during the 18th and 19th centuries.
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