• Is it possible to imagine a color you've never seen?
    142 replies, posted
[QUOTE=st0rmforce;24438471]There's a guy who had the lenses in his eyes replaced with artificial ones. His new lenses didn't block UV, so he could see it. He said that it does look different to other colours, he was going to try to describe it, but realised that it was impossible. You have to see it to understand it.[/QUOTE] The best way to recreate this is by taking a DSLR, remove the anti-UV filter infront of the CMOS sensor, and take some pictures
[QUOTE=Galago;24439100]You can't describe color with words.[/QUOTE] You can describe it scientifically. For example, pure blue has a wavelength frequency of 450 nanometers and each photon of light of this wavelength has 3.1 electron volts of energy.
If you've already seen the 3 primary colours then yes, because it has to be a combination of any of those 3.
How do you describe a color is what I want to know.
[QUOTE=Master117;24439324]You can describe it scientifically. For example, pure blue has a wavelength frequency of 450 nanometers and each, meaning one photon of light of this wavelength has 3.1 electron volts of energy.[/QUOTE] Wow that's brilliant. Thanks for that.
Sure you can, I dreamt one once. It was like, ultraviolet I think. You know the colour beyond deep purple blue? Sort of like total darkness, or where'd you'd expect that to be anyway. Except with a tint of um... ultraviolet.
Could you have a lucid dream and think of a color that you've never seen? :pwn:
[QUOTE=sami-pso;24439434]Wow that's brilliant. Thanks for that.[/QUOTE] To go further you can say that violet and red are sort of chromatically opposite in the sense if you were to take the visible spectrum of light, purple would be on one side and red would be on the opposite. The visible spectrum begins at approximately 360 nanometers for violet and ends at 750 at pure visible red.
I invented this question a year ago damnit. I should never have posted it.
Oh man. I just realised, when I think green, it can be completely different from you guys. I mean, I always just thought we saw the same things, now this realization suddenly occurs to me. My brain is getting fucked royally.
[QUOTE=Mr MP;24438352][URL="http://www.facepunch.com/forumdisplay.php?f=60"]It's not possible[/URL][/QUOTE] [QUOTE=B1N4RY!;24438359]No, and fast threads is only a few sections below.[/QUOTE] Idiots. And no its not.
Short answer: Yes. Long answer: No, and yes. All "color" is in the visible spectrum. That's why they call it visible. Some people can see farther than other people. Some can see IR, which just looks like a very dim reddish brown. Others can see into the ultra violet, which just looks like a dim purple. The other colors can not be seen by our eyes, so we will never know what they would look like. We can 'see' the other colors, but only after machines convert them for us, into the visible spectrum. So even if there are other 'colors' we will never really be able see them. They might as well not exist, as pertaining to your question. [editline]01:16PM[/editline] [QUOTE=Croix;24439771]Oh man. I just realised, when I think green, it can be completely different from you guys. I mean, I always just thought we saw the same things, now this realization suddenly occurs to me. My brain is getting fucked royally.[/QUOTE] Not really. All humans come from more-or-less the same genetic code. All of your eyes are basically the same. If a mutation happened, your brain would either fix it for you, or you wouldn't be able to see.
[QUOTE=st0rmforce;24438471]There's a guy who had the lenses in his eyes replaced with artificial ones. His new lenses didn't block UV, so he could see it. He said that it does look different to other colours, he was going to try to describe it, but realised that it was impossible. You have to see it to understand it.[/QUOTE] Be right back , getting new eye lenses
[QUOTE=o0ICE0o;24439969] All humans come from more-or-less the same genetic code. All of your eyes are basically the same. If a mutation happened, your brain would either fix it for you, or you wouldn't be able to see.[/QUOTE] Yeah, but now it involves perception AND description at the same time. Description is always the same(language), but every person can perceive it different way.
The lens of the eye doesn't 'block' UV light. It's that the retina cant pick it up. [editline]01:26PM[/editline] [QUOTE=Lance99;24440275]Yeah, but now it involves perception AND description at the same time. Description is always the same(language), but every person can perceive it different way.[/QUOTE] We can never really know.
It was odd to see some objects that seemed completely black to me appear red and brown on my webcam when I removed its infrared filter.
Unpossible
[QUOTE=Master117;24439738]To go further you can say that violet and red are sort of chromatically opposite in the sense if you were to take the visible spectrum of light, purple would be on one side and red would be on the opposite. The visible spectrum begins at approximately 360 nanometers for violet and ends at 750 at pure visible red.[/QUOTE] how intense would the colors be beyond 750 nanometers, or before 360 nanometers?
[QUOTE=unnecessary;24440663]how intense would the colors be beyond 750 nanometers, or before 360 nanometers?[/QUOTE] Invisible doh.
Wow, he's so poetic and deep.
Ask Helen Keller... oh right... and oh right again...
Ask a blind person to describe Blue to you...
stop asking.
A parrot can see 4 colours.
Odd you aksed that because today my mom mentioned she saw colors that she never saw or don't exist or something.....:iiam:
[QUOTE=ExplodingGuy;24439077]White is 255,255,255. 256,256,256 is greater than white. It is a common misconception.[/QUOTE] 256,256,256 is tide white.
Sometimes I imagine what it would be like to explain colour to a blind man, and also how we know if we are all seeing the same colours.
[QUOTE=Lance99;24440275]Yeah, but now it involves perception AND description at the same time. Description is always the same(language), but every person can perceive it different way.[/QUOTE] While that's interesting to think, all our brains and eyes work the same way, save a few deficiencies like colour blindness or something. Perception is likely uniform. Now how say birds or sea slugs or something percieves colour, that's a different story.
It's a fascinating concept really but no, I don't think it is possible.
Only if you smoke weed
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