• Gear discussion thread v. "I own more nifty fifties than cameras they fit"
    2,522 replies, posted
oh wow, nice! that's going to be a fun setup. i always wanted to get a c-mount 0.95, how much were the ones you got?
[QUOTE=Trogdon;35542206]oh wow, nice! that's going to be a fun setup. i always wanted to get a c-mount 0.95, how much were the ones you got?[/QUOTE] I had these 0.95 lenses (all C mount): 4x Schneider Kreuznach Xenon 17mm f/0.95 (Obj.-Typ.: XN 0,95/17) with motorized Iris and spot filter 2x Schneider Kreuznach Xenon 25mm f/0.95 (Obj.-Typ.: Xenon 0,95/25 CP 100) The 25mms would be easily adaptable on a M4/3 camera, and also on nex, but not with full coverage. The 25mm lenses go for about 500 euros each on ebay. As for the 17mm lenses, they have motorised irises, and are harder to adapt to any generic C mount because of it's size. Well, you see that whole set on the first picture? I got all of that for under 100 euros (not saying the exact price).
yeah i think nex you have to go at least 35mm, otherwise the circle is too small. but wow that's a great find, and nice job on the sales of all of them that's seriously so awesome.
man i fucking want a d3100. and a 35mm lens. i really wnna start videography now that I'm fluent in photography.
Going to order a 30mm 1.4 off of amazon. Finally no more manual focusing
I am probably going to buy my friends Nikon D200 without a lens for $100. From what i can gather, that seems like a pretty awesome deal. I don't really know anything about cameras, but have always wanted to get a nice one. I just want to hear your guys opinions on it. What would be a good cheap lens(cheap is a big deal) should i get for starters?
[QUOTE=KingKombat;35562570]man i fucking want a d3100. and a 35mm lens. i really wnna start videography now that I'm fluent in photography.[/QUOTE] The 3100 is very very good at videos visually but the mic will pick up the tiniest wind (and the autofocus) and it doesn't have an external mic jack. It's passable when there's no wind, though. Or you can probably stick a piece of foam in front of it, or something. So if your primary use for it is videos and you're looking to record sound along with them I'd suggest getting a different camera, getting something to record the sound externally and mix it with the video in post, or getting an used one, or (probably a bad idea because of impedance differences) cracking it open and adding a jack to it (which is probably what i'll do about a standard cable release jack as soon as my warranty expires)
Ordered a 55-200mm Nikkor for $158 delivered. Plan to use it for some urban daytime shots. Sweeeeet.
[QUOTE=Dylan_94;35564926]I am probably going to buy my friends Nikon D200 without a lens for $100. From what i can gather, that seems like a pretty awesome deal. I don't really know anything about cameras, but have always wanted to get a nice one. I just want to hear your guys opinions on it. What would be a good cheap lens(cheap is a big deal) should i get for starters?[/QUOTE] Congrats on what is regarded by many as Nikon's best camera in it's category. If cheap is that big of a deal, you can get the D3100's kit lens, the Nikon 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G AF-S DX VR, it's pure plastic, it's tiny, it's not very bright, [I]it's a $100 kit lens[/I] and the manual focus ring feels weird to use, but the pictures it takes are fucking amazing (for a $100 kit lens) and the focal range allows for pretty nice wide angles. The VR allows you to take decent pictures freehand at slow speeds (I can shoot at about 1/30 with VR on and the picture still looks good). The macros also look great, which is good 'cause that's the first thing anyone does with an expensive camera :v:. If you're not hot about the camera doing most of the stuff for you you can go vintage and get an old all manual lens for cheap, I suppose. Here's a chart of what lenses work with it: [IMG]http://3.s.img-dpreview.com/reviews/NikonD200/Images/lenscompatible-001.gif?v=1450[/IMG] [IMG]http://puu.sh/pwGZ[/IMG] Take into account that I'm no expert on the subject and I'm randomly replying to threads at six AM, and that this post will probably get surgically autopsied and corrected by one of the wiser photographers in this subforum.
Thank you, that was very helpful.
I just got a D3100 as a replacement for the D60 I lost a year or so ago. I'm enjoying it, but it seems to be [b]terrible[/b] in low light conditions compared to the D60. At ISO 100 in a well lit room I need to shoot at a 2 second shutter speed, that can't be right surely? Or is the ISO scaled differently with this camera? It has a lot less noise at higher ISO settings so that might be it. The video mode is baller as hell though. I'm also having a problem with my nikon telephoto lens - it sometimes won't focus and instead makes a clicking sound. Is it fucked? It starts working if I manually twist the bits around but it's worrying. Edit: In reference to the above post, the kit lens is indeed spectacularly good for what it is.
[QUOTE=Catdaemon;35573997]I just got a D3100 as a replacement for the D60 I lost a year or so ago. I'm enjoying it, but it seems to be [b]terrible[/b] in low light conditions compared to the D60. At ISO 100 in a well lit room I need to shoot at a 2 second shutter speed, that can't be right surely? Or is the ISO scaled differently with this camera? It has a lot less noise at higher ISO settings so that might be it. The video mode is baller as hell though. I'm also having a problem with my nikon telephoto lens - it sometimes won't focus and instead makes a clicking sound. Is it fucked? It starts working if I manually twist the bits around but it's worrying. Edit: In reference to the above post, the kit lens is indeed spectacularly good for what it is.[/QUOTE] ISO 100 is ISO 100, it's a standard not for nothing! :v: Also ISO 100 unless you are using flood lights or something will require a very slow shutter speed indoors. Chances are you have set a smaller aperture (or a slower lens all together) than what you remember using on your D60 or the lighting in the room is different. Remember your eyes adjust to the light so it may seems bright to you but it's definitely not for the camera. For the focusing do those lenses have motors in them? Perhaps they are on their last legs. You should try cleaning the lens contacts (on the lens mount) with a Q-tip and alcohol and see if that does anything. If you have access to another Nikon body (particularly one with a focusing motor in it) you should try the lenses on it and see if they work. Hope this helped.
[QUOTE=BoSoZoku;35574188]ISO 100 is ISO 100, it's a standard not for nothing! :v: Also ISO 100 unless you are using flood lights or something will require a very slow shutter speed indoors. Chances are you have set a smaller aperture (or a slower lens all together) than what you remember using on your D60 or the lighting in the room is different. Remember your eyes adjust to the light so it may seems bright to you but it's definitely not for the camera. For the focusing do those lenses have motors in them? Perhaps they are on their last legs. You should try cleaning the lens contacts (on the lens mount) with a Q-tip and alcohol and see if that does anything. If you have access to another Nikon body (particularly one with a focusing motor in it) you should try the lenses on it and see if they work. Hope this helped.[/QUOTE] Yeah, that's what I thought. I'm sure I could shoot in the same conditions at ISO 100 on my old camera, but I may be wrong. I'm talking bright sunlight coming through a window here, not just a bulb. It's perfectly fine outdoors though. The lens has a built in focusing motor, but it's relatively new so I doubt it's that. I had this problem with my lens with the D60 too. I don't think this lens is compatible with a motor in the body. I'll give cleaning the contacts a go - didn't think of that. [editline]15th April 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=latin_geek;35564954]The 3100 is very very good at videos visually but the mic will pick up the tiniest wind (and the autofocus) and it doesn't have an external mic jack. It's passable when there's no wind, though. Or you can probably stick a piece of foam in front of it, or something. So if your primary use for it is videos and you're looking to record sound along with them I'd suggest getting a different camera, getting something to record the sound externally and mix it with the video in post, or getting an used one, or (probably a bad idea because of impedance differences) cracking it open and adding a jack to it (which is probably what i'll do about a standard cable release jack as soon as my warranty expires)[/QUOTE] I've used the video mode in very windy conditions and it's fine - the AF motor is really loud though yeah, I use manual focus to eliminate that problem. The continuous AF is terrible anyway. I notice quite a bit of noise in the videos I take - is there some setting somewhere I'm not aware of?
I'm a manual focus guy, so autofocus isn't a problem. I'm good at switching angles mid-shooting and getting a subject in focus quickly.
[QUOTE=Catdaemon;35574643]Yeah, that's what I thought. I'm sure I could shoot in the same conditions at ISO 100 on my old camera, but I may be wrong. I'm talking bright sunlight coming through a window here, not just a bulb. It's perfectly fine outdoors though. The lens has a built in focusing motor, but it's relatively new so I doubt it's that. I had this problem with my lens with the D60 too. I don't think this lens is compatible with a motor in the body. I'll give cleaning the contacts a go - didn't think of that. [editline]15th April 2012[/editline] I've used the video mode in very windy conditions and it's fine - the AF motor is really loud though yeah, I use manual focus to eliminate that problem. The continuous AF is terrible anyway. I notice quite a bit of noise in the videos I take - is there some setting somewhere I'm not aware of?[/QUOTE] The D3100 is overall not for videography in my opinion, with the video being skippy instead of blurry because it reaches 30fps at most, and the integrated mic with no mic jack. It's just marketed as that because it's a d3000 with video recording and a couple other functions and improvements. It should at least have a jack for an external mic. Seriously, how expensive is that to implement? (also, rant about it having a proprietary shutter cable connector and no infrared shutter release number one million.) [editline]15th April 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=KingKombat;35576427]I'm a manual focus guy, so autofocus isn't a problem. I'm good at switching angles mid-shooting and getting a subject in focus quickly.[/QUOTE] Good luck with that with the d3100's kitlens, the focus ring has about an eight of a turn and it's really loose :v:
[QUOTE=Catdaemon;35574643]Yeah, that's what I thought. I'm sure I could shoot in the same conditions at ISO 100 on my old camera, but I may be wrong. I'm talking bright sunlight coming through a window here, not just a bulb. It's perfectly fine outdoors though. The lens has a built in focusing motor, but it's relatively new so I doubt it's that. I had this problem with my lens with the D60 too. I don't think this lens is compatible with a motor in the body. I'll give cleaning the contacts a go - didn't think of that.[/QUOTE] Light coming from outside is still not as bright as being outside though. [QUOTE=Catdaemon;35574643] I've used the video mode in very windy conditions and it's fine - the AF motor is really loud though yeah, I use manual focus to eliminate that problem. The continuous AF is terrible anyway. I notice quite a bit of noise in the videos I take - is there some setting somewhere I'm not aware of?[/QUOTE] Never use AF in video, DSLRs are not camcorders you use them to get nice shots more than just recording moments. :wink: You can use a silicon jar opener as a cheap follow focus. [URL="http://www.everydaytutorial.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/FollowFocus.jpg"]Like this.[/URL] Also use all manual and set your shutter speed as closely as double your FPS. (if you shoot at 24fps use 1/50, for 30fps 1/60 etc.) [QUOTE=latin_geek;35576747]The D3100 is overall not for videography in my opinion, with the video being skippy instead of blurry because it reaches 30fps at most, and the integrated mic with no mic jack. It's just marketed as that because it's a d3000 with video recording and a couple other functions and improvements. It should at least have a jack for an external mic. Seriously, how expensive is that to implement? (also, rant about it having a proprietary shutter cable connector and no infrared shutter release number one million.)[/QUOTE] The video being too skippy could be because you have a shutter speed too fast for the FPS (you get choppy motion like Saving Private Ryan) or simply you are trying to shoot action too fast for the FPS you have set. Remember that pretty much all movies (a part from slowmo scenes) have been usually shot at 24FPS. (because it was the slowest they could go to keep the costs of film down) Also for audio you can just use an external recorder and sync in post with the on board audio. (that's a standard for cinema too) As I said before the problem is expecting a DSLR to be fast an easy like a camcorder, you can get great result if you know what you are dealing with and how to work with it. (which also means knowing it's shortcomings like moire, rolling shutter etc.)
I got my Nikon D200 last night, and a lensbaby to borrow, just so i have a lens. This camera is so confusing, it's going to take a while to figure it out. I've been reading through the manual.
I'll soon be picking up a refurbished 600D :) It's my first DSLR, and I'm gonna be using it for both video and photos. Excited!
Is there anywhere I can read about what all these different mm sizes mean and how the pictures differ with different lens sizes?
[QUOTE=Kabstrac;35612336]Is there anywhere I can read about what all these different mm sizes mean and how the pictures differ with different lens sizes?[/QUOTE] Basically the smaller the number in mm the bigger will your field of view be. Some links. [URL="http://blog.muddyboots.org/2012/02/focal-length-examples.html"]Photos (same subject different focal lengths)[/URL] [URL="http://www.usa.canon.com/app/html/EFLenses101/focal_length.html"]Same as above but interactive[/URL] [URL="http://www.paragon-press.com/lens/lenchart.htm"]Explanation[/URL]
[QUOTE=Dylan_94;35598291]I got my Nikon D200 last night, and a lensbaby to borrow, just so i have a lens. This camera is so confusing, it's going to take a while to figure it out. I've been reading through the manual.[/QUOTE] That camera is great. I loved it. I prefer the looks and ergonomics to my Canon 7D actually
[url]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003ZSHNG8/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=&seller=[/url] How is this for a beginning wannabe-photographer?
[QUOTE=Super_Nova;35623494][url]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003ZSHNG8/ref=olp_product_details?ie=UTF8&me=&seller=[/url] How is this for a beginning wannabe-photographer?[/QUOTE] I don't know the specifics of that camera, but a rule of thumb is cameras costing around that price won't give you quality photos. They usually handle noise poorly, the lenses aren't that great, they are slow and there are plenty more reasons. Obviously there's a reason there are cameras that cost ten times that. I guess for a beginner it's ok, but personally I'd invest in a cheap dslr which you can always sell if you don't like it.
[url]http://www.amazon.com/Canon-Rebel-T3-Digital-18-55mm/dp/B004J3Y9U6/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1334776239&sr=1-1[/url] Hows this then?
[QUOTE=Super_Nova;35623994][url]http://www.amazon.com/Canon-Rebel-T3-Digital-18-55mm/dp/B004J3Y9U6/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1334776239&sr=1-1[/url] Hows this then?[/QUOTE] I've heard it was alright, but if you're serious about it, you're gonna grow out of it pretty quickly.
[QUOTE=Super_Nova;35623994][url]http://www.amazon.com/Canon-Rebel-T3-Digital-18-55mm/dp/B004J3Y9U6/ref=sr_1_1?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1334776239&sr=1-1[/url] Hows this then?[/QUOTE] This is what my entry DSLR is. It's very nice. It's not THAT pricey.
The T3 is actually pretty great to get you into the mindset of taking good photos, changing lenses, setting everything manually, etc. Buy better gear as your skill grows, but start at a good point.
This just in [URL]http://press.nikonusa.com/post/2012/04/19/simply-stunning-the-new-nikon-d3200-is-the-simple-way-to-chronicle-memories-with-superior-image-and-hd-video-quality/[/URL] [B] [quote=Nikon]Simply Stunning: The New Nikon D3200 Is The Simple Way To Chronicle Memories With Superior Image And HD Video Quality[/B] [I]The Nikon D3200 Provides New D-SLR Shooters a Powerful Combination of Effortless Operation, 24.2-Megapixel High Resolution and Wireless Connectivity to Mobile Devices[/I] [B]MELVILLE, N.Y. (APRIL 19, 2012)[/B] – Today, imaging leader Nikon Inc. introduced the new 24.2-megapixel Nikon D3200 HD-SLR; a camera designed for photo enthusiasts ready to step up to a D-SLR or for the busy family memory keeper with an active lifestyle who demands a camera that can keep pace. From low-light to fast action, the D3200 delivers the amazing image quality Nikon is known for, either indoors or outside. Whether new to photography or upgrading from a point-and-shoot, the D3200 features Nikon’s acclaimed instructive Guide Mode to help unleash the photographer in everyone. From candid action shots to staged portraits that flatter, the Nikon D3200 provides the power to capture every moment easily and beautifully with stellar image quality and in stunning Full HD (1080p) video. Ready to tag along for any outing, the Nikon D3200’s compact, lightweight body makes it easy to pack for a quick day trip or the long haul. A host of advanced features, including a super high resolution 24.2-megapixel DX-format CMOS sensor, Full HD (1080p) video recording with full time autofocus (AF) and 4 frames-per-second (fps) high-speed continuous shooting mode, prepare the D3200 for challenging lighting conditions and fast paced action. Also, Nikon D3200 users will be able to take advantage of the new WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter. When connected to the camera, this optional adapter can wirelessly send images to mobile devices like smartphones and tablets, preview an image before shooting and control the camera remotely. “When every moment is as precious as the next one, having a camera that takes the guesswork out of photography is important,” said Bo Kajiwara, director of marketing, Nikon Inc. “The Nikon D3200 HD-SLR offers effortless functionality and easy-to-use connectivity to mobile devices that answers the call for a capable, entry-level D-SLR that will change how you share amazing images with your friends and family.” Stunning Images to Last a Lifetime The new Nikon D3200 delivers outstanding image quality no matter the user’s skill level by leveraging Nikon’s renowned technologies. The new 24.2-megapixel DX-format CMOS sensor allows for incredibly sharp images with stunning detail and less noise, while Nikon’s EXPEED 3™ image processing engine helps to create clear, lifelike images and video with vivid colors, smooth tonal gradations and low noise. The Nikon D3200 grants users impressive performance in low-light, affording the ability to shoot with assurance even during night games and school plays. With a native ISO range that extends from ISO 100 to 6400, the D3200 can also be expanded to a high of ISO 12,800 for extreme low-light situations resulting in previously impossible photos. Additionally, Nikon’s Scene Recognition System works in tandem with the camera’s 3D Color Matrix Metering II to recognize factors such as color and brightness for balanced exposures, accurate AF, faithful white balance and beautiful flash photos. Effortless Operation Beginner photographers as well as those looking to expand their repertoire of shooting techniques will appreciate the Nikon D3200’s Guide Mode which provides step-by-step photo instructions to capture amazing images. Easily accessible through the Mode Dial found on top of the camera body, the Guide Mode walks beginning D-SLR users through the process of set-up, shooting, viewing and deleting images. Because it asks the user what kind of creative photo technique they would like to learn, the Guide Mode has been widely acclaimed for its ability to build confidence and give users the tools to create amazing images. As more people discover the benefits of replacing their camcorder with a D-SLR, the Guide Mode also walks users through the best video settings to create home movies with blockbuster flair. For those with a more advanced skill level, the Guide Mode features helpful Assist Images that serve as a visual reference to inspire users and illustrate the desired result, while guiding them through easy-to-follow techniques. Further taking the guesswork out of photography, the D3200 also includes six Scene Modes. Photographers can set the Mode Dial to Portrait, Landscape, Child, Sports, Close-Up or Night Portrait, and the D3200 will automatically adjust camera settings for optimal results in a variety of conditions. Beautiful Home Movies in Full HD When images alone can’t tell the whole story, the Nikon D3200 offers the full HD experience of high quality 1080p video. Users can create memorable, cinematic quality videos at 24 or 30 fps and easily share HD content online with friends and family or on their own HDTV via the HDMI output. Continuing down the path that its predecessor, the Nikon D3100, started, the D3200 implements full-time AF during video recording to help capture crisp video even during the most action-packed situations. To boost the production value of any home video, the camera offers manual or automatic exposure control, and a stereo microphone input to attach an optional external microphone such as the compact ME-1 Stereo Microphone. Furthermore, the D3200 offers other HD-SLR advantages including the ability to create a shallow depth of field, amazing low-light video performance and NIKKOR lens versatility. Capturing videos on the D3200 is simple, even when in Live View. With a dedicated video record button and easy access to the Live View switch, users can capture video clips before the moment is gone. Additionally, videos play with astonishing detail and clarity on the D3200’s 3-inch, high resolution 921,000-dot LCD screen. A Camera to Keep Pace with an Energetic Existence An active lifestyle requires a capable camera that is ready at a moment’s notice, and the Nikon D3200 packs powerful technology to tackle just about any challenge. Delivering up to 4 fps in high-speed continuous shooting mode, the D3200 helps ensure that important, spontaneous and easy-to-miss memories are captured, from a baby’s first smile to a game winning grand slam. Additionally, the D3200’s advanced 11-point AF system allows the user to find and keep focus while maintaining a clear view of that subject. This advanced focusing system is ideal for capturing tricky subjects like a dancer mid-leap during the big recital or a dive for the line drive in centerfield. The Nikon D3200’s power is amplified when combined with the versatility of Nikon’s legendary NIKKOR optics and powerful accessories. Compatible with Nikon’s dedicated DX-format lenses and over 50 FX-format lenses as well as Nikon’s Speedlight System, the Nikon D3200 puts creativity at the user’s fingertips. The optional WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter for the D3200 allows the connected user to easily share photos taken on the D3200 to an Android™ platform based smartphone or tablet, so friends and family can enjoy the moment almost as quickly as it happens.1 Android platform users are able to wirelessly transfer images from the camera to a mobile device, preview the image before shooting photos, and even remotely control the camera from up to 49 feet. The Application for use with an Android platform smartphone (2.3 series) and tablet (3.x series) is expected for release in May 2012.2 Additionally, an Application for the iPhone® and iPad® mobile digital device is expected for release in Fall 2012.3 Price and Availability The Nikon D3200 outfit with the versatile AF-S DX NIKKOR 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6G VR image stabilization lens will be available in late April 2012 for a suggested retail price (SRP) of $699.95* in either Black or Red. The optional WU-1a Wireless Mobile Adapter, sold separately, will be available in late May 2012 for a suggested retail price (SRP) of $59.95*. For more information on the Nikon D3200, NIKKOR lenses, additional Nikon D-SLR cameras and accessories, please visit [url]www.nikonusa.com[/url].[/quote] [img]http://i.imgur.com/GMgJp.jpg[/img] Looks like Nikon is going full on with this high MP count.
So basically a D3100 with sony sensor and wifi...
Just ordered a Panasonic GH2 [url]http://vimeo.com/31835141[/url] Dat grain :v:
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