• Magnetic Water
    121 replies, posted
Alright, so one day my dad comes home with a peculiar bright-red cylinder, around the size of a fist. I ask him what it is, and he replies "It's a Water-Magnetizer". "I think it will fix up that rash of yours." You see, I've had this rash on my right elbow, for around a month now. We visited the doctor, and he said it was probably because of the cat. He prescripted me a cream and told me to apply it daily before I go to sleep. While my dad was installing it, I went on the internet researching it. I then read about the whole "Magnetic Water" thing. [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_water_treatment]Wiki.[/url] It's pseudoscience. I told my Dad that he got ripped off, but he then replies "Just try it for a few days, and we'll see." He then told me I should wash my elbow with it regularly. Then over the next few days, I do it (occasionally. Maybe once a day), and he gets mad (That I'm only doing it once a day). I've countlessly tried to explain to him that it's not real, and even if it is, it wouldn't help my rash, but he's still insisting. Now, I'm not one to disrespect my dad, and he's a pretty smart guy, but I don't really know what the hell's gotten over him. Here's a picture I made of the "Device": [IMG]http://filebox.me/files/g7b2v0f04_Screenie.gif[/IMG] [B]Edit:[/B] It's supposed to change the arrangement of the calcium in the water, not actually make the water magnetic. Sorry if anyone misunderstood that. [B]Update;-[/B] We just recently returned from a trip to Egypt. My dad bought a whole bunch of those things and started giving them out to relatives. I feel bad for doubting his judgement now. It seems to change the taste of water there, and I also noticed (when I was making coffee) that magnetic water seems to have slightly less transparent bubbles when I boil it. Egypt's water supply comes from the Nile river, by the way. (Also, ever since he installed it in the shower, my dandruff problem has been slowly fading away. Could just be a coincidence though.)
Wow. Something called a "water-magnetizer" is pseudoscience? I'm shocked.
(Actually, I have no idea what the fuck its called)
Phahaha
is the magnet in the "water-magnetizer" strong enough to pull a roof off of a house? if not, it's "bullshit kitchen magnet 'placebo effect' device"
Well, I tried to test its strength, and I poked it with a paper clip. No effect. I don't even think there's a magnet in there.
Grind up a magnet and inhale the powder. It works just as well as magnetic water, you know.
p sure nonmetals can't be magnetic
[QUOTE=The Epidemic;15754052]Well, I tried to test its strength, and I poked it with a paper clip. No effect. I don't even think there's a magnet in there.[/QUOTE] You got ripped, I recommend you buy some cream for that cat rash you got instead of using something crazy as this. I re-read this thread, what the hell was your dad thinking?
[QUOTE=Craptasket;15754097]You got ripped, I recommend you buy some cream for that cat rash you got instead of using something crazy as this.[/QUOTE] He didn't buy it, his dad did. Reeeaaaddd. Show your dad the wiki article and any other information you can find.
Well, according to wikipedia, it's supposed to change the arrangement of the calcium in the water (lime).
I like your diagram. It's nicely shaded.
put some magnetic water to your dick and you can have sex with robots
The idea of the century.
[QUOTE=Pvt. Ryan;15754088]p sure nonmetals can't be magnetic[/QUOTE] Maybe you could magnetise the oxygen?
[QUOTE=Pvt. Ryan;15754088]p sure nonmetals can't be magnetic[/QUOTE] Water is dipolar and does react to magnetic fields.
Tell your dad to explain how exactly it works. Then punch him in the face for being an idiot when he can't do it.
[QUOTE=Negrul1;15755598]Maybe you could magnetise the oxygen?[/QUOTE] [quote=Pvt. Ryan]p sure nonmetals can't be magnetic[/quote] :golfclap:
[QUOTE=Peluri;15755249]put some magnetic water to your dick and you can have sex with robots[/QUOTE] Godly.
Your dad is stupid. Don't use it, it's a waste of time and makes you look like an idiot.
Wow... Your dad got fooled.
Even if that magnet was strong enough to levitate water (50 Tesla), it wouldn't have any medicinal effect.
[QUOTE=The Epidemic;15753970] It's pseudoscience.[/QUOTE] :pseudo: Anyways, this is quite interesting. [editline]04:54PM[/editline] [QUOTE=FunnyBunny;15754060]Grind up a magnet and inhale the powder. It works just as well as magnetic water, you know.[/QUOTE] :ughh:
[QUOTE=Pvt. Ryan;15754088]p sure nonmetals can't be magnetic[/QUOTE] They can.
Someone got arrested in the early 20th century for selling a tube of glass and metal. he said it boosted radio waves (which it turns out was true) and they said it was fraudulent.
Actually, water is slightly magnetic from start. If a person were close to one of those huge magnetic objects in space (magnetsoare?) they'd be ripped apart just from the slight magnetism in the water. Not that it makes any differense on earth.
All I can see this doing is taking iron from the water out. Which could be a problem if your running on iron pipes etc.
I don't see how putting water through a magnet would help a rash, or do anything at all.
[QUOTE=Negrul1;15755598]Maybe you could magnetise the oxygen?[/QUOTE] Nonmetals are magnetic? they made a device that can levitate frogs with magnetism:science:
hax
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