• Tesla Motors!
    119 replies, posted
[quote]“Bricking” is an irrational fear based on limited information and a misunderstanding of Tesla’s battery system.[/quote] Which is why it's happened five times already. I hate Tesla. As soon as someone starts pointing out the flaws in their cars, they go into butthurt mode. First with the TopGear lawsuit (which got thrown out in court) and now [url=http://jalopnik.com/5887499/who-is-trying-to-smear-the-tesla-battery-problem-whistleblower]they're trying to smear the guy who let the public know about this problem.[/url] And just to make matters worse, they wouldn't be around to whine about this shit if they hadn't leeched so much government money. If anyone is going to make a decent electric car, it won't be Tesla.
I do think electric cars are the future, just not with batteries like this. Thorium reactors :3
[QUOTE=Second-gear-of-mgear;34864518]I do think electric cars are the future, just not with batteries like this. Thorium reactors :3[/QUOTE] But that's radioactive! All the soccormoms would cry Chernobyl
[QUOTE=rampageturke 2;34864848]But that's radioactive! All the soccormoms would cry Chernobyl[/QUOTE] WE CANT USE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS THEY'RE RADIOACTIVE WE NEED TO USE SOLAR PANELS INSTEAD
Telsas are common where I live. Then again I live 30 min from the factory here in Silicon Valley..
Electric motocross. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Bni45TKUrA[/media] Dont like, best part of the video is at 2:35 with that motor sound.
diesel-electric is only a stepping stone
[QUOTE=Super_Noodle;34865212]WE CANT USE NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS THEY'RE RADIOACTIVE WE NEED TO USE SOLAR PANELS INSTEAD[/QUOTE] Yeah! Fuck clean, sustainable energy, we need to use the shit that'll kill creatures and people horribly and slowly, [I]and[/I] poison the surroundings! Seriously, what the fuck kind of logic says that nuclear energy is cleaner and safer then [I]solar fucking panels?[/I]
[QUOTE=hoodoo456;34973223]Yeah! Fuck clean, sustainable energy, we need to use the shit that'll kill creatures and people horribly and slowly, [I]and[/I] poison the surroundings! Seriously, what the fuck kind of logic says that nuclear energy is cleaner and safer then [I]solar fucking panels?[/I][/QUOTE] Nuclear energy is both safe and clean if you place the reactor somewhere safe (like not in a Tsunami or earthquake area), and you find a way to deal with the nuclear waste.
[QUOTE=LarparNar;34973498]Nuclear energy is both safe and clean if you place the reactor somewhere safe (like not in a Tsunami or earthquake area), and you find a way to deal with the nuclear waste.[/QUOTE] Yes, find a way to dispose of the nuclear waste that'll take hundreds of thousands of years to become entirely harmless. You're fooling yourself if you ever think we'll be able to do that.
[QUOTE=hoodoo456;34973516]Yes, find a way to dispose of the nuclear waste that'll take hundreds of thousands of years to become entirely harmless. You're fooling yourself if you ever think we'll be able to do that.[/QUOTE] I didn't say dispose of it, I said deal with it. Store it somewhere, use it for something useful, shoot it into the sun, find [I]any[/I] way. I'm not saying I know how to do it, but dismissing it as impossible isn't going to get us anywhere.
[QUOTE=LarparNar;34973625], shoot it into the sun,[/QUOTE] why we no giant rockets that burn some kind of non poluting fuel that launch our trash into the sun
[QUOTE=Concur;34974167]why we no giant rockets that burn some kind of non poluting fuel that launch our trash into the sun[/QUOTE] Lol rockets usually burn liquid hydrogen or oxygen. Which are definitely non-polluting.
then why we no blast everything into space, /ideas i had when 12/
[QUOTE=Concur;34974318]then why we no blast everything into space, /ideas i had when 12/[/QUOTE] Because right now it's expensive. Doesn't mean it always will be.
[QUOTE=hoodoo456;34973516]Yes, find a way to dispose of the nuclear waste that'll take hundreds of thousands of years to become entirely harmless. You're fooling yourself if you ever think we'll be able to do that.[/QUOTE] It's not like this waste would be a common thing, you can get a lot of life out of nuclear fuel before it becomes considered waste. Even then, I heard the French were developing some sort of reactor that could even use that stuff. If you want to clear massive fields to fit the solar panels/wind turbines that would be necessary to output the same power as a nuke plant, be my guest. I just figured it'd be awfully hypocritical to wipe out entire ecosystems to fit your "clean energy source". Also, you'd better pray that its sunny/windy every day.
how to solve nuclear problem: step one: store stuff in yucca mountain step two: 200 years from now when space is cheap we build the yucca mountain space center step three: send waste into jupiter
[QUOTE=Super_Noodle;35003757]It's not like this waste would be a common thing, you can get a lot of life out of nuclear fuel before it becomes considered waste. Even then, I heard the French were developing some sort of reactor that could even use that stuff. If you want to clear massive fields to fit the solar panels/wind turbines that would be necessary to output the same power as a nuke plant, be my guest. I just figured it'd be awfully hypocritical to wipe out entire ecosystems to fit your "clean energy source". Also, you'd better pray that its sunny/windy every day.[/QUOTE] You realize we can put wind turbines and solar panels in the ocean right? If we dotted the coast with them all around the world, there'd be enough power to power everything in the world. The current problem is that solar power is extremely expensive, personal solar power is around $6-7 per watt. A lightbulb uses around 40watts at a time iirc so, not very efficient. Wind Generators work great on the ocean though.
[QUOTE=Tukimoshi;35123645]You realize we can put wind turbines and solar panels in the ocean right? If we dotted the coast with them all around the world, there'd be enough power to power everything in the world. The current problem is that solar power is extremely expensive, personal solar power is around $6-7 per watt. A lightbulb uses around 40watts at a time iirc so, not very efficient. Wind Generators work great on the ocean though.[/QUOTE] You do realize that with personal solar powering you do not use conventional bulbs, you will use 12v led bulbs and things like the so, that uses WAY less watts than a conventional one. Yes it is expensive to build a proper self-maintaining solar power station, but you have to be efficient and then you'll save tons of money. Solar power is very efficient with the right equipment. Not to brag, but I have classes in this domain.
[QUOTE=WolvesSoulZ;35123732]You do realize that with personal solar powering you do not use conventional bulbs, you will use 12v led bulbs and things like the so, that uses WAY less watts than a conventional one. Yes it is expensive to build a proper self-maintaining solar power station, but you have to be efficient and then you'll save tons of money. Solar power is very efficient with the right equipment. Not to brag, but I have classes in this domain.[/QUOTE] Yes, I was just trying to demonstrate how expensive solar power is. Not everyone is gonna convert to LED Bulbs, etc etc. Computers will still draw lots of powers, along with our washers and dryers, our TVs, etc. Lightbulbs are very minimal on the consumption side, I was just showing how to power a single lightbulb, it could cost hundreds of dollars. I'm no expert in solar panels. Anyways, The Nissan Leaf is pretty nifty. If you're old and have money, it'd be a perfect car for puttering around town in. Safe, Economical, Rarely needs maintenance. A shame that their battery distance needs to be improved. My friend who works at Nissan drove one, driving 2km, it dropped the battery range by 20km.
[QUOTE=WolvesSoulZ;35123732]You do realize that with personal solar powering you do not use conventional bulbs, you will use 12v led bulbs and things like the so, that uses WAY less watts than a conventional one. Yes it is expensive to build a proper self-maintaining solar power station, but you have to be efficient and then you'll save tons of money. Solar power is very efficient with the right equipment. Not to brag, but I have classes in this domain.[/QUOTE] I hope those light bulbs give you enough left over power to power dishwashers, washing machines, ovens, aircon, heat, or anything else you might be using in the vast multitude of everyday house electronics. And again, I hope where you chose to live is a very sunny place. You'd better also hope that it doesn't snow there, because I don't know how well solar panels work with a few inches of snow on top of them. Speaking of weather, how well do you think solar panels hold up to a bad hail storm? How well would they hold up to being frozen and thawed several times? Solar power just isn't practical. Not only is it not a constant source of power, but it just can't compete with the amount of power a nuke plant can put out. Look at it this way: Golmud Solar Park is the largest solar field in the world. It can output a max of 200MW of power and has an annual average of 317GWh. Three Mile Island is that nuke plant that everyone made a big deal about when one of its reactors failed. It is still operating on the other, undamaged reactor, and can put out four times as much power (800MW) and has an annual average of 6,645GWh. Despite all this green, environmental nonsense everyone has adopted lately, our power consumption is still going up. Solar power isn't enough to meet the growing demand.
[QUOTE=Super_Noodle;35139680]I hope those light bulbs give you enough left over power to power dishwashers, washing machines, ovens, aircon, heat, or anything else you might be using in the vast multitude of everyday house electronics. And again, I hope where you chose to live is a very sunny place. You'd better also hope that it doesn't snow there, because I don't know how well solar panels work with a few inches of snow on top of them. Speaking of weather, how well do you think solar panels hold up to a bad hail storm? How well would they hold up to being frozen and thawed several times? Solar power just isn't practical. Not only is it not a constant source of power, but it just can't compete with the amount of power a nuke plant can put out. Look at it this way: Golmud Solar Park is the largest solar field in the world. It can output a max of 200MW of power and has an annual average of 317GWh. Three Mile Island is that nuke plant that everyone made a big deal about when one of its reactors failed. It is still operating on the other, undamaged reactor, and can put out four times as much power (800MW) and has an annual average of 6,645GWh. Despite all this green, environmental nonsense everyone has adopted lately, our power consumption is still going up. Solar power isn't enough to meet the growing demand.[/QUOTE] Ahh well from a guy who has got his classes to be qualified at making whole solar system on whole hunting camps of a few cabins and the like, I can assure you that with a bit of calculus, moderation, and well, just plain having the right equipment, you can make it worth it for your home/cabin. How? Batteries and good management. Snow? Not a problem, I come from the north so we've been qualified to deal with that, how? It's all in the angle and right placement. You can power everything you'd find in your household. And if you really wanted to be efficient, you can take most things in 12v too. But I agree, it's not efficient unless you build a new house or cabin, it'll cost you at least 4000 to get starter for a few things, to at least save tons on your current bill, and at least 9000 if you want to be 100% self-efficient, for a common house. And I'm not a green guy at all, so I way prefer hunting camps with good ol' gasoline generator. BUT then again, for case like this, if you are ready to invest, solar ain't a bad idea. I don't care if it's about the demand as a whole, I'm just stating facts for personal or commercial uses, as that's what I had training in, not for whole cities, because then I just don't care. Either way, I'll stick to hydroelectricity.
The fact of the matter is that with a small amount of solar panels/wind turbines on the coast, we could power the world. However, the price for that small amount would be astronomically high, just like how gas will be astronomically high in price once we get dangerously low on oil. I'm wary of Nuclear Power because as we find areas to place the waste, we create more of it. We've learned from the Oil Crisis that using a limited/time-restricted resource is a bad idea. Launching it into space is even worse because even the smallest space debris can destroy a ship at the speeds they need to leave the atmosphere.
I'm sure that we humans, will end up coming with a decent alternative in the future, I mean, we made the world as we know it now, many good inventions, yet there are some flaws, but nothing can be perfect. Let's hope for the best.
Pretty neat that it can go 90 in reverse. I gotta admit, if it had a long range or a bigass solar cell on the roof that'd actually be able to charge it when you put it in park. I'd probably buy one if I could afford it.
[QUOTE=Second-gear-of-mgear;35153289]Pretty neat that it can go 90 in reverse. I gotta admit, if it had a long range or a bigass solar cell on the roof that'd actually be able to charge it when you put it in park. I'd probably buy one if I could afford it.[/QUOTE] It doesn't currently have a long range?
Like 200 miles or something with feather feet. I have a bit of a lead foot. For a city car, it honestly seems perfect though. I could care less about engine sound since most new cars are super insulated anyways.
[QUOTE=Second-gear-of-mgear;35153545]Like 200 miles or something with feather feet. I have a bit of a lead foot. For a city car, it honestly seems perfect though. I could care less about engine sound since most new cars are super insulated anyways.[/QUOTE] According to Tesla, the largest battery on the Model S does 300 miles with an average speed of 55 mph. They say that testing shows that it does much more in city driving, because the regen system loves stop-and-go traffic. [editline]15th March 2012[/editline] It all depends on how heavy you're on the throttle though, as you say, so it will be interesting to see what the figures are when we start getting reviews and stuff.
[QUOTE=LarparNar;35153675]According to Tesla, the largest battery on the Model S does 300 miles with an average speed of 55 mph.[/QUOTE] that sounds... perfect
[QUOTE=The Decoy;35172729]that sounds... perfect[/QUOTE] They're generally off with testing though. Top Gear has had very varied results with testing electric cars, from 20km using 100km of charge, to the nearest charging station being 40km away (When you have 7km of charge left). My friend works at Nissan and drove a Leaf, in 30km he used 80km worth of range. They aren't that accurate. Batteries need to improve drastically for them to be worth it.
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