• Time Travel
    204 replies, posted
I'm guessing all of you wanted time travel at least once in your lifetime. And guess what? It's hypothetically possible without the use of wormholes, black holes or cosmic strings. "How is this incredible feat possible then, Yahnich who happens to have a large penis?" you may ask. Well, by using the technology that just keep giving. Fucking lasers. They gave us cloud seeding, fusion and a funny way to entertain cats. And a legendary man named Ronald Mallett, who basically has an unhealthy obsession with time travel, has made his list and checked it twice. Using lasers, he has found a theoretical way to stir the space-time continuum itself. How he has done this? By using Einstein's legendary mass-energy equivalence formula, E=mc². Read what this modern-day Faraday has to say: [quote="Ronald Mallett"]“Einstein showed that mass and energy are the same thing,” said Mallett, who published his first research on time travel in 2000 in Physics Letters. “The time machine we’ve designed uses light in the form of circulating lasers to warp or loop time instead of using massive objects.”[/quote] So basically what he did was, instead of raising the mass high enough to warp time itself, he adds more energy, which should theoretically cause time to warp. He is currently carrying out experiments, called the The Space-time Twisting by Light (STL) experiment. In this experiment, he passes a free neutron into, quite literally, the circle of light. If the neutron has a mean decay time higher than anticipated, which would be more than 15 minutes, this would mean that there's a chance that time itself has been slowed. Or that the neutrons decided to be a bitch and not decay. Even so, possible or not, this way of time travel has one flaw. You can only travel to the time the machine was turned on. This mean if they make a working machine on December 29th 2012, you had no choice than to go there. However, I think it's safe to assume that these machines will not work forever, thus after a certain number of years, it will break down and pretty much screw the future people over. This is how the time machine would look like: [img]http://www.abc.net.au/science/slab/wormholes/img/timemachine.jpg[/img] The genius himself [img]http://www.uncg.edu/ure/news/stories/2006/Jan/images/mallett.png[/img]
He better be careful. I don't want some guy breaking my universe. I like not being all non-existy.
Doubtful that this will work, tbh.
If time travel was possible, i think we would have some kind of records in the history that some futuristic guy came and said "Oh Hejo, im korean!". And then fucked up the whole time line.
Wouldn't this require, you know, unimaginable amounts of energy? On the other hand, it's just for a neutron, so it shouldn't be much... Too much, at least. Also, Causality violations.
So if you can only travel back to the date it was switched on, has humanity just invented a gigantic 'savegame' button?
[QUOTE=GranaMan;22313797]If time travel was possible, i think we would have some kind of records in the history that some futuristic guy came and said "Oh Hejo, im korean!". And then fucked up the whole time line.[/QUOTE] This is prevented by the fact that you can't go to the middle ages, because the time travel machine wasn't turned on. @Eudoxia: About the violation of causality, I honestly have no idea. Energy, it requires a certain amount of energy to create a fixed time loop, so anything within that travels through time. The time loop is what makes it possible basically, it extends, but you get 'teleported' through the loop back to its starting point. @Northern: Yes.
Rather optimistic if you ask me, would probably take massive amounts of energy or some shit, since it's never as easy as science articles make it sound.
He's estimating that it'll take about a decade to finish the experiments, followed by another decade or two to actually make a plausible machine.
Schweeeeet. brb fighting dangerous animals.
So we need to travel faster than 88mph?
Of course time travel is possible, I do it every day. I hope they cause some Primer shit.
Wait, do I miss something here? This doesn't allow time travel. It just slows down time for the object that is inside of the stream. It allows an object to prevent it's current state. The only thing to experience time traveling would be the object itself, so for an observator outside of the system time runs normally. Basicly the same thing as circeling a massive object.
If we ever do achieve time travel we'll really have to consider fate and destiny on scientific grounds. Either paradoxes will pop up left, right and centre, our time travelers will suddenly wind up in a parallel universe if they so much as breathe wrong, or everything carries on as normal because it's all pre-destined. At which point free will goes off the deep end and into the ether. Edit. But actually, this has some pretty cool potential applications. Sending objects (like us) back in time would require implausible quantities of energy, but what about electrons? Hey presto, computers which give you the answer before you ask the question! Heh heh...
[QUOTE=QwertySecond;22314168]If we ever do achieve time travel we'll really have to consider fate and destiny on scientific grounds. Either paradoxes will pop up left, right and centre, our time travelers will suddenly wind up in a parallel universe if they so much as breathe wrong, or everything carries on as normal because it's all pre-destined. At which point free will goes off the deep end and into the ether.[/QUOTE] There is no such thing as free will anyways so why worry?
[IMG]http://images.starcraftmazter.net/4chan/for_forums/this_thread_again.jpg[/IMG]
[QUOTE=QwertySecond;22314168]If we ever do achieve time travel we'll really have to consider fate and destiny on scientific grounds. Either paradoxes will pop up left, right and centre, our time travelers will suddenly wind up in a parallel universe if they so much as breathe wrong, or everything carries on as normal because it's all pre-destined. At which point free will goes off the deep end and into the ether.[/QUOTE] That's not a problem. The past is the past and the future is the future. Nothing will change that. If someone uses the time travel machine you will see them come out from it at the time they come to the place. Meaning they have always had an existence in that time, before they used the time machine, because the time machine places them there. It's not possible to convince a person to not time travel if you have seen him time-travel, the fact that he time traveled proves that. But that is of course just how I see it because it's highly more logical than the "oh but what if I killed him" shit. He wouldn't be there if you did that.
[QUOTE=Yahnich;22313993]He's estimating that it'll take about a decade to finish the experiments, followed by another decade or two to actually make a plausible machine.[/QUOTE] Still sounds optimistic. Or I'm just pessimistic.
I decided a while ago that if I ever invented time travel, I would go and visit myself on the 1st January 2006. I never turned up, so I can safely assume I won't invent time travel in my lifetime.
People have done science on that dgg. [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Novikov_self-consistency_principle[/url]
I read somewhere that if we could travel the speed of light, we could simulate time stopping altogether. I may have been completely wasted at the time though.
This is heavy.
Awesome, is it possible to go forward in time so I can meet myself in the future?
[QUOTE=NorthernFall;22313887]So if you can only travel back to the date it was switched on, has humanity just invented a gigantic 'savegame' button?[/QUOTE] Holy shit. You right.
Once we discover how to safely time travel we're just going to fuck up the time line anyway.
Not necessarily. We don't know how time truly works yet. It might be that all events in spacetime are more-or-less fixed (with the possibility of some events being "dislodged" by events of a certain undiscovered chrono-chaotic nature) in the timeline, a theory often termed determinism. (the bracketed bits are just speculative theory) Either that or we could just develop an International Chrono-Defense Initiative, like that movie Timecop.
[QUOTE=ironman17;22315459]Not necessarily. We don't know how time truly works yet. It might be that all events in spacetime are more-or-less fixed (with the possibility of some events being "dislodged" by events of a certain undiscovered chrono-chaotic nature) in the timeline, a theory often termed determinism. (the bracketed bits are just speculative theory) Either that or we could just develop an International Chrono-Defense Initiative, like that movie Timecop.[/QUOTE] I personally don't believe anything is set in stone. (thus not believing in "fixed" events) And I'm talking about people changing the timeline for their own selfish gain. I could see it happening.
Well, you're free to believe in a free timeline. But it's one of the few freedoms we have, in my opinion, and it's only a freedom so long as you don't believe free will to be an illusion, that there's no fate but what we make. I don't have the luxury of believing it, since I think all things were, are, and will be. Although I am open to believing that some points in a timeline could be more brittle and easier to disrupt, so if you're in the right place at the right time IN the right time, you might be able to create an obstruction in the timestream, and prompt a change along the timeline, hopefully having certain events required for the paradox to occur being immovable, such as your own lifeline stretching from the instant of your birth to the instant of the paradox. Just my two pence on the matter.
Great Scott!
Time is very interesting, even if it's a science that's partially beyond modern humans.
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