• General Adulthood, Planning for the Future: Business, College, Budgeting, Investments, etc! $$$
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[QUOTE=LennyPenny;52963814]Well all European degrees are standardized and are pretty much universally accepted so that won't be a problem either way What other benefits does "study abroad" give you? (Curious because the US doesn't really financially aid students - why would they help students that don't even study inside the US)[/QUOTE] Well the main benefit is that it's exactly like getting a regular degree in America, so I wouldn't have to take any more General Education classes because I'm going to be finished with my AA through Community College soon.
[QUOTE=LennyPenny;52963814]Well all European degrees are standardized and are pretty much universally accepted so that won't be a problem either way What other benefits does "study abroad" give you? ([B]Curious because the US doesn't really financially aid students - why would they help students that don't even study inside the US[/B])[/QUOTE] Eh not really. If you have good grades and low means there's quite a bit of aid available from the govt and schools. [QUOTE=Destroyox;52964189]Well the main benefit is that it's exactly like getting a regular degree in America, so I wouldn't have to take any more General Education classes because I'm going to be finished with my AA through Community College soon.[/QUOTE] I'm in the exact same position. The main downside really with Europe is transferrability of credits if you've got an AA (assuming language stuff is dealt with.) Me personally I plan on moving, but I'm largely planning on finishing my bachelors in America and doing PhD/MD education/work in another country, just for time-efficiency purposes. Albeit, I'm still gonna apply to a couple of places and see what they're willing to give me. Although it sounds like you may be expecting to do your degree through study-abroad, at an American university? I'm not entirely sure if that's what the program is for. It's something to send you over for a semester or two, and then the credits you earn are kept in America, but it usually is beneficial to your degree since it makes you look good. And if you actually do wind up fully wanting to move to Germany, having connections/friends will make it so much easier and safe.
[QUOTE=thelurker1234;52964829]The main downside really with Europe is transferrability of credits if you've got an AA (assuming language stuff is dealt with.) Me personally I plan on moving, but I'm largely planning on finishing my bachelors in America and doing PhD/MD education/work in another country, just for time-efficiency purposes. Albeit, I'm still gonna apply to a couple of places and see what they're willing to give me. Although it sounds like you may be expecting to do your degree through study-abroad, at an American university? I'm not entirely sure if that's what the program is for. It's something to send you over for a semester or two, and then the credits you earn are kept in America, but it usually is beneficial to your degree since it makes you look good. And if you actually do wind up fully wanting to move to Germany, having connections/friends will make it so much easier and safe.[/QUOTE] Yeah I get the degree in America but I can do semesters overseas. I figured having an American degree would still count for something, right?
Anybody have any advise for getting a job with good experience but no qualifications? Feels like I'm getting turned down everywhere although I've got 9 years solid in the defence industry through an apprenticeship. I've got an incredibly sexy CV, but most places just want me to submit via a form which takes all my presentation and work out of it, anybody had any success with LinkedIn?
[QUOTE=LennyPenny;52963814]Well all European degrees are standardized and are pretty much universally accepted so that won't be a problem either way What other benefits does "study abroad" give you? ([B]Curious because the US doesn't really financially aid students[/B] - why would they help students that don't even study inside the US)[/QUOTE] yes hi please don't say things that are literally false pell grants, stafford loans among others
[QUOTE=Destroyox;52964846]Yeah I get the degree in America but I can do semesters overseas. I figured having an American degree would still count for something, right?[/QUOTE] American degrees from decent schools are pretty well regarded, you don't really have to worry about that. If your goal at that point is to still move to Germany, there's two main paths I'm aware of. 1. If you have a desirable degree, you can get a job fairly easily that will get you a 4 year work visa, which you can eventually transition into permanent residency and citizenship. You'll want to have great German knowledge for this of course. or 2. Do post-graduate shit there. Like a masters or PhD. Those programs are much more often conducted in English than bachelors stuff too, so you'll find it a bit easier to find something you want to do if language is a concern. You still have to figure out funding, but there [URL="https://www.daad.org/en/find-funding/graduate-opportunities/study-scholarship/"]are scholarships[/URL]. That's aside from weird paths that you'll probably already be aware of if they apply to you, such as if nazis revoked your citizenship, you're married to a German, plan on starting a business, etc..
iirc Germany abolished tuition fees for everyone a few years ago so you have that going for you. There is not really many English-taught programs though, unlike places like the Netherlands, so you would probably need to learn good German.
It's precisely why I'm getting my minor in German.
[QUOTE=LordCrypto;52964920]yes hi please don't say things that are literally false pell grants, stafford loans among others[/QUOTE] Isn't pretty much anyone that goes to college in really heavy debt afterwards?
[QUOTE=LennyPenny;52967160]Isn't pretty much anyone that goes to college in really heavy debt afterwards?[/QUOTE] if you're not smart when it comes to your financing sure and if you go to a uber expensive school i'll owe somewhere around ~12k and repayments won't be required until i have a real job
[QUOTE=LennyPenny;52963814](Curious because the US doesn't really financially aid students[/QUOTE] This is not true. I work in Enrollment Services while in college and my boss is the scholarship director. There's literally thousands of unclaimed money in financial aid at every college because the students do not apply to get it. Mountains of free money sitting in easy scholarships.
I finished high school last year and now I'm officially an adult and also an undergraduate nursing student. Back then, I thought it would be a pretty big change in my life, although the only change I've noticed so far, is that chemistry is way harder than before, while beer still tastes like piss.
[QUOTE=OvB;52967293]This is not true. I work in Enrollment Services while in college and my boss is the scholarship director. There's literally thousands of unclaimed money in financial aid at every college because the students do not apply to get it. Mountains of free money sitting in easy scholarships.[/QUOTE] That's really interesting - any idea why nobody applies?
[QUOTE=LennyPenny;52967160]Isn't pretty much anyone that goes to college in really heavy debt afterwards?[/QUOTE] I finished my BS with zero debt. I am doing my MS right now and will finish with zero as well. [editline]11th December 2017[/editline] [QUOTE=LennyPenny;52967346]That's really interesting - any idea why nobody applies?[/QUOTE] Because it's horribly advertised and no one knows anything about them.
[QUOTE=LennyPenny;52967346]That's really interesting - any idea why nobody applies?[/QUOTE] Nobody know's about the university offered scholarships. We had to place flyers around campus because no one was applying.
I'm finishing with about $16,500, I think. Which isn't too bad and if I can find a job that pays at least $40k in the next few years, I should be able to pay it off relatively easily in hopefully two or three years. Going to university after age 24 helped a lot though. That's when you can claim yourself as an independent, regardless if you still live with your parents, and you get a lot more grants. At least I did! Could be worse lol.
[QUOTE=Pascall;52967903]Going to university after age 24 helped a lot though. That's when you can claim yourself as an independent, regardless if you still live with your parents, and you get a lot more grants. At least I did!.[/QUOTE] Been taking advantage of this too and it's the greatest thing ever. Combined with money I get from Workforce WV, I'm getting a free ride through state college. It all comes down to knowing what's available to you, and of course, a bit of luck.
[QUOTE=LennyPenny;52967160]Isn't pretty much anyone that goes to college in really heavy debt afterwards?[/QUOTE]Depends how they do it. If you utilize aid properly and go to good schools you can graduate with pretty minimal debt. Also loans can count as aid imo, since federal loans are usually pretty generous and due to the college wage premium it's one of the safest and most reliable things you can do financially. [QUOTE=LennyPenny;52967346]That's really interesting - any idea why nobody applies?[/QUOTE] High schools do an awful job at letting people know what their options for the future are. They basically tried shoving us all into 4 year applications immediately, for example in my class. At least, that's where I put the blame. There isn't exactly an economic reason that college debt should be as much of a problem as it is. [QUOTE=LordCrypto;52967232]if you're not smart when it comes to your financing sure and if you go to a uber expensive school i'll owe somewhere around ~12k and repayments won't be required until i have a real job[/QUOTE] And hell, depending on the school and your grades/means, a really expensive school can actually be the cheapest of them all. [URL]https://college.harvard.edu/financial-aid/net-price-calculator[/URL] Take a look at this for example, a school that normally costs [B]70k[/B] a year. But, if we put in the details for an alright middle class income of 60k, I get this financial aid estimation. [thumb]https://cloud.zarth.xyz/s/ubHbYq4A3lNlXoR/download[/thumb] Basically, you pay nothing directly, and you do some part-time work for the school for the rest (bonus: most student jobs tend to have great flexible hours too.) Private non-profit schools often have pretty high up-front costs, but they also tend to have a lot more money to give too so they are least worth looking at to see what they'll offer.
i'll be graduating with around 12k or so in loans, which kinda bites but with the job i got after i graduate i only need to use about 10% of my income per paycheck and i can pay off my loan in less than 2 years
Going to college/Uni all depends on what career you are going into Going into STEM? You better go into fucking uni. Planning to do photography, Culinary, arts related industries? Don't waste your money, you're better off taking a business management degree and using that to help your skill if you plan on opening your own business. Too often people go school because 'everyone says they have to' That's bullshit.
i need some serious career advice. so i graduated uni back in august and i still havent even begun to look for jobs yet. theres a couple of concerns but i'm getting stuck into job hunting after xmas (forced 2 weeks holidays so fuck it might as well do something productive). firstly i don't know what kind of job i could go into. i graduated with a bachelors in IT majoring in software development, but i've never applied anything i learned from uni in a real life scenario, and if i had to i wouldn't remember too much. i can program, and i am great at problem solving which has gotten me this far in life. second concern is i do a lot of drugs and i don't want to go through the whole interview process just to be stopped at a drug test. before you ask, i'm not gonna stop doing drugs. so i'm wondering how common drug testing is in the industries i could go into. i mean even if i stopped doing drugs from today until i get a job, there will definitely be something left in my blood for the next couple months.
[QUOTE=Pat.Lithium;52968745] second concern is i do a lot of drugs and i don't want to go through the whole interview process just to be stopped at a drug test. before you ask, i'm not gonna stop doing drugs. so i'm wondering how common drug testing is in the industries i could go into. i mean even if i stopped doing drugs from today until i get a job, there will definitely be something left in my blood for the next couple months.[/QUOTE] Unless you work for the Gov or get contracted for the Gov, companies aren't going to be asking for blood test all the time. Its inconvenient and a waste of time. Put up your resume on linkedin and get references?
[QUOTE=Ignhelper;52968752]Unless you work for the Gov or get contracted for the Gov, companies aren't going to be asking for blood test all the time. Its inconvenient and a waste of time. Put up your resume on linkedin and get references?[/QUOTE] thats what i figured, but i also figured that large companies might do a drug test, especially for security related work with banks and shit. i made a linkin when i graduated, got a few references but no IT related ones. i do do a lot of IT work in my current job as a receptionist (outside of the job description).
[QUOTE=Pat.Lithium;52968745]i need some serious career advice. so i graduated uni back in august and i still havent even begun to look for jobs yet. theres a couple of concerns but i'm getting stuck into job hunting after xmas (forced 2 weeks holidays so fuck it might as well do something productive). firstly i don't know what kind of job i could go into. i graduated with a bachelors in IT majoring in software development, but i've never applied anything i learned from uni in a real life scenario, and if i had to i wouldn't remember too much. i can program, and i am great at problem solving which has gotten me this far in life. second concern is i do a lot of drugs and i don't want to go through the whole interview process just to be stopped at a drug test. before you ask, i'm not gonna stop doing drugs. so i'm wondering how common drug testing is in the industries i could go into. i mean even if i stopped doing drugs from today until i get a job, there will definitely be something left in my blood for the next couple months.[/QUOTE] I mean you are a natural problem solver and already know how to program, which is like one the most important/sought after skill combinations at the moment. If applying your programming skills to "real life scenarios" is a concern or a real problem for you just do an iternship for a few months If you are confident in your skills you can probably pick and choose a job as a software engineer at any firm that floats your boat Or just open a software business yourself if you got cool ideas and something saved up
[QUOTE=Pat.Lithium;52968855]thats what i figured, but i also figured that large companies might do a drug test, especially for security related work with banks and shit. i made a linkin when i graduated, got a few references but no IT related ones. i do do a lot of IT work in my current job as a receptionist (outside of the job description).[/QUOTE] if you're close to touching finances or personal information, don't do drugs
As you guys know, I got a Marketing Director job about a week or two ago, and boy oh boy I got myself into a mess with this one. The school has been tanking hard for several years, but I didn't know exactly how hard, and they expect the Marketing Department to pull them out of the rut. The problem is we don't have the budget to do proper marketing. My competition has a monthly marketing budget that's twice my yearly budget. I honestly am going to try my hardest to fix the school, but I don't see it happening without either a money infusion, or some angel investor building an entirely new campus in a location that is visible to the naked eye so we don't have to spend nearly as much money to get attention. [editline]14th December 2017[/editline] That was a rant. I honestly think I can do the job but without full support from literally every staff member at the school it's going to be difficult.
[QUOTE=LennyPenny;52970550]I mean you are a natural problem solver and already know how to program, which is like one the most important/sought after skill combinations at the moment. If applying your programming skills to "real life scenarios" is a concern or a real problem for you just do an iternship for a few months If you are confident in your skills you can probably pick and choose a job as a software engineer at any firm that floats your boat Or just open a software business yourself if you got cool ideas and something saved up[/QUOTE] i dunno if i'd be able to afford to do an internship for a few months unless i was still working part time. i mean i'm probably just going to update my resume and apply everywhere i can when i get my pc back.
Said this a million times already but try and find local coder/technology meetups (via meetup.com for example) Then just chat with people, show off a bit and ask them where they work - if it sounds cool just ask if they are looking for coders
Does anyone knows what generally happens when an entire class of students fails or barely passes a college course? Long-story short, I've had a nightmare of a biology class and this should be my last semester at community college, but this one course is just a huge obstacle for me and everyone taking it. Even people who are majoring in scientific fields, studying 20+ hours a week, and asking the teacher for help aren't getting much help and aren't getting good grades on their exams. About a quarter of the students dropped by November, a few of us are hoping to get a D at best while others are ripping their hair out since it's the only class between them and the programs they want to get into.
[QUOTE=BrandoJack;52977025]Does anyone knows what generally happens when an entire class of students fails or barely passes a college course? Long-story short, I've had a nightmare of a biology class and this should be my last semester at community college, but this one course is just a huge obstacle for me and everyone taking it. Even people who are majoring in scientific fields, studying 20+ hours a week, and asking the teacher for help aren't getting much help and aren't getting good grades on their exams. About a quarter of the students dropped by November, a few of us are hoping to get a D at best while others are ripping their hair out since it's the only class between them and the programs they want to get into.[/QUOTE] I think it depends on the college. If the college is infamous for its high drop outs then that's something you should have considered before registering. If that's a rarity then administration will pick up on it and probably do an investigation to see if the professor or something else is at fault, chances are most of the students in the class are calling for action so I'd recommend touching base with them. Or worst case scenario it's just a tough course and things are just business as usual (i.e. gl;hf). When I was at college I did have a couple of courses that I didn't do as well I'd like to have done so I just tried to do better in my other courses to make up for the difference. You may just have to squeeze by on a pass and accept it as is.
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