• Git vs. SVN
    40 replies, posted
Personally, I feel that SVN is a better choice for me because I am the only one working on it, but I still use Git because of GitHub's nice stuff. Some info about these: Git and SVN are version control systems for managing code. They both have the ability to save multiple revisions of each file. SVN has a central server, and the client sends a commit of code to the server. Git has a central server, but you clone the servers repository to your computer, and commit to that, than sync that to the central server. SVN uses numbers (ie r1, r105, r142319843124321) to mark revisions, and they go in order. Git uses weird hash tags.
Using SVN at the moment. Considering switching to Git, but I don't think any of the advantages it has would be any use to me.
[quote=" An Admin "] • Posts/Threads: Don’t post just to proclaim your stance on the topic. An effort when making posts is required, we have higher-standards here. The OP also needs to be well-written instead of some two-liner shit.[/quote] With that being said. I have no idea what Git is. I still would prefer SVN since I don't like to try out new things, and I often stay on page one happy that way.
Mercurial is best(est) in my opinion because it supports a bunch of features (i like the local push, then the push to the main repo from your local repo.), as well as being piss easy to use Is this a thread about version control generally or git and svn specifically?
Git, it's very flexible, I can for example set up a bare Git repository in a Dropbox folder, then push/pull from that.
Git support sucks on windows
Local commits are the biggest advantage I can think of, really, and branching. I think Torvalds once said he didn't think of git as a VCS but as a filesystem when he designed it, and I think that design really works. Everything you have from commits to files is an object. And it's decentralized, which might be a pro in itself. I prefer git but SVN has its good sides as well, such as being simply and quickly deployable and easy for the end-user.
I'm still using SVN until a decent GIT solution is released for Windows.
I've been using SVN for a long time now (thanks to Gmod addons and such), and I really like how easy it is to use (with TortoiseSVN), although all the .svn folders can get pretty annoying. Git seems really really confusing to me, and being a windows user, I could easily notice Git was made for Linux, not for Windows. That's why I currently prefer SVN.
[QUOTE=Richy19;32376918]Git support sucks on windows[/QUOTE] Not really, you just have to use a terminal. Git isn't designed to be used from a GUI. Most of its advanced functions are desgined to be used from a CLI [editline]19th September 2011[/editline] [QUOTE=garry;32376946]I'm still using SVN until a decent GIT solution is released for Windows.[/QUOTE] By which you probably mean "proper IDE integration", am I correct?
I really prefer Git (and other DVCS) since there's no need for a server to do your work, a Git repository is a stand-alone repository and you can push to any other repository, much better than SVN's Client -> Server model.
[QUOTE=garry;32376946]I'm still using SVN until a decent GIT solution is released for Windows.[/QUOTE] Have you tried tortoisegit? The tortoise series of tools seems to be pretty good for version control on windows
[QUOTE=Icedshot;32376988]Have you tried tortoisegit? The tortoise series of tools seems to be pretty good for version control on windows[/QUOTE]TortoiseGit is terrible, I've just been using Cygwin and Git alone, along with a 'Open Git Shell Here' shortcut in Explorer.
TortoiseGIT still uses the ass backwards Cygwin stuff IIRC. It isn't so much a windows version of GIT, as a Linux emulator running GIT.
TortiseGit works very well for me, only downside is no IDE stuff
[QUOTE=Richy19;32376918]Git support sucks on windows[/QUOTE] This is my experience as well. The interface just seems overly technical compared to SVN, specifically TortoiseSVN which I believe most of us are somewhat familiar with. I'm sure it comes with loads of advantages over subversion, but for projects of the size that I work with (usually not more than 3 people), it just doesn't seem worth the effort to switch to a much more complicated tool.
[QUOTE=danharibo;32377013]TortoiseGit is terrible, I've just been using Cygwin and Git alone, along with a 'Open Git Shell Here' shortcut in Explorer.[/QUOTE] Really? Shame, tortoisesvn and tortoisehg have both worked really well for me, so it was just a stab in the dark that tortoisegit wouldn't be awful
[QUOTE=Icedshot;32377054]Really? Shame, tortoisesvn and tortoisehg have both worked really well for me, so it was just a stab in the dark that tortoisegit wouldn't be awful[/QUOTE]It is just tortoisesvn patched to work with Git, and a few extra forms. The patchwork shows.
[QUOTE=danharibo;32377092]It is just tortoisesvn patched to work with Git, and a few extra forms. The patchwork shows.[/QUOTE] That's true, but it's not like it doesn't work. You do have to touch the console to get it to work (for example setting up github I had to do it), but normally you can just use the GUI and it's easy to use.
In terms of the actual systems I like to think that simply SVN is simpler but GIT gives more control to the developers. I like the idea of local repositories connect to a central one but then I think that maybe it would just be easier to use SVN.
[QUOTE=neos300;32377118]That's true, but it's not like it doesn't work. You do have to touch the console to get it to work (for example setting up github I had to do it), but normally you can just use the GUI and it's easy to use.[/QUOTE]It does work yes, I just found I preferred the CLI to using tortoisegit so I stick with that instead.
as a rule I think that git is more useful to the programmers & devs whilst SVN is more useful to the end-use/client correct me if I'm wrong
TortoiseGit works fine for me. I installed the official Git For Windows, got the TortoiseGit version that integrates with PuTTY and GFW instead of anything else, adjusted PuTTY's default settings to autoload my key without a password and it's just as easy to use as TortoiseSVN. The main reason I prefer Git to SVN is that SVN repos instantly destroy themselves if you dare delete or rename files without doing it through SVN, and I've never been able to undestroy a repo without losing all my changes. [editline]19th September 2011[/editline] To qualify, you have to tell SVN exactly what you've done as you do it, whereas with Git you say "I've done some stuff, go find out what it was." I love that.
I'm mainly using msysgit myself, it works rather well as long as you're not afraid to run some shell commands every now and then. I'm hoping for better IDE integration though, GitHub and such just makes it that much more awesome than SVN.
I prefer SVN as it is much easier to set up, specially in Windows, The only downside of it in my opinion is that it fills your project folder with .svn files
[QUOTE=Eltro102;32377268]as a rule I think that git is more useful to the programmers & devs whilst SVN is more useful to the end-use/client correct me if I'm wrong[/QUOTE] What kind of end-user/client uses a source control system? :confused: Edit: I prefer SVN by the way. I'm much more experienced with it since we also use it at work and it has great Eclipse integration.
[QUOTE=Robber;32378224]I prefer SVN by the way. I'm much more experienced with it since we also use it at work and it has [B]great Eclipse integration[/B].[/QUOTE] Wait, really? I tried it earlier and it kept corrupting my files when I tried to commit through Eclipse. Which doesn't really make sense...
I used to use SVN then I switched to Git. Never going back. What I like most is the ability to partially commit some changes (you can even just commit a single change in a file where you changed a bunch of stuff), the ability to commit locally (so you can work without internet) and GitHub in itself is a big reason to switch to Git. I use Git on windows, with mysisgit, and I love it. Having a bash shell in Windows is pretty cool, you don't need to use dir instead of ls and all that. I don't understand why programmers need a pretty interface for a source control system. The command line is powerful and as a programmer, you shouldn't be affraid of it.
[QUOTE=garry;32377038]TortoiseGIT still uses the ass backwards Cygwin stuff IIRC. It isn't so much a windows version of GIT, as a Linux emulator running GIT.[/QUOTE] Basically, so does TurtoiseSVN. Afaik, it just runs the svn exe and pipes input/output. [editline]19th September 2011[/editline] Personally, I prefer SVN. I don't need any of the extra features git has, SVN is simple and smooth enough for me.
About git integration with IDEs: Eclipse has EGit, it's pretty good as of recently. MonoDevelop just recently (2 weeks ago) added integration with Git, Visual Studio has GitExtensions (decent, but I can never get it to connect to my server), and some other plugin to get Solution explorer to show git details, I've never gotten it to work though. On Windows, msysgit is decent. EGit uses a Java implementation of git, JGit, and it seems to run well on Windows. I think MonoDevelop uses a C# implementation of git, not sure though. SVN would be fine if I were working on projects by myself. I use git because I have 6-7 friends that I work on different projects with and it's a lot easier to manage all the branching/merging with git (IMO)
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