• This arm looks awful
    25 replies, posted
[img]http://troll.ws/pPW4GG[/img] The hand is even worse. HELP.
study arms
study hands
study
stud
Pretty much what others have said. Look at pictures of arms, hands, etc. Draw them without tracing. Look at the shapes the lines make, how every bump and angle affects the shading. It's not copying, it's practicing. A lot of artists use gesture drawings to get the basic form and flow of the picture. Sketch it out within a short time limit - for a hand I like to make it about 10 or 15 seconds - and what you do is basically try your best to capture the very basic form of what you're trying to draw. Use simple lines and shapes. For example, a hand in a gesture might be some sort of box with five sticks protruding from it. It helps give you a feel of the structure. The good thing about arms and hands is that you can practice using yourself. Stretch out your arm, give it a nice pose, then draw it. Can't say that there's much more to it. Go to the "Creative works that doesn't deserve a thread" thread and keep drawing and posting your work for critique and tips. Good luck, have fun. [editline]edit[/editline] Please go to the thread I mentioned above; the guys there know [i]a lot[/i] more than I do, and you're more likely to get better advice.
"[I][B]STUDY[/B][/I]" Isn't the right word. PRACTICE!
Elbows too round, would not view.
[QUOTE=Sam 01 1;33075794][img]http://troll.ws/pPW4GG[/img] The hand is even worse. HELP.[/QUOTE]I would say to work on the overall shape of the arm. The part closest to the torso is good (even if the shoulder is badly out of joint), but the elbow shouldn't form a right angle and the arm needs to taper to the hand more. The hand is okay, but the side opposite the thumb is a bit off. [url=http://qinni.deviantart.com/art/Hand-Tutorial-Tips-Reference-187433101]Here[/url]'s a pretty good hand tutorial.
You draw hands and arms better than me at least.
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[QUOTE=Facehugger88;33082489]"[I][B]STUDY[/B][/I]" Isn't the right word. PRACTICE![/QUOTE] Study is the exact right word. How can you practice something you don't know?
try taking a picture of yourself doing the pose you want, and then go from there. If you don't have a cam, you can just go on google images, or even just doing the pose and feeling how it should be
Sit down in front of the mirror, or grab a bunch of photos off the net of un-obscured arms (meaning no clothing obscuring the anatomy), and take your time drawing the arms. If you spend an hour drawing 3-4 arms w/ hands included, that'd be fine. Taking your time is really important and beneficial; there seems to be this idea floating around the net that the faster you do things, the better you'll get, that everything needs to be timed. I've found that this isn't the case at all; while gesture drawing can be helpful, doing longer studies will be even more helpful. You can do like 10-20 minutes of gesture studies to start off before you begin drawing longer studies, but don't let the gesture work take up all of your time. Thoughtful analysis will pay off more in the long run. This will allow you to identify the mechanics of the arm, so you won't need more than a basic understanding of anatomy until much later. You can draw good figures without much more than a basic understanding of the skeletal surface points and bones. Also study how other artists (preferably from art history) draw arms.
[QUOTE=Sam 01 1;33075794][img]http://troll.ws/pPW4GG[/img] The hand is even worse. HELP.[/QUOTE] Looks great for hand jobs.
[QUOTE=Detlef;33084553]Study is the exact right word. How can you practice something you don't know?[/QUOTE] I can look at an arm all I want and say "Aw-yup, that's an arm. It has features." But that's not going to help me draw one better. They're both the right words, but practice outweighs study.
[t]http://fc06.deviantart.net/fs9/f/2006/342/2/5/Arms_and_Hands_Tutorial_by_Snigom.jpg[/t] [url=http://snigom.deviantart.com/art/Arms-and-Hands-Tutorial-44397669]Stolen from DA.[/url] Some reference photos [t]http://boughanfire.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/arm_flex_supinate.jpg[/t] [t]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5c/Arm_flex_pronate.jpg[/t] [t]http://www.johnlund.com/images/10284200752.jpg[/t] [t]http://www.societyofrobots.com/images/robot_arm_human.gif[/t] [t]http://www.prplastic.com/images/arm-lift-2b.jpg[/t] [t]http://www.cosmetic-surgery-revealed.com/images/arm.png[/t] [t]http://www1.american.edu/adonahue/imageTIH.JPG[/t] You also have an arm, which may serve some use to you.
[QUOTE=Dr. Evilcop;33094691] Some reference photos [t]http://boughanfire.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/arm_flex_supinate.jpg[/t] [t]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5c/Arm_flex_pronate.jpg[/t] You also have an arm, which may serve some use to you.[/QUOTE] [b]Energy arms![/b]
[QUOTE=Dr. Evilcop;33094691] [t]http://www.societyofrobots.com/images/robot_arm_human.gif[/t] [/QUOTE] Am I supposed to be viewing these pictures of the actual muscle any differently than regular pictures of arms? Every time I see something like this, I feel like I should be memorizing the way the muscles look and that I should know how they move with the arm and what not. That tends to throw me off sometimes...
[QUOTE=slayer20;33098147]Am I supposed to be viewing these pictures of the actual muscle any differently than regular pictures of arms? Every time I see something like this, I feel like I should be memorizing the way the muscles look and that I should know how they move with the arm and what not. That tends to throw me off sometimes...[/QUOTE] Looking at the muscle lets you know the underlying structure, and how the forms should overlap.
[img]http://filesmelt.com/dl/armmuscles.png[/img] I tried using it as a reference. I have some work to do I guess :v:
[QUOTE=slayer20;33098510][img]http://filesmelt.com/dl/armmuscles.png[/img] I tried using it as a reference. I have some work to do I guess :v:[/QUOTE] More importantly is to be less chicken-scratchy with your lines. Make one line per curve, and if it isn't right, then draw another right over it. But don't draw an inch, then double back, then draw the next inch, then double back again etc. etc. [editline]2nd November 2011[/editline] You just need to stay loose. Right now you're being too uptight about it and not actually understanding what you're drawing, just copying lines.
Stay loose :v: I also tried turning the arm into simple shapes. [img]http://filesmelt.com/dl/armmuscles_shapdes.png[/img] Elbows are kind of pointy...but turning the arms into ovals helped.
Don't forget to practice the underlying bone structure, the Ulna and Radius bones of the forearm is what determines most of your forearm's shape so knowing their form is as important as knowing the muscle that surrounds it.
[QUOTE=Facehugger88;33089621]I can look at an arm all I want and say "Aw-yup, that's an arm. It has features." But that's not going to help me draw one better. They're both the right words, but practice outweighs study.[/QUOTE] It isn't about them giving the wrong advice, you just don't understand what the term "study" means. (hint: it's not just looking)
[img]http://filesmelt.com/dl/armmuscles.png[/img][img]http://www.societyofrobots.com/images/robot_arm_human.gif[/img] Try looking between these two pictures and making a list of things on yours that are off from the original (example: in your drawing, the forearm is thicker than the upper arm, when it should be the other way around). Then redraw it and try to fix those mistakes. Then compare the new drawing to the reference, and do it again.
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