• Front right tire looks deflated?
    67 replies, posted
[QUOTE=TestECull;34729619]The maximum listed on the sidewall is the maximum pressure those tires can safely handle. Airing them up to that will mean, when things have warmed up you're running a higher pressure than the tires are structurally capable of. You're literally rolling on ticking time bombs, a blowout more of a "when" than "If" at this point. In your case some deviation from the sticker may be good, as apparently those Kumhos have far softer sidewalls than Subaru's engineers planned for, but running at 44PSI is just asking for trouble.[/QUOTE] The sidewalls are fairly stiff. Back when I ran rally I caught a few screws in my tires, when the air was completely out they looked like the tire that's low in the OP. I actually ran one like that a few times (total of ~50 miles) when it was like that because the rim was stuck on my hub. The only way I could tell it was flat is if I was going ~55mph and slowly went side to side. The car would sway a bit. You don't necessarily have to run it at the max PSI, but if you have a car that comes with a max pressure of 32/30 (front/rear) and buy a tire rated at 45 rather than the stock 35, you should be running at something more like 42/40. [QUOTE=bradley;34725074] [QUOTE=Super_Noodle;34723365]If the tire lost air abnormally fast, fixaflat that motherfucker.[/QUOTE] If you put fixaflat in that motherfucker be prepared to buy a new tire. I won't even touch a tire for repair if it's had fixaflat in it -- that stuff is explosive. And considering you have to light the glue for the patch inside the tire, this means I run the risk of losing some eyebrows at the least. Fuck that. It also makes the tire soft on the inside so often I can't patch one even if I take and wash it out. Fixaflat is stupid -- Go to wal-mart or some shit, have your shit fixed. It's often $10. Come on.[/QUOTE] I recommend Slime instead. I've used it on one tire on my car, a tire on an ATV I had a while ago, and on tons of lawn mower tires. If you put in too much, it can cause balance issues. It has formulas on the bottle to get the right amount to add. You jack up the car, deflate the tire, take out the inner valve stem thing, pump in the goop, put the stem back in, re-inflate the tire, and roll the tire around for a while. If you have a hole that is a decent size, you will notice the goop seep out through it until it plugs the hole.
Slime is the same way... Don't use any temporary flat sealers if you plan on keeping the tire or having it professionally patched. Please. I say this from everyone who has brought in a tire to my shop with sealant in it. It RUINS the tire on the inside. And it is ALL flammable -- ALL brands of flat sealer. We won't even do them anymore. Too much risk involved, we have to get the tire extremely clean inside and then try to grind the softened rubber without ruining it which happens 80% of the time we grind a tire with some flat-fixing chemical pumped in it. Just, please. No. Unless you're going to throw the tire away soon.
[QUOTE=bradley;34752907]Slime is the same way... Don't use any temporary flat sealers if you plan on keeping the tire or having it professionally patched. Please. I say this from everyone who has brought in a tire to my shop with sealant in it. It RUINS the tire on the inside. And it is ALL flammable -- ALL brands of flat sealer. We won't even do them anymore. Too much risk involved, we have to get the tire extremely clean inside and then try to grind the softened rubber without ruining it which happens 80% of the time we grind a tire with some flat-fixing chemical pumped in it. Just, please. No. Unless you're going to throw the tire away soon.[/QUOTE] I've always used Slime as a permanent fix for all my tires. ~3000 miles on my current car tire that has Slime in it, still has no leaks. My father used it in all the tires in his dump trailer and probably has similar mileage on them too. I'm not sure what kind of patching you do, but whenever I've had a puncture in my tire that wasn't something Slime could fix (a screw hole, nail whole, etc) we just put plugs in them. One of my tires had a plug in it for 10k miles or so before it wore down to the belt and we replaced it. I don't think I'd pay to actually have a tire 'professionally' repaired. Generally if a tire can't be repaired by Slime or a plug, it's not worth fixing. Tires are cheap where I live now, it's cheaper and easier to replace a tire than have it repaired.
$10 repair is cheaper than a $20 used tire. That's how it is here.
[QUOTE=bradley;34755120]$10 repair is cheaper than a $20 used tire. That's how it is here.[/QUOTE] When prices are that low, I'd rather just go for the used tire. Around here the tire prices vary. I think it's something like $20 for a decent tire, a bit more for a good one. I almost bought a set of Blizzak WS-50 tires with a couple hundred miles on them for $120, but they were a couple sizes bigger than the tires I usually run. I've never had the need to go out and pay someone to repair a tire. I've always plugged and slimed my tires. EDIT: Actually, I'm AWD and am supposed to have 4 matching tires with the same tread depth, so I'd just either plug or slime my tire depending on the leak. A plug kit is $5-10, slime is $6 for a tube (we buy it in a gallon for $30 and it lasts years upon years.)
[QUOTE=FordLord;34755320]When prices are that low, I'd rather just go for the used tire. Around here the tire prices vary. I think it's something like $20 for a decent tire, a bit more for a good one. I almost bought a set of Blizzak WS-50 tires with a couple hundred miles on them for $120, but they were a couple sizes bigger than the tires I usually run. I've never had the need to go out and pay someone to repair a tire. I've always plugged and slimed my tires.[/quote] LOL used tires. I couldn't trust them. Maybe it's because of what I'm driving, but I'd rather buy a new tire than cheap out on a used one that could have a broken cord that lets go in a turn and sends me barrel rolling into an orphanage. In all seriousness, no used tires on my truck. If I get a flat I get two sticker tires, and the one I was running becomes the spare. It may cost more, but I can trust a brand new tire far more than I can trust a used one. [QUOTE=FordLord;34752244]The sidewalls are fairly stiff. Back when I ran rally I caught a few screws in my tires, when the air was completely out they looked like the tire that's low in the OP. I actually ran one like that a few times (total of ~50 miles) when it was like that because the rim was stuck on my hub. The only way I could tell it was flat is if I was going ~55mph and slowly went side to side. The car would sway a bit. You don't necessarily have to run it at the max PSI, but if you have a car that comes with a max pressure of 32/30 (front/rear) and buy a tire rated at 45 rather than the stock 35, you should be running at something more like 42/40.[/quote] You still shouldn't be running at sidewall pressure. That's the number above which the tire is structurally unstable and likely to explode.
I've never bought new tires, then again I've been around tires since I was 13 so I know what to look for. When I started working for my dad back in the day that was my job -- inspecting used tires for defects. There are always tell-tale signs of imminent failure. The closest thing I had to new tires was when I would buy 13"x8" racing tires off of the old track (pull offs, they race once with these tires and then throw them away) for $10 each. I ran those on a lot of stuff.
[QUOTE=TestECull;34755818]LOL used tires. I couldn't trust them. Maybe it's because of what I'm driving, but I'd rather buy a new tire than cheap out on a used one that could have a broken cord that lets go in a turn and sends me barrel rolling into an orphanage. In all seriousness, no used tires on my truck. If I get a flat I get two sticker tires, and the one I was running becomes the spare. It may cost more, but I can trust a brand new tire far more than I can trust a used one. You still shouldn't be running at sidewall pressure. That's the number above which the tire is structurally unstable and likely to explode.[/QUOTE] We used to always buy brand new tires and spend tons of money, but lately we've been buying used tires. My dad's truck requires heavy duty tires (I can't remember the rating. His pickup alone is ~8000 lbs, regularly hauls a tandem dump trailer and bobcat excavator) and it was something like $800 for a good set. Now he buys used and it's more like $80 a tire if I remember right. He buys several sets a year (drives a lot) and it ends up saving tons of money. Like bradley says, as long as you know what to look for, used tires are fine
I've used used tires before. Firstly, in my area, they're not that cheap. Used tires in my size, 235/75R15, run about $50-$80 a piece. A brand new Goodyear Wrangler identical to the ones I run normally is $79 mounted and balanced at Walmart. It makes no sense for me to get a used tire with next to no tread left when the price is so close to a new one. I might be persuaded to use used tires on a farmyard beater that never sees public roads, but anything I drive on the highway is going to be running sticker tires if I have to buy tires for it. I might be more inclined to do so if they were as cheap as yours are, but even then I wouldn't be able to trust them.
[QUOTE=TestECull;34764257]I've used used tires before. Firstly, in my area, they're not that cheap. Used tires in my size, 235/75R15, run about $50-$80 a piece. A brand new Goodyear Wrangler identical to the ones I run normally is $79 mounted and balanced at Walmart. It makes no sense for me to get a used tire with next to no tread left when the price is so close to a new one. I might be persuaded to use used tires on a farmyard beater that never sees public roads, but anything I drive on the highway is going to be running sticker tires if I have to buy tires for it. I might be more inclined to do so if they were as cheap as yours are, but even then I wouldn't be able to trust them.[/QUOTE] The used tires we buy usually have good tread. Like I said, since we got down here, only my dad has had to buy used tires. My car will need some soon. You can usually find tires with near new tread for $40 or so. Some shops advertise $20 for the smallest usual size (I can't remember what it is, something like 185/60/14. Is that a common size for any car?) I live in North Carolina at the moment. The guy my dad buys tires off says that he gets the tires from Virginia in big semi loads. He said there's some law about selling used tires there, so they bring them down here by the truck load and sell them cheap
We've never charged over $40 for a used tire, except for a set of 20s that were near brand new. Sold those for $200 as a set. Note that all of our prices included mounting and balancing, that was no extra. If you're paying $50-$80 for [i]"near bald"[/i] 15s of any size you're getting fucked. In fact, you had best be getting mint as fuck tires for that price.
Looks like standard radial bulge to me. Perfectly normal to see on a front engined car.
Might be some laws and/or taxes bumping the prices up here. The only used tires I can find that are financially worth it have a few thousand miles left in them before they turn into slicks. [QUOTE=bradley;34766058]We've never charged over $40 for a used tire, except for a set of 20s that were near brand new. Sold those for $200 as a set. Note that all of our prices included mounting and balancing, that was no extra. If you're paying $50-$80 for [i]"near bald"[/i] 15s of any size you're getting fucked. In fact, you had best be getting mint as fuck tires for that price.[/QUOTE] That's why I don't buy used tires. I can get brand new Goodyears for 79 a piece mounted and balanced, it makes no sense to go buy near-slicks for only 15-30 less.
[QUOTE=TestECull;34770503]it makes no sense to go buy near-slicks for only 15-30 less.[/QUOTE] If tires are that bad, they get thrown out. All the places I've seen around where I live won't resell a tire if it has less than 50% tread. Usually the ones I see have 75%+ tread on them
the pressure that's written on the tire isn't the pressure it should be at, it's the max pressure that it should be at for not losing any grip or to not deform it..the pressure depends from what car the tires are on, and how much weight you are carrying. There should be a sticker inside the door or somewhere else that gives the pressure the tires should be in different circumstances, like carrying passengers and luggage, by example.
[QUOTE=FordLord;34776418]If tires are that bad, they get thrown out. All the places I've seen around where I live won't resell a tire if it has less than 50% tread. Usually the ones I see have 75%+ tread on them[/QUOTE] That's how it is here. I don't run those places. The two used Michelins I bought had about 7500 miles or so left in 'em. They were originally 75,000 mile tires. Never again. New tires are too cheap to waste my money on used ones.
yes idiots, rate me dumb. I get surprised at how little people know in an 'automitive addicts' section.
Do you have any facts to back it up?
[QUOTE=Second-gear-of-mgear;34791368]Do you have any facts to back it up?[/QUOTE] We're on Facepunch :v:
bought used tires once - Worst idea ever. Always buy name-brand, new tires.
[QUOTE=areolop;34791473]bought used tires once - Worst idea ever. Always buy name-brand, new tires.[/QUOTE] Bought by company or just some person? I've bought used from a company and they were controlled and guaranteed safe ect. So I have no problems with that
[QUOTE=Second-gear-of-mgear;34791368]Do you have any facts to back it up?[/QUOTE] what do you mean with facts? I thought everybody in here would know the max pressure allowed on a tire isn't the pressure you should drive it at. By example, today i had an audi A4 break, with tires that could get max psi of 51. The pressure that was prescribed at MAX weight (4 passengers and luggage in the back) was 46 psi. Thats still 5psi under the max. In normal conditions the tires needed to be at 38 psi, that's when driving without any luggage and 2-3 passengers. Don't forget that when you drive a car, the tires heat up and pressure gets bigger.
[QUOTE=Droelsj;34791583]what do you mean with facts? I thought everybody in here would know the max pressure allowed on a tire isn't the pressure you should drive it at. By example, today i had an audi A4 break, with tires that could get max psi of 51. The pressure that was prescribed at MAX weight (4 passengers and luggage in the back) was 46 psi. Thats still 5psi under the max. In normal conditions the tires needed to be at 38 psi, that's when driving without any luggage and 2-3 passengers. Don't forget that when you drive a car, the tires heat up and pressure gets bigger.[/QUOTE] No one said to drive it at the max rated pressure. You should generally drive it with a few psi below that. If you really want to get into it, the best way to find the proper pressure would be to put your usual load inside the car and have it weighed on all four corners. You would then do the calculations to figure out how much PSI the tires will need (based on the sidewall max pressure load rating) to support the weight on each corner. Actually, when I do it that way, it comes out to 28psi per tire (average, based on my cars known weight with me and a friend in it) when using my KR21's. EDIT; Here's a site I found on the topic of tire inflations; [url]http://www.milesgallon.com/tire_pressure_calculator.php[/url] According to that, I should be running 32psi in my front and 40psi in my rear
At page 1 i've seen comments about putting them at pressure on the tire. Anyways, it was mainly about the dumbs, while what i'm saying is true.
NEOP WRONG
All I know is that fixaflat worked my my Camry snotmobile (hell, the tire even stayed inflated after I crashed the thing).
[QUOTE=lemon_lover;34565706]...it says on the tire what to set it at..[/QUOTE] usually the reading on the tire is the maximum pressure [editline]22nd February 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=Adamhully;34609752]Actually i wouldn't go by this. The one printed on the tire usually states what the MAX pressure is. You can find the correct pressures in your vehicles manual/handbook.[/QUOTE] oh i'm late
[QUOTE=Droelsj;34791583]what do you mean with facts? I thought everybody in here would know the max pressure allowed on a tire isn't the pressure you should drive it at. By example, today i had an audi A4 break, with tires that could get max psi of 51. The pressure that was prescribed at MAX weight (4 passengers and luggage in the back) was 46 psi. Thats still 5psi under the max. In normal conditions the tires needed to be at 38 psi, that's when driving without any luggage and 2-3 passengers. Don't forget that when you drive a car, the tires heat up and pressure gets bigger.[/QUOTE] The number on the side of a tire here in America is the absolute maximum it is structurally sound at, and is only put there to tell the guys mounting them the limit they can use to seat the bead. By telling us to inflate them to that number you're telling us to put our tires in a position that's dangerous and discouraged by everyone in the service industry over here, and that's why you're getting dumbspammed and disagreed with left right and center.
[QUOTE=TestECull;34815661]only put there to tell the guys mounting them the limit they can use to seat the bead. [/QUOTE] I have to disagree here. I've looked at a few different sites and they say that 40psi is the max you should use for seating a bead. They recommend going up to the max psi on the sidewall, but say that you can go up to 40psi. Sources; [url]http://www.yokohamatire.com/tires_101/tire_care_and_safety/match_mounting/[/url] [url]http://www.centraltireva.com/safetyinfo.php[/url] [url]http://www.carlisletire.com/product_care/trailer_tire_service_guide.pdf[/url] [url]http://www.barrystiretech.com/165tires.html[/url] [url]http://www.tiredefects.com/mounting-and-demounting-truck-tires.cfm[/url] [url]http://www.goodyear.com/cfmx/web/gov/police/tire_inflation.cfm[/url] Considering these sources are for many different tire types (Regular tires, performance tires, 16.5" tires (used on certain pickups,) truck tires, trailer tires, as well as one from some police thing, it's fairly safe to say that even though a tires says 35psi max, you can go up to 40psi during mounting.
[QUOTE=FordLord;34815741]I have to disagree here. I've looked at a few different sites and they say that 40psi is the max you should use for seating a bead. They recommend going up to the max psi on the sidewall, but say that you can go up to 40psi. Sources; [url]http://www.yokohamatire.com/tires_101/tire_care_and_safety/match_mounting/[/url] [url]http://www.centraltireva.com/safetyinfo.php[/url] [url]http://www.carlisletire.com/product_care/trailer_tire_service_guide.pdf[/url] [url]http://www.barrystiretech.com/165tires.html[/url] [url]http://www.tiredefects.com/mounting-and-demounting-truck-tires.cfm[/url] [url]http://www.goodyear.com/cfmx/web/gov/police/tire_inflation.cfm[/url] Considering these sources are for many different tire types (Regular tires, performance tires, 16.5" tires (used on certain pickups,) truck tires, trailer tires, as well as one from some police thing, it's fairly safe to say that even though a tires says 35psi max, you can go up to 40psi during mounting.[/QUOTE] Lowest I've ever seen on a tire intended for street use was 45PSI, and that's on my nylon belted radials.
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