• Multiple phones linked to CREATE a single hotspot?
    20 replies, posted
May sound weird but is it possible? I swear of heard something like it, but was it ever done? I was wondering if you could take a few verizon phones and make 1 single hotspot that my tablet could run off of to stream HD netflix (since you'd have 3 times the 3g working). Is this possible at all?
What, like, a distributed network? My words, not a technical one. Sounds like an intriguing concept but somehow I don't think it's possible. I may be horribly wrong, though. To get one phone to send a part of the data and the other to send another...that'd be interesting.
The problem is like having multiple brains, you have to coordinate multiple network connections so they don't overlap in what they download in order to be faster. With LTE this is all pointless anyhow.
As long as they all have the same SSID, I thought they would overlap?
No. Three women can't have one baby in 3 months.
[QUOTE=PvtCupcakes;32214024]No. Three women can't have one baby in 3 months.[/QUOTE] Pretty much this.
[QUOTE=PvtCupcakes;32214024]No. Three women can't have one baby in 3 months.[/QUOTE] Biology =/= Technology
[QUOTE=PvtCupcakes;32214024]No. Three women can't have one baby in 3 months.[/QUOTE] [img]http://img99.imageshack.us/img99/3936/genius.gif[/img] Yet irrelevant
well, technically it would be possible to split a network packet into three smaller packets, send them simultaniously on three connections, and the server reassembling the packet and using it. it's just that this is just a concept, and can't be used for the internet right now because servers don't have the software to reassemble a disassembled packet, and there isn't any software to split a packet into three smaller ones to send over different connections either if I'm correct.
Course it's possible, my dad's work uses it, they split connections between 2 Fiber lines and a backup Microwave Dish. It's possible yes, with expensive technology, with two phones talking to each other over an Ad-Hoc network, you probably wont get the best result and probably wouldn't be worth the trouble.
So you want a load-balance feature between many phones? Not sure if you can.
I've always wanted to do this, but with wireless instead it doesn't sound all impossible. it sounds like working with multiple threads on a CPU
[QUOTE=Keegs;32246156]Course it's possible, my dad's work uses it, they split connections between 2 Fiber lines and a backup Microwave Dish. It's possible yes, with expensive technology, with two phones talking to each other over an Ad-Hoc network, you probably wont get the best result and probably wouldn't be worth the trouble.[/QUOTE] I'm pretty sure the 2 fiber lines are split like, half the building is on one line, and the other half is on the other. Not like both lines go straight into your dad's workstation at the same time.
The network could work, but you could only use one Internet connection from one of the phones, rendering the whole thing useless (for what you are trying to accomplish anyway).
There exists a device that allows you to do this: [url]http://www.mushroomnetworks.com/products.aspx?product_id=1003[/url] I've seen it used for doing live video streaming and it seems to work. I would have no idea if you could replicate this with a standard computer.
[QUOTE=PvtCupcakes;32349285]I'm pretty sure the 2 fiber lines are split like, half the building is on one line, and the other half is on the other. Not like both lines go straight into your dad's workstation at the same time.[/QUOTE] No they're load balanced, it'll use whichever line is less busy.
Are you saying that the three phones combine to triple the bandwidth? I don't think that's possible. You would have three concurrent connections to whatever website you were connected to and would have to send three concurrent requests and it would end up being the same speed, if not slower due to the overhead. [editline]21st September 2011[/editline] [QUOTE=Keegs;32403893]No they're load balanced, it'll use whichever line is less busy.[/QUOTE] One fiber line is used for upload, and the other is used for download. If you tried to send light in both directions on one line simultaneously no data would get through. Fiber lines go in one direction.
This is like advanced tethering, and advanced TCP/IP. Advanced tethering becasue it's not one device made into a router, rather several devices to operate as one single router. For advanced TCP/IP, this concept requires the ability to send packets of data properly through the network on the phones, and re_construct the data the same way. I think a better option would be tether two devices which sends all of the data in and out from the internet onto one phone which is the actual tethered router. That would work better than three acting as a router together, which is less complicated thatn the concept in the op., most likely more efficient, faster. I don't think you can tether WiFi, as in within the concept and practice of turning your phone into a Wi-Fi repeater kind of thing. This would prevent overlapping ssids, confusing with the TCP/IP system. Of course, this may take years to actually happen. I'll keep this in mind, if I have some spare time I'll show some coder friends to make this work, in an app of course which might even be a new type of TCP/IP. This is an interesting concept but I don't think it would be really that useful in the future. I mean, how many people tether their smartphone as Wi-Fi? Only about one in two-hundred of my friends, coders actually bother tethering their internet, especially when they have unlimited bandwidth. I jsu don't think this would be a used feature since most don't tether right now. Of course, that could change. You should post this concept elsewhere, like in programming forums and internet dev forums, they can maybe help you.
The PortaBella (See the link I posted above) does something similar to what bootv2 was suggesting. It splits up the traffic between the wireless modems and uses some sort of proxy on the other end to reassemble the traffic. It's probably going to have a higher latency, though for things like video streaming or other things that don't need low latency, it should work just fine.
[QUOTE=benjgvps;32460777]The PortaBella (See the link I posted above) does something similar to what bootv2 was suggesting. It splits up the traffic between the wireless modems and uses some sort of proxy on the other end to reassemble the traffic. It's probably going to have a higher latency, though for things like video streaming or other things that don't need low latency, it should work just fine.[/QUOTE] I'd like to see that work out with a video demo, haven't found one on YouTube yet
[QUOTE=.PSID;32226823]Biology =/= Technology[/QUOTE] Read this book: [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Mythical_Man-Month[/url]
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