• General Linux Chat and Small Questions v. Install Arch
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Just changed to Arch Linux, and really liking it again. I've gone away from using the Gentoo-based system Sabayon, which I had used on my USB to conserve space while still remaining flexible enough for me. That doesn't really matter to me now that I'm having 60G on my fiances laptop! Huzzarh! Also using Compiz standalone rocks.
oh god, Ubuntu 12.10's name will be Quantal Quetzal. They just went plain-out silly with this one.
Okay so since the release of Ubuntu 12.10 is first on October 18, i installed Ubuntu 11.10 just to get into it again. Now a little problem, sometimes my mouse freezes on startup? And then i need to hold my power button down and restart my PC. Any fix? Oh and any good Ubuntu themes? Right now i only have Ambiance and Radiance. I don't dig them.
[QUOTE=Moofy;35695382]Okay so since the release of Ubuntu 12.10 is first on October 18, i installed Ubuntu 11.10 just to get into it again. Now a little problem, sometimes my mouse freezes on startup? And then i need to hold my power button down and restart my PC. Any fix? Oh and any good Ubuntu themes? Right now i only have Ambiance and Radiance. I don't dig them.[/QUOTE] lol ubuntu themes they're called Gtk themes or Gnome themes
[QUOTE=Moofy;35695382]Okay so since the release of Ubuntu 12.10 is first on October 18, i installed Ubuntu 11.10 just to get into it again. Now a little problem, sometimes my mouse freezes on startup? And then i need to hold my power button down and restart my PC. Any fix? Oh and any good Ubuntu themes? Right now i only have Ambiance and Radiance. I don't dig them.[/QUOTE] Just look on gnome-look.org, you're sure to find anything you'd like in the way of themes..
[QUOTE=q0q;35695526]lol ubuntu themes they're called Gtk themes or Gnome themes[/QUOTE] Sorry. [editline]edited[/editline] Alright then on to a more ADVANCED question then which i have completely no idea on how to fix! Taken from other thread: [QUOTE=kaukassus;35300742]if you want archey for debian based systems (ubuntu, mint, debian) then you can use this to download it and install it: [code] wget https://github.com/downloads/djmelik/archey/archey-0.2.8.deb sudo dpkg -i archey-0.2.8.deb [/code] if you install it on arch linux, you need to take it from the AUR Here's the link: [url]http://aur.archlinux.org/packages.php?ID=40420[/url] and here is a small tutorial, on how to install packages from the AUR: [URL="http://linuxandfriends.com/2009/09/30/arch-linux-how-to-install-packages-from-aur/"]LINK[/URL] when you have archey installed, you can execute it in terminal by typing in "archey" if you want to display the archey informations, when you open up the terminal, you need to edit the ~/.bashrc file. if the .bashrc file doesen't exist in your home directory, then you need to create it first. Then you need to adit the file, and add the entry "archey" somewhere into the file.[/QUOTE] Okay so i installed as told, and i know where the CONFIG file is. under: /usr/bin/archey, problem is when in terminal i type: "archey" it says permission denied. Using: Ubuntu 11.10 - Fresh installed from like 20 minutes ago. Oh and while on it. I managed to install it before, i just didn't knew how to change the logo thingy, and is it a possible to make the "[b]archey[/b]" command execute itself on terminal start?
[QUOTE=Moofy;35695588]Sorry. [editline]edited[/editline] Alright then on to a more ADVANCED question then which i have completely no idea on how to fix! Taken from other thread: Okay so i installed as told, and i know where the CONFIG file is. under: /usr/bin/archey, problem is when in terminal i type: "archey" it says permission denied. Using: Ubuntu 11.10 - Fresh installed from like 20 minutes ago. Oh and while on it. I managed to install it before, i just didn't knew how to change the logo thingy, and is it a possible to make the "[b]archey[/b]" command execute itself on terminal start?[/QUOTE] Try running chmod +x /usr/bin/archey as root (or sudo) Also, it says how to run it on terminal start in that post..Add it to the end of your ~/.bashrc. Generally just adding archey & will work, I think.
[QUOTE=Lyoko774;35695678]Try running chmod +x /usr/bin/archey as root (or sudo) Also, it says how to run it on terminal start in that post..Add it to the end of your ~/.bashrc. Generally just adding archey & will work, I think.[/QUOTE] Okay so i did what you said and it wouldn't work. However i did: [code]sudo -i apt-get install -f[/code] because my update manager was broken. Now everything works, oh jesus yes! But how do i set archey to launch at star? I know the ~/.bashrc. file, but where is it located? I tried looking through my file system. /usr/bin/?? and everywhere else. I know in the post it says in my home. But does it meen my home folder where i have my documents or what? [editline]edited[/editline] Okay so i found the file [b]bash.bashrc[/b] under /etc/.. i open it and save it the same place after i add the word "archey" to it? I just added it at the bottom of the file. But if i am doing this right, then it says i dont have permission to do this.
[QUOTE=Moofy;35695902]Okay so i did what you said and it wouldn't work. However i did: [code]sudo -i apt-get install -f[/code] because my update manager was broken. Now everything works, oh jesus yes! But how do i set archey to launch at star? I know the ~/.bashrc. file, but where is it located? I tried looking through my file system. /usr/bin/?? and everywhere else. I know in the post it says in my home. But does it meen my home folder where i have my documents or what? [editline]edited[/editline] Okay so i found the file [b]bash.bashrc[/b] under /etc/.. i open it and save it the same place after i add the word "archey" to it? I just added it at the bottom of the file. But if i am doing this right, then it says i dont have permission to do this.[/QUOTE] What the fuck? The ~ is the symbol for your home folder. The dot at the beginning of the file name means the file is hidden. Press ctrl+h to toggle showing hidden files, then edit the file. And your home folder is the directory containing your documents folder, as well as picture and music folder.
[QUOTE=T3hGamerDK;35696030]What the fuck? The ~ is the symbol for your home folder. The dot at the beginning of the file name means the file is hidden. Press ctrl+h to toggle showing hidden files, then edit the file. And your home folder is the directory containing your documents folder, as well as picture and music folder.[/QUOTE] Aaaah. I learned something today. Thanks a lot.
Finally got Debian up and running on my thin client. Ideally I should have used something like SliTaz but I couldn't make it boot from USB. Does anyone have any ideas on how to slim Debian down? At the moment my setup is running at 104 MB out of 109 MB memory so it is practically running everything from swap. [editline]25th April 2012[/editline] Wow. Just shaved off 50 MB by killing dhclient and setting up static IP. How the fuck? Never mind, it was just because I rebooted.
[QUOTE=Lyoko774;35684830]GNOME 3.4 is finally in [community], huzzah! (and also GTK3 3.4) not that I use it.[/QUOTE] And I am so glad Centos is still on Gnome 2, Gnome 3 is an abomination
[QUOTE=Tucan Sam;35714987]And I am so glad Centos is still on Gnome 2, Gnome 3 is an abomination[/QUOTE] I don't see what the hate is about with GNOME 3...It's different, sure, but I think it's becoming for the better.
[QUOTE=Lyoko774;35715623]I don't see what the hate is about with GNOME 3...It's different, sure, but I think it's becoming for the better.[/QUOTE] If Gnome 3 is for the better, then I definitely don't wanna see what they mean is for the worse. Are they trying to make KDE look great in comparison?
Okay so i have this dude in my class yelling at me why i use GNOME 3 and Ubuntu, saying i should downgrade and set everything up myself. Now, he says i should do Gentoo, Debian and what not. Alright, so can someone tell me why everyone hates new things? And why everyone want's to do everything by by hand. Tell me, should i start learn getting the "hard" stuff, it's no secret i have no idea how thing work here. Where did you guys learn all about Linux? Because i feel like.. I use this. Done.
[QUOTE=Moofy;35715844]Okay so i have this dude in my class yelling at me why i use GNOME 3 and Ubuntu, saying i should downgrade and set everything up myself. Now, he says i should do Gentoo, Debian and what not. Alright, so can someone tell me why everyone hates new things? And why everyone want's to do everything by by hand. Tell me, should i start learn getting the "hard" stuff, it's no secret i have no idea how thing work here. Where did you guys learn all about Linux? Because i feel like.. I use this. Done.[/QUOTE] It's generally not a bad idea to try something like Gentoo or Arch Linux though. You really do learn a lot about Linux in general.
[QUOTE=horsedrowner;35715907]It's generally not a bad idea to try something like Gentoo or Arch Linux though. You really do learn a lot about Linux in general.[/QUOTE] Yea i want to learn, problem is i don't know where to get some information. Generally i wan't to install Gentoo, but im the type of guy who really cares about the looks. I wan't Arch, i just think that i have [b]NO[/b] idea when you get to the [b]pacman[/b] part an on.
[QUOTE=Moofy;35716004] im the type of guy who really cares about the looks. [/QUOTE] this makes me question your linuxability. also, gnome 3 takes away user independence, that's why it blows.
[QUOTE=Moofy;35716004]Yea i want to learn, problem is i don't know where to get some information. Generally i wan't to install Gentoo, but im the type of guy who really cares about the looks. I wan't Arch, i just think that i have [b]NO[/b] idea when you get to the [b]pacman[/b] part an on.[/QUOTE] The ArchWiki is really good, for beginners and experienced people alike, at least in my opinion. Try [url]https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Beginners%27_Guide[/url] for example. Installing Arch is reasonably easy; you have an interactive installer which guides you through the most important parts, unlike Gentoo (if I recall correctly). And even if you don't succeed at first, you still learn a lot about the process. [editline].[/editline] I won't be of help when it comes to looks, though. I've always found Linux lacking in that area. Don't get me wrong, I've seen great looking desktops, but I can never seem to find good themes, and gnome-look is a pain to browse through, in my opinion.
[QUOTE=horsedrowner;35716050]The ArchWiki is really good, for beginners and experienced people alike, at least in my opinion. Try [url]https://wiki.archlinux.org/index.php/Beginners%27_Guide[/url] for example. Installing Arch is reasonably easy; you have an interactive installer which guides you through the most important parts, unlike Gentoo (if I recall correctly). And even if you don't succeed at first, you still learn a lot about the process.[/QUOTE] You seem like a guy who knows a bunch. Do you know how long the process will take for a newbie? Oh and, will i at any point need a wired connection for setting up wireless in Arch? I hear i don't but people i know IRL say's i need. Should i believe Facepunch or my friends from kindergarden? Oh fuck them, go Facepunch!
[QUOTE=Moofy;35716072]You seem like a guy who knows a bunch. Do you know how long the process will take for a newbie? Oh and, will i at any point need a wired connection for setting up wireless in Arch? I hear i don't but people i know IRL say's i need. Should i believe Facepunch or my friends from kindergarden? Oh fuck them, go Facepunch![/QUOTE] The Beginner's Guide should guide you through the process. Ideally you'd have a second PC or laptop that you can use to read the guide while you're installing. It's pretty detailed and explaining. You don't need a wired connection to set up wireless. I believe both the core and netinstall images come with wireless tools. Again, the beginner's guide explains this is more detail than I can.
[QUOTE=horsedrowner;35716101]The Beginner's Guide should guide you through the process. Ideally you'd have a second PC or laptop that you can use to read the guide while you're installing. It's pretty detailed and explaining. You don't need a wired connection to set up wireless. I believe both the core and netinstall images come with wireless tools. Again, the beginner's guide explains this is more detail than I can.[/QUOTE] I do have a second PC. But do you recommend Arch right away? Should i try Debian first or something else?
[QUOTE=Moofy;35716163]I do have a second PC. But do you recommend Arch right away? Should i try Debian first or something else?[/QUOTE] Jesus, try it out in a virtualized environment first. Virtualbox or something like that. Not to mention Virtualbox supports taking "snapshots" of the VM, so you can easily revert back to a previous state.
[QUOTE=Moofy;35716163]I do have a second PC. But do you recommend Arch right away? Should i try Debian first or something else?[/QUOTE] If you're able to, it would probably be wise to install it in a Virtual Machine first. You wouldn't have to give it a lot of memory nor disk space, especially if you're doing a basic install to get the right idea.
And so for desktop enviorment i should choose.. GNOME 2? If im correct?
[QUOTE=Moofy;35716780]And so for desktop enviorment i should choose.. GNOME 2? If im correct?[/QUOTE] Xfce is my personal favourite, it is very lightweight yet very customizable. Gnome 2 (MATE as it is known now) is alright but a bit bloaty, Lxde is incredibly lightweight but lacks the features of most full desktop enviroments, and KDE has a ton of eye candy but also is the most heavyweight of all. Razor QT is really nice as well, it ranks close to Xfce in terms of lightweight, but is still lacking a bit on features due to it being somewhat new. [editline]26th April 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=q0q;35716820]Xfce is my personal favourite, it is very lightweight yet very customizable. Gnome 2 (MATE as it is known now) is alright but a bit bloaty, Lxde is incredibly lightweight but lacks the features of most full desktop enviroments, and KDE has a ton of eye candy but also is the most heavyweight of all. Razor QT is really nice as well, it ranks close to Xfce in terms of lightweight, but is still lacking a bit on features due to it being somewhat new.[/QUOTE] In terms of my personal Arch install, I use Openbox standalone.
[QUOTE=Moofy;35716780]And so for desktop enviorment i should choose.. GNOME 2? If im correct?[/QUOTE] It really comes down to personal preference. I suggest you just try a few different to see which you prefer.
[QUOTE=q0q;35716820]Xfce is my personal favourite, it is very lightweight yet very customizable. Gnome 2 (MATE as it is known now) is alright but a bit bloaty, Lxde is incredibly lightweight but lacks the features of most full desktop enviroments, and KDE has a ton of eye candy but also is the most heavyweight of all. Razor QT is really nice as well, it ranks close to Xfce in terms of lightweight, but is still lacking a bit on features due to it being somewhat new. [editline]26th April 2012[/editline] In terms of my personal Arch install, I use Openbox standalone.[/QUOTE] Ive looked on it. It feels like it is a bit, too lightweight? How customizible is it? Normally i would say KDE, but after my experience with it on Linux Mint i will never touch it again. [editline]editline[/editline] [QUOTE=horsedrowner;35716869]It really comes down to personal preference. I suggest you just try a few different to see which you prefer.[/QUOTE] Ya', but what i meen is that i have no idea really on how Linux "works". I feel like i just Google stuff i heard about that i wan't, find terminal command and get it done. There is no, me in it. I just find the information and thats all. I really don't learn anything.
Xfce is extremely customizable and lightweight, in my opinion if you're going to go for a full desktop environment you might as well go with Xfce. Here's some examples from the Arch forum of what you can make Xfce look like with some tlc. [url]https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=84840&p=12[/url]
[QUOTE=q0q;35717030]Xfce is extremely customizable and lightweight, in my opinion if you're going to go for a full desktop environment you might as well go with Xfce. Here's some examples from the Arch forum of what you can make Xfce look like with some tlc. [url]https://bbs.archlinux.org/viewtopic.php?id=84840&p=12[/url][/QUOTE] Wow, first i thought you were a douche. You seem like a cool guy, well when you don't call newbies dumbasses. Thanks for your support! [editline]editline[/editline] EMERGENCY! So i installed Xubuntu on my moms netbook. Everything works but get this: "JAVA wont run in firefox, which makes it crash". She needs java to go into her Bank account online. Now i wen't to Ubuntu Software Center - and downloaded java, it would still not work. After some time it did work when i installed the "restricted areas" for Xubuntu. Found it on "LinuxQuestions" forum. Now it ran, but Firefox crashes when it launches the java applet. I uninstalled Java completely, now it just says that java is not installed. If any help, can you please just give me the terminal codes? I find them better than software center. ALSO! I did: [code]sudo apt-get update[/code] [code]sudo apt-get install sun-java6-jre sun-java6-plugin sun-java6-fonts[/code] It just tells me that the packages does not exists? Need help badly, also soon as possible! And the extras i talked about: [code]sudo apt-get install xubuntu-restricted-extras[/code]
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