• Reapplied thermal paste - PC now won't power on for more than a second
    26 replies, posted
I pulled out a couple of cables that went from the PSU to the mobo, then put them back in, and I had some trouble reattaching the fan/heatsink to the mobo. What's the most likely problem? Also I jiggled the cables around a bit and it stayed powered on, but wouldn't display anything onscreen.
Check all the cables are in fully and any jumpers that should be there have not been dislodged.
Thermal paste has nothing to do with the powering on of you machine, and theres no way in hell your processor is overheating in less than a second
If your mobo beeped in an unusual way (instead of the normal short single beep with most mobos), check the manual's troubleshooting section too.
If the thermal paste contains silver or another conductive element, you could have possibly caused your CPU to short by dripping some into the socket (god knows how) or near the socket (more likely). Make sure there is none around the CPU (other than on top of it). I've heard of manufacturers removing warranties because of paste with silver for this exact reason.
All the cables I unplugged are back in (I think) and now it's powering on reliably, but for some reason my monitor won't display anything, and my mouse light is off (but my USB fan works if I plug it into the same port). What have I done?
Not sure what type of computer you have... Does your machine have any sort of Diagnostic Lights? (These are standard on most modern Dell machines) Here's the process of what I do here at the office when that happens: Take out all the ram. Turn on your machine. You should hear a solid monotonous beeping. If so, good. Turn off you computer, put your RAM back in. Try turning on your machine again. If it boots, well done. If it does not boot, try and find another PSU to test it with. Usually any failure on the PSU will result in a solid Amber light, instead of a Green one. (Again, this is also Company specific to Dell, but most usually have a little LED directly on the motherboard for this purpose.) If you do find an amber light, this means 1 of 2 things: A:) You fried your motherboard due to a blow capacitor, or B:) Your PSU is malfunctioning and needs to be replaced. If you have both a Green light, and your RAM is fine, Unplug all your peripherals (Graphics cards, LAN cards, etc.) and try booting once more. If this fails, then more than likely your motherboard needs to be replaced. On a side note... You didn't happen to remove your CPU and place it in the wrong way now did you?
The only thing that could cause an immediate power cut would be... well... the source of the power. Sounds like your PSU is having issues.
[QUOTE=SeveredSkull;36751753]On a side note... You didn't happen to remove your CPU and place it in the wrong way now did you?[/QUOTE] ...if I had, would it be irreparably bollocksed up?
[QUOTE=Nigey Nige;36752016]...if I had, would it be irreparably bollocksed up?[/QUOTE] Pretty much. Got a spare CPU lying around? [editline]13th July 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=SeveredSkull;36752980]Pretty much[/QUOTE] You are lucky I have a shitton of desktops lying around here that I don't need (And are getting thrown away anyway)... I took out my CPU and turned it on. Similar issue to what you are having. Forced in my CPU in the wrong way (Which is pretty much impossible due to the slits on the sides...) CPU Sparked and now machine wont power up. So yeah... If you're computer is powering on... You didn't put it in backwards. Now I'm out a computer. Oh well.
[QUOTE=SeveredSkull;36752980]Pretty much. Got a spare CPU lying around? [editline]13th July 2012[/editline] You are lucky I have a shitton of desktops lying around here that I don't need (And are getting thrown away anyway)... I took out my CPU and turned it on. Similar issue to what you are having. Forced in my CPU in the wrong way (Which is pretty much impossible due to the slits on the sides...) CPU Sparked and now machine wont power up. So yeah... If you're computer is powering on... You didn't put it in backwards. Now I'm out a computer. Oh well.[/QUOTE] Thank fuck for that, but I'm so sorry for your loss. Viking burial?
It was goin' in the dumpster soon anyway...
I actually have a related issue after replacing thermal paste, checked all my cables, etc. after doing that it powered on once, and I left it running windows Update, came back and it was off and it hasn't wanted to start up since thinking it might be a bad connection since it powered on the one time, can't imagine a blown capacitor would just so happen to work for 20 minutes and then crap out again
any beeps?
[QUOTE=SeveredSkull;36741844]Thermal paste has nothing to do with the powering on of you machine, and theres no way in hell your processor is overheating in less than a second[/QUOTE] lies, When I first built my PC, I wasn't informed about the existance of thermal paste, and was like "wtf is this shit?" *Throws in trash Booted up my PC, see BIOS then SHOOOMMMM down it goes.
[QUOTE=lkymky;36814120]lies, When I first built my PC, I wasn't informed about the existance of thermal paste, and was like "wtf is this shit?" *Throws in trash Booted up my PC, see BIOS then SHOOOMMMM down it goes.[/QUOTE] Sounds more like something was wrong with the bios. Unless your tower case was the inside of an oven.
That's most likely because you are a retard and your CPU overheated due to it not being applied to your heatsink Totally different fucking story. Learn to read. We are referring to the paste touching the motherboard and its components. [editline]17th July 2012[/editline] bah. Ninja'd by Frank
Okay, I don't think it's the thermal paste. The comp is now powering on fine, but for some reason the monitor won't display anything. The connection between monitor and GPU seems fine, and I can't find any cables that aren't plugged in. What do?
[QUOTE=Nigey Nige;36885726]Okay, I don't think it's the thermal paste. The comp is now powering on fine, but for some reason the monitor won't display anything. The connection between monitor and GPU seems fine, and I can't find any cables that aren't plugged in. What do?[/QUOTE] Are you missing power cables on the side of your GPU? Check the seating on your RAM and GPU, take them out, dust the slots and put them back in.
[QUOTE=SeveredSkull;36741844]Thermal paste has nothing to do with the powering on of you machine, and theres no way in hell your processor is overheating in less than a second[/QUOTE] Incorrect. If the heatsink isn't mounted properly, the CPU can definitely overheat to thermal shutdown levels in less than a second. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8lS7KoOEeo&feature=related[/media] [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQG1Lr1DmZk[/media]
In BOTH of you videos the CPU was on for longer than a second. Your argument is invalid. The first video is under a relatively heavy (compared to startup) load and still survives on the low end/low power CPUs (Dual ~2 GHz). The second, I cant really judge due to the fact that I don't know the state of the computer, but it appears to In addition, there's no way the amount of stress on the CPU will be even significant enough while loading the BIOS. Once the OS is loaded THEN you would have a proper argument... but not simply upon turning it on. Sorry, I repair computers and I personally fuck with them when they are going to the dumpster/shredder. You are incorrect in MOST (but not all) areas. [editline]24th July 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=Nigey Nige;36885726]Okay, I don't think it's the thermal paste. The comp is now powering on fine, but for some reason the monitor won't display anything. The connection between monitor and GPU seems fine, and I can't find any cables that aren't plugged in. What do?[/QUOTE] 1 of 2 things: Ram or Bad Motherboard. Since I am assuming you checked the RAM, the motherboards gotta be broken in some sort of way. You never answered my question regarding the Diag lights - if you have any. A good idea would to post your MB Model so we can help you further.
[QUOTE=bohb;36911363] [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W8lS7KoOEeo&feature=related[/media] [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQG1Lr1DmZk[/media][/QUOTE] It saddens me to see processors used without thermal paste or a heatsink :(
Sorry, I was in Bristol this week so couldn't respond to this thread. [QUOTE=SeveredSkull;36751753]Not sure what type of computer you have... Does your machine have any sort of Diagnostic Lights? (These are standard on most modern Dell machines) Here's the process of what I do here at the office when that happens: Take out all the ram. Turn on your machine. You should hear a solid monotonous beeping. If so, good. Turn off you computer, put your RAM back in. Try turning on your machine again. If it boots, well done. If it does not boot, try and find another PSU to test it with. Usually any failure on the PSU will result in a solid Amber light, instead of a Green one. (Again, this is also Company specific to Dell, but most usually have a little LED directly on the motherboard for this purpose.) If you do find an amber light, this means 1 of 2 things: A:) You fried your motherboard due to a blow capacitor, or B:) Your PSU is malfunctioning and needs to be replaced. If you have both a Green light, and your RAM is fine, Unplug all your peripherals (Graphics cards, LAN cards, etc.) and try booting once more. If this fails, then more than likely your motherboard needs to be replaced. On a side note... You didn't happen to remove your CPU and place it in the wrong way now did you?[/QUOTE] I built my own PC, so no diagnostic lights unfortunately. I removed the RAM and turned it on, but heard no beeping. It didn't seem to make a difference. Is that bad? I can't actually tell whether it's booting or not. Everything [i]looks[/i] fine, but the monitor isn't displaying anything. I tried plugging the monitor into my laptop and it worked fine, though. The fan on the GPU is spinning, so I assume I plugged it in right. My motherboard doesn't seem to have any LEDs on it, and I've only got the one PSU. :( It's 570W, so I don't think it's a low-power issue (although it was quite cheap, bought from a little independent tech store). [QUOTE=SeveredSkull;36913528]1 of 2 things: Ram or Bad Motherboard. Since I am assuming you checked the RAM, the motherboards gotta be broken in some sort of way. You never answered my question regarding the Diag lights - if you have any. A good idea would to post your MB Model so we can help you further.[/QUOTE] My mobo model is ASRock G31M-VS. It also says FSB1333 on there, if that helps. Thanks for the help so far! [editline]1st August 2012[/editline] Okay, I tried plugging the monitor cable into what I think is the motherboard slot for onboard graphics(?) and got pretty much the same result. Does this mean I need a new motherboard? Any way of testing to find out whether it's buggered?
[QUOTE=SeveredSkull;36913528]In BOTH of you videos the CPU was on for longer than a second. Your argument is invalid. The first video is under a relatively heavy (compared to startup) load and still survives on the low end/low power CPUs (Dual ~2 GHz). The second, I cant really judge due to the fact that I don't know the state of the computer, but it appears to[/QUOTE] The CPU with Quake 3 running on it (Socket 423 Pentium 4) has thermal throttling mechanisms where it will slow the CPU down and insert tons of NOPs into the pipeline to reduce the heat output. AMD Athlons had no such luxury and just burned. And while modern CPUs have a much lower TDP, they also have a much smaller die area where heat is concentrated. It is very easy to get to 80+C in a second or less and have thermal shutdown. [QUOTE=SeveredSkull;36913528]In addition, there's no way the amount of stress on the CPU will be even significant enough while loading the BIOS. Once the OS is loaded THEN you would have a proper argument... but not simply upon turning it on. Sorry, I repair computers and I personally fuck with them when they are going to the dumpster/shredder. You are incorrect in MOST (but not all) areas.[/QUOTE] When the CPU is first powered on, it runs at full clock speed, max voltage and is running internal tests, which is basically equivalent to 100% CPU usage. It will stay at full throttle and max voltage until an ACPI aware OS tells the CPU to slow down. While in the pre-ACPI state, the CPU generates tons more heat from the maximum power consumption.
Can anyone help? Really want to use source filmmaker and my laptop has integrated graphics. :(
reset cmos.. my board has a button for it. Check the manual for it
[QUOTE=cNova;37065982]reset cmos.. my board has a button for it. Check the manual for it[/QUOTE] Done, no change. :(
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