• What Linux is good for you.
    97 replies, posted
So to all of you who are interested in trying Linux or are interested in trying a new kind of Linux, I've started this thread. Here I and others, will write about the pros and cons of different Linux distributions. The goal of this thread is that anyone, new comer or novice user, can find the flavor of Linux that fits themselves the most. Nearly all distros have a LiceCD or DVD. With it, you can just burn a disk and boot up Linux. When you take out the disk, your computer is the same (unless you edited something something on the drives!) Remember, all Linux distros can virtually do the same things: Printing, editing photos, make servers, compile kernels etc. But some are more focused on a specific subject, therefore the community will also be focused on that subject. Bionic Apple has also written [url=http://www.facepunch.com/showthread.php?t=756857]Beginner's Guide[/url], it goes through what Linux is, and in the end you install Ubuntu. [b][url=www.ubuntu.com]Ubuntu[/url][/b] Ubuntu is by far, the most popular Linux distro. Therefore it also got a big community that can help users. It's considered as one of the easiest Linux distros to use, at least for newcomers to Linux. Ubuntu is based on Debian, and can install Debian packages (apps etc.). New versions of Ubuntu are released twice a year, one in the spring and one in fall. [u]Pros[/u] * Easy to use and install. * Big community. * Many guides. * Debian apps can be installed on Ubuntu. [u]Cons[/u] * If you want to learn more about the inner works of Linux, Ubuntu is not the best choice. [b][url=www.LinuxMint.com]Linux Mint[/url][/b] Linux Mint is based on Ubuntu, and therefore it can use the same packages (apps etc.) as Ubuntu. Where Linux Mint differs is that it's build to run much better out of the box. Many additional wireless drivers, codecs and plug-ins are preinstalled. For example, Flash is already installed, so you can go browse YouTube without any installation. Mint is also shipped with some additional tools called Mint tools to make it easier to configure and use the system. [u]Pros[/u] * Easy to use and install. * Many preinstalled codecs and plug-ins. * Ubuntu guides can be used (to a certain extend) on Linux Mint. * Debian and Ubuntu apps can be installed on Linux Mint [u]Cons[/u] * If you want to learn more about the inner works of Linux, Linux Mint is not the best choice. * Since it includes some proprietary codecs and drivers, it's not completely Open-Source. [b][url=http://www2.mandriva.com/]Mandriva Linux[/url][/b] Mandriva Linux was originally released by MandrakeSoft as Mandrake Linux as an easy to use and powerful Linux distribution for both those new to Linux, and powerusers. When Mandrake was released in 1998, Linux was already well known for it's stability and power, but any use of it required such extensive technical knowledge that it had no hope of becoming a mainstream operating system. MandrakeSoft saw this as an opportunity to introduce a more user-friendly distribution than ever seen in the Linux community. Pros: * Extremely fast if your computer can handle KDE 4 or Gnome. * Somewhat light (Approximately 650 Mb. That's better than Red Hat. Even Red Hat 9 from 2003 took up four times as much space) * Very user friendly, while still being powerful * Ships with Gnome or KDE4. Works flawlessly with Enlightenment, XFCE, or Fluxbox (These are the only alternatives I've tried on Mandriva.) * Will boot on literally anything. I've run it in CLI on a computer with 512 K RAM and a pre-Pentium processor. * Has a free version that's as good as the enterprise version, but misses a few non-essential programs that nobody uses. * Uses RPMs, so pretty much any program will work on it. Cons: * Runs extremely slow if X is enabled on old hardware (I'm talking pre-2000 old. If you have this problem, you should be using Damn Small Linux or Puppy anyway) * Doesn't work too well with JWM, although not much does. * Default DE is KDE 4, this makes changing to a different DE or WM painful on first boot. I suggest using CLI to download another WM with urpmi before you do anything. Notes: * Slow package manager, but that's not a big issue. * Has an enterprise version. * Network install isn't an option. Thanks to ButtsexV2, for the section about Mandriva. [b][URL=http://www.archlinux.org/]Arch[/URL][/b] Arch is an advanced distribution, and is similar in ways to Gentoo. It also has to be installed and built up from command line. It is famous for it's efficient package manager: "Pacman". I installed this distribution because I was looking for a nice lightweight distribution that had customising capabilities and could look pleasing to the eyes. I was also looking for a way to become more familiar with a Linux system and be as close to the code as I could. Arch covered all of these perfectly for me, and more. That wasn't actually supposed to sound baised, but it turned out like it. Still, it's a fantastic distribution for someone who is looking for something more advanced and configurable. [U]Pros:[/U] Basically all of the same pros as Gentoo, it's also super fast if you want it to be. The documentation is also fantastic, it guides you through everything perfectly. * Doesn't come with a desktop environment/any GUI at all (See Cons). [U]Cons:[/U] * Relatively complicated unless you know what you are doing (Also a pro if you are looking to gain knowledge of Linux). * Pacman can sometimes not find the right dependancies, but this is fixable. It also may just be something to do with my mirror. * Doesn't come with a desktop environment/any GUI at all (See Pros). Thanks to nos217, for the section about Arch. [b][url=www.gentoo.org]Gentoo[/url][/b] Gentoo is one of the most configurable distros that exist. The installation of Gentoo is not graphical and it involves compiling you own kernel. But don't fear, Gentoo has a great and very complete guide that walks you through all of the steps and in the end, you might get a highly optimised system (graphics are optional). The nature of Gentoo is that all packages are compiled from source, and therefore you only install exactly what you need. You don't want network support? You think unicode is bloated? You think xterm is too slow? Gentoo is for you. [u]Pros[/u] * Highly configurable. * Can be extremely optimised. * Nothing is installed unless you say so. * Teaches you about how Linux is put together. * Very big repository of packages that is frequently updated (Several times a week) * Big community that can help you make the right choices. [u]Cons[/u] * Hard to install without knowing how to use the shell. * May seem like a configuration hell. * It takes time to master optimisation. * Gentoo is stable, but your likeliness to kill the system is higher. (Can be fixed in 99% of the cases) [i]Comming up: KDE vs. Gnome, Fedora and more![/i] Do you find something missing? A distro you want to write about? Is something outdated? PM me your changes or suggestions. Tasks I want help with: * Other kinds of Ubuntu * Damn Small Linux * Slackware * openSUSE
For me, Ubuntu is the best
[B]Linux Mint 7 [url]www.LinuxMint.com[/url][/B]
[b]Mandriva Linux[/b] Mandriva Linux was originally released by MandrakeSoft as Mandrake Linux as an easy to use and powerful Linux distribution for both those new to Linux, and powerusers. When Mandrake was released in 1998, Linux was already well known for it's stability and power, but any use of it required such extensive technical knowledge that it had no hope of becoming a mainstream operating system. MandrakeSoft saw this as an opportunity to introduce a more user-friendly distribution than ever seen in the Linux community. Pros: ►Extremely fast if your computer can handle KDE 4 or Gnome. ►Somewhat light (Approximately 650 Mb. That's better than Red Hat. Even Red Hat 9 from 2003 took up four times as much space) ►Very user friendly, while still being powerful ►Ships with Gnome or KDE4. Works flawlessly with Enlightenment, XFCE, or Fluxbox (These are the only alternatives I've tried on Mandriva.) ►Will boot on literally anything. I've run it in CLI on a computer with 512 K RAM and a pre-Pentium processor. ►Has a free version that's as good as the enterprise version, but misses a few non-essential programs that nobody uses. ►Uses RPMs, so pretty much any program will work on it. Cons: ►Runs extremely slow if X is enabled on old hardware (I'm talking pre-2000 old. If you have this problem, you should be using Damn Small Linux or Puppy anyway) ►Doesn't work too well with JWM, although not much does. ►Default DE is KDE 4, this makes changing to a different DE or WM painful on first boot. I suggest using CLI to download another WM with urpmi. ►Slow package manager, but that's not a big issue. More of a note than a con. ►Has an enterprise version. ►Network install isn't an option. Once again, more of a note than a con. Edit: Will write one on Fedora, and maybe one on Damn Small Linux. Edit again: [quote]There we go. That totals up to something like 300 words.[/quote] That line isn't meant to be included :v:
[QUOTE=ButtsexV2;15608145]That line isn't meant to be included :v:[/QUOTE] Fixed!
[QUOTE=Recording...;15607563][B]Linux Mint 7 [url]www.LinuxMint.com[/url][/B][/QUOTE] Ughh, would everyone stop posting that [B]everywhere.[/B] [editline]07:47PM[/editline] [b][URL=http://www.archlinux.org/]Arch[/URL][/b] Arch is an advanced distribution, and is similar in ways to Gentoo. It also has to be installed and built up from command line. It is famous for it's efficient package manager: "Pacman". I installed this distribution because I was looking for a nice lightweight distribution that had customising capabilities and could look pleasing to the eyes. I was also looking for a way to become more familiar with a Linux system and be as close to the code as I could. Arch covered all of these perfectly for me, and more. That wasn't actually supposed to sound baised, but it turned out like it. Still, it's a fantastic distribution for someone who is looking for something more advanced and configurable. [U]Pros:[/U] Basically all of the same pros as Gentoo, it's also super fast if you want it to be. The documentation is also fantastic, it guides you through everything perfectly. * Doesn't come with a desktop environment/any GUI at all (See Cons). [U]Cons:[/U] * Relatively complicated unless you know what you are doing (Also a pro if you are looking to gain knowledge of Linux). * Pacman can sometimes not find the right dependancies, but this is fixable. It also may just be something to do with my mirror. * Doesn't come with a desktop environment/any GUI at all (See Pros). Overall, a fantastic distribution. Definitely my favourite so far.
[quote] Ubuntu is by far, the most popular Linux distro [/quote] Fedora claims their community is larger. :v: According to Fedora's Stats they have 13,397,110 users. And Fedora 8 still has the most users. (more than 7, 9, 10, and 11) I'm too lazy to do a full Fedora thing, but here are some Pros and cons. Pros: Backed by Red Hat. Super up to date. (at least when it's released :3: ) Works the bugs out of unstable software which works its way down to other distros like Ubuntu. Cons: Really unstable (see super up to date)
I thought red hat was the most used??
[QUOTE=hrothunder;15617999]I thought red hat was the most used??[/QUOTE] On servers it is. And Fedora is officially sponsored by Red Hat, and a lot of Red Hat employees work on it. Like I said in the post above, Fedora [b]claims[/b] to have more users than Ubuntu. But they keep much better statistics so it's hard to tell.
[QUOTE=PvtCupcakes;15617948]Fedora claims their community is larger. :v: According to Fedora's Stats they have 13,397,110 users. And Fedora 8 still has the most users. (more than 7, 9, 10, and 11) I'm too lazy to do a full Fedora thing, but here are some Pros and cons. Pros: Backed by Red Hat. Super up to date. (at least when it's released :3: ) Works the bugs out of unstable software which works its way down to other distros like Ubuntu. Cons: Really unstable (see super up to date)[/QUOTE] Wow, I might just install that distro to see what its like. I love being all the way up to date in the new software. Ubuntu never managed to do that for me. Quick question, whats the difference between the DVD and CD Fedora.
[QUOTE=Prefan;15618837]Wow, I might just install that distro to see what its like. I love being all the way up to date in the new software. Ubuntu never managed to do that for me. Quick question, whats the difference between the DVD and CD Fedora.[/QUOTE] I don't think the DVD has a live environment. It just goes straight to the installer; you don't get the desktop to play with. And it has a lot more stuff on it.
[QUOTE=PvtCupcakes;15619474]I don't think the DVD has a live environment. It just goes straight to the installer; you don't get the desktop to play with. And it has a lot more stuff on it.[/QUOTE] This, it is all correct.
I never really used Fedora. I went from Ubuntu -> Mint -> Debian -> Arch. I deel like it would be a downgrade if I went to fedora because of the effort I put into my Arch system.
Has anyone tried [url=http://www.foresightlinux.org/]Foresight Linux[/url]? Looks like an interesting distribution.
[QUOTE=Bionic Apple;15630732]Has anyone tried [url=http://www.foresightlinux.org/]Foresight Linux[/url]? Looks like an interesting distribution.[/QUOTE] That does look pretty nice. I'm going to try it out tonight. Dling Foresight XFCE x64 dvd now.
[QUOTE=Bionic Apple;15630732]Has anyone tried [url=http://www.foresightlinux.org/]Foresight Linux[/url]? Looks like an interesting distribution.[/QUOTE] Thanks for this, DLing x64 now. [img]http://d2k5.com/sa_emots/smile.gif[/img]
Ubuntu ultimate edition [url]http://ultimateedition.info/[/url]
Suse is good but it's huge.
This should be Stickied
Thanks for the thanks :).
[QUOTE=MichaelFTW;15709450]Ubuntu ultimate edition [url]http://ultimateedition.info/[/url][/QUOTE] That website is ugly. I wouldn't want to get an OS that claims to be innovative and the 'ultimate' from a website that looks like something you'd see in the web archive.
What about Fedora.
[QUOTE=Traxxasred;15765028]What about Fedora.[/QUOTE] Write about it and I will include it.
[QUOTE=MichaelFTW;15709450]Ubuntu ultimate edition [url]http://ultimateedition.info/[/url][/QUOTE] Eww what the [B]hell?[/B]
I think I am going to give arch linux a shot. I heard you can customize almost everything to get a minimal install.
[QUOTE=User Name;15897323]I think I am going to give arch linux a shot. I heard you can customize almost everything to get a minimal install.[/QUOTE] Don't forget about functionality as well. You get a great balance of both with Arch and Gentoo.
[QUOTE=User Name;15897323]I think I am going to give arch linux a shot. I heard you can customize almost everything to get a minimal install.[/QUOTE] Go for it. It's really fast too.
Bump for justice.
Arch Linux is amazing. At first I was a bit scared of fucking shit up, and at first I failed to set up my X server. Once I finally got some more skills and finished my install ( Got X running, installed GNOME and customized everything to the bone ) it has been amazing. It's actually really easy once you have the knowledge. Installing it the second time was a breeze. It's way easier ( but not as user friendly ) to manage your system compared to other distros with rc.conf. Want ssh to start up on boot? Just add it to rc.conf, no problems! It also hasn't got devs whining about "AMAGAWD WE WONT PUT THIS IN REPOS IT'S NOT FREE SOFTWARE BAWWWW" like Ubuntu.
[QUOTE=Denzo;16128611]It also hasn't got devs whining about "AMAGAWD WE WONT PUT THIS IN REPOS IT'S NOT FREE SOFTWARE BAWWWW" like Ubuntu.[/QUOTE] What? Ubuntu has tons of non-free stuff. Arch doesn't even have the proprietary Ati driver anymore. :v:
Sorry, you need to Log In to post a reply to this thread.