• What Linux is good for you.
    97 replies, posted
[QUOTE=PvtCupcakes;16129012]What? Ubuntu has tons of non-free stuff. Arch doesn't even have the proprietary Ati driver anymore. :v:[/QUOTE] Well, maybe that's because ATI's Linux drivers suck so much ass they don't want to hurt their users. The NVIDIA proprietary drivers are still in the repos.
[QUOTE=Denzo;16129123]Well, maybe that's because ATI's Linux drivers suck so much ass they don't want to hurt their users. The NVIDIA proprietary drivers are still in the repos.[/QUOTE] Yeah, I think that was the reason. Catalyst does blow. :v:
[B]Damn Small Linux[/B] Also known as DSL, this is the distro you want when your piece of ./sh is older than yourself. So yeah, with the low-end requirements being 486DX you really won't have any problems in any PC you find that has been made in the past decade. As the live-cd distro is less than 50mb, you can fit it in just about everywhere, especially the 50mb card-CD:s. Don't get me wrong, 50mb is filled with apps, like 3 web browsers and nice games. Cost like 1$ a pop, and are the size of CC:s, so burn one and keep in the wallet. Just like a condom, but you probably will get to use it. :smug: You can also install it into the HDD, run it from USB, floppy+network installation, and some fancy frugal installation (I remember that it was cloning the image to the card, so it will be like a live-cd, so you can't fuck it up) to a CF card in a Ide adapter. Those adapters cost 3-5$ including worldwide shipping, just ask from me if interested. Completely silent system with old PC:s, as they won't need active cooling, and the PSU is the only noise generator. Probably next you can install it to your toaster via bread. Modules are also nice, you can just select from a menu and press a button, and it loads the application that you dowloaded. In a live-cd it's nice that you don't have to install stuff, you can drop the modules to some floppy/usb stick and load them from there. [i]Pros[/i] *It works in just about any PC *Fast as hell *Can be used even if you don't know a lot about what's going on under the hood [i]Cons[/i] *Not pretty ([url]http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/images/dsl-4.2.x2.jpg[/url] ugh, but as I watch the apps I don't care) *Not that much software via the modules (Almost all popular ones tho) Conclusion: For low end PC:s and as the Live-distro that you carry around.
[QUOTE=evilking1;16137311][B]Damn Small Linux[/B] Also known as DSL, this is the distro you want when your piece of ./sh is older than yourself. So yeah, with the low-end requirements being 486DX you really won't have any problems in any PC you find that has been made in the past decade. As the live-cd distro is less than 50mb, you can fit it in just about everywhere, especially the 50mb card-CD:s. Don't get me wrong, 50mb is filled with apps, like 3 web browsers and nice games. Cost like 1$ a pop, and are the size of CC:s, so burn one and keep in the wallet. Just like a condom, but you probably will get to use it. :smug: You can also install it into the HDD, run it from USB, floppy+network installation, and some fancy frugal installation (I remember that it was cloning the image to the card, so it will be like a live-cd, so you can't fuck it up) to a CF card in a Ide adapter. Those adapters cost 3-5$ including worldwide shipping, just ask from me if interested. Completely silent system with old PC:s, as they won't need active cooling, and the PSU is the only noise generator. Probably next you can install it to your toaster via bread. Modules are also nice, you can just select from a menu and press a button, and it loads the application that you dowloaded. In a live-cd it's nice that you don't have to install stuff, you can drop the modules to some floppy/usb stick and load them from there. [i]Pros[/i] *It works in just about any PC *Fast as hell *Can be used even if you don't know a lot about what's going on under the hood [i]Cons[/i] *Not pretty ([url]http://www.damnsmalllinux.org/images/dsl-4.2.x2.jpg[/url] ugh, but as I watch the apps I don't care) *Not that much software via the modules (Almost all popular ones tho) Conclusion: For low end PC:s and as the Live-distro that you carry around.[/QUOTE] What would make it pretty would be if you installed a minimalist theme or something.
[QUOTE=nos217;15783777]Eww what the [B]hell?[/B][/QUOTE] I know how you feel. I'd rather not get a distribution from a website that's hardly informative, that uses the name of a different distribution.. We don't even know what's it on about. As far as we know (and I can tell) it's just Ubuntu with a different theme and some more software. There're also some spin-offs.. I don't see the purpose in a "Gamers Edition", seeing it just contains some pre installed games for Linux. Currently, I'm giving Arch Linux a whirl - but I'm a bit stuck with getting it to work with my network.
[QUOTE=Turbis;16143866]What would make it pretty would be if you installed a minimalist theme or something.[/QUOTE] Yes, I tried messing around with them and all, but fluxbox or the other managers (Like Windowmaker) will never become as pretty as KDE or Gnome. But it really isn't a con to me, but seeing as you other guys fap over 4D Desktop cubes defying the laws of nature...
[QUOTE=evilking1;16153001]Yes, I tried messing around with them and all, but fluxbox or the other managers (Like Windowmaker) will never become as pretty as KDE or Gnome. But it really isn't a con to me, but seeing as you other guys fap over 4D Desktop cubes defying the laws of nature...[/QUOTE] <3 window maker. Makes me think I'm running a proprietary UNIX again :D
[QUOTE=evilking1;16153001]Yes, I tried messing around with them and all, but fluxbox or the other managers (Like Windowmaker) will never become as pretty as KDE or Gnome. But it really isn't a con to me, but seeing as you other guys fap over 4D Desktop cubes defying the laws of nature...[/QUOTE] :P Me myself currently running windows xp with the original pre xp gray theme. It's minimalistic so I'd rahter use that haha
Good for hacking... I'm a white hat by the way don't get scared lol
[QUOTE=Dark_dragon1;16195207]Good for hacking... I'm a white hat by the way don't get scared lol[/QUOTE] I almost spat out my coke reading that.
[QUOTE=Dark_dragon1;16195207]Good for hacking... I'm a white hat by the way don't get scared lol[/QUOTE] I'm a Red Hat. :rolleye:
[QUOTE=PvtCupcakes;16204936]I'm a Red Hat. :rolleye:[/QUOTE] kids these days
Linux Mint 7 rocks my socks. [img]http://d2k5.com/sa_emots/emot-holy.gif[/img]
Good article. Definitely want to try some more of these out. =D
Why is this not stickied?
[QUOTE=nos217;16800438]Why is this not stickied?[/QUOTE] This.
It might be a better idea if we make a new thread that is a "portal" (bunch o' links) to all of these guides. Then we can sticky that instead of the Beginner's Guide [i]and[/i] this guide. It would prevent future clutter in the sticky section as we would just add a link to the portal everytime a new important thread came along. Also, we need to moderate ourselves. Right now lazyV is the only with sticky power, so unless we ask and wait, nothing is going to happen.
That's a really good idea. You could PM LazyV.
Ubuntu 9.04, this specific distro changed my mind about Linux. I tried 8.04 and it fucked up to no end and was in no way easy to use. 9.04 fixed all the problems I was having, and made me not totally hate Linux anymore. It also taught me HL2 won't run on an emulator on a computer from 2002 with 512MB of RAM and some hardware problem with either the MoBo or CPU.
[QUOTE=DaCommie1;16955294]Ubuntu 9.04, this specific distro changed my mind about Linux. I tried 8.04 and it fucked up to no end and was in no way easy to use. 9.04 fixed all the problems I was having, and made me not totally hate Linux anymore. It also taught me HL2 won't run on an emulator on a computer from 2002 with 512MB of RAM and some hardware problem with either the MoBo or CPU.[/QUOTE] WINE is not an emulator. :)
I have always liked ubuntu, just tried using gnome-do with docky, amazing!
Up until 9.04, I completely hated ubuntu. I gave 9.04 a try and loved it for a short while. But then back to Debian with me.
[QUOTE=Relic Kylias;16957571]WINE is not an emulator. :)[/QUOTE] heh sorry no. it emulates a windows system so yeah it's an emulator.
[url=http://wiki.winehq.org/Debunking_Wine_Myths#head-a97295d7364a2a87f5769eeff9b5105b61b85761]Not really.[/url]
Okay so instead of making another "Hurr I'm new to Linux help me!" thread to clog this place up I will ask here. I want to install Mandriva but the .iso is exactly 4 MB too big to use on a CD so I have been trying to make a flash drive that can be used to install it. The problem I am having is that I can simply not find a good tutorial on how to do so. The article on the Mandriva wiki was too vague. I was trying it from Windows though. If it would be easier I can just do it off MCNLive which I am running off a flash drive atm.
[QUOTE=redonkulous;17016316]Okay so instead of making another "Hurr I'm new to Linux help me!" thread to clog this place up I will ask here. I want to install Mandriva but the .iso is exactly 4 MB too big to use on a CD so I have been trying to make a flash drive that can be used to install it. The problem I am having is that I can simply not find a good tutorial on how to do so. The article on the Mandriva wiki was too vague. I was trying it from Windows though. If it would be easier I can just do it off MCNLive which I am running off a flash drive atm.[/QUOTE] For a bootable USB drive, use Unetbootin. Getting your PC to boot off USB might be a bit tricky; depends on how old it is. But for the CD, most cd burning apps can do overburn.
Why would they make a distro 4 MB too big? Why not just shave 4 MB off somewhere? Seems exceptionally stupid to me.
[QUOTE=The Pro;16969126]heh sorry no. it emulates a windows system so yeah it's an emulator.[/QUOTE] [b]W[/b]ine [b]I[/b]s [b]N[/b]ot an [b]E[/b]mulator, [b]WINE[/b]. Wine is basically the Windows APIs reverse engineered to run on linux so that Windows programs which think they're calling Windows APIs on Windows are actually calling Wine APIs on linux/BSD/OSX. It doesn't emulate Windows in the way an emulator like VMware does.
I like Sabayon or Mint.
[QUOTE=nos217;17020717]Why would they make a distro 4 MB too big? Why not just shave 4 MB off somewhere? Seems exceptionally stupid to me.[/QUOTE] Yeah I was FFFFFFUUUUUUUUU-ing for a little while. And yeah I can boot off the USB, this computer is new and all pimped out, the cd drive is just from the stone age because I never bothered to upgrade. I'll look into overburning though, and unetbootin.
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