• CIPWTTKT v11: content.rar is missing or corrupted.
    3,482 replies, posted
[QUOTE=Warship;29611971]Like my new avatar? :smug:[/QUOTE] What does that have to do with anything ever? Besides my Avatar is the best.
My avatar is better.
[QUOTE=nikomo;29612371]My avatar is better.[/QUOTE] You almost got me there.
Yay they do exists (judges that understand what the hell there are listing to). [release][h2]IP-Address Is Not a Person, BitTorrent Case Judge Says[/h2][b]A possible landmark ruling in one of the mass-BitTorrent lawsuits in the U.S. may spell the end of the “pay-up-or-else-schemes” that have targeted over 100,000 Internet users in the last year. District Court Judge Harold Baker has denied a copyright holder the right to subpoena the ISPs of alleged copyright infringers, because an IP-address does not equal a person.[/b] In the last year various copyright holders have sued well over 100,000 alleged file-sharers in the United States alone. The purpose of these lawsuits is to obtain the personal details of the alleged infringers, and use this information to negotiate a settlement offer ranging from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars. Lawyers, the public and consumer advocacy groups have compared these practices to extortion, but nonetheless new cases are still being filed every month. This week, however, an interesting ruling was handed down by District Court Judge Harold Baker that, if adopted by other judges, may become a major roadblock for similar mass-lawsuits. In the case VPR Internationale v. Does 1-1017, the judge denied the Canadian adult film company access to subpoena ISPs for the personal information connected to the IP-addresses of their subscribers. The reason? IP-addresses do not equal persons, and especially in ‘adult entertainment’ cases this could obstruct a ‘fair’ legal process. Among other things Judge Baker cited a recent child porn case where the U.S. authorities raided the wrong people, because the real offenders were piggybacking on their Wi-Fi connections. Using this example, the judge claims that several of the defendants in VPR’s case may have nothing to do with the alleged offense either. “The infringer might be the subscriber, someone in the subscriber’s household, a visitor with her laptop, a neighbor, or someone parked on the street at any given moment,” Judge Baker writes. Although the above logic applies to all BitTorrent lawsuits that are currently ongoing, the matter becomes especially delicate when the alleged offense is sharing rather explicit adult titles. “Orin Kerr, a professor at George Washington University Law School, noted that whether you’re guilty or not, you look like a suspect. Could expedited discovery be used to wrest quick settlements, even from people who have done nothing wrong?” Judge Baker writes. Judge Baker further notes that “the embarrassment of public exposure might be too great, the legal system too daunting and expensive, for some to ask whether the plaintiff VPR has competent evidence to prove its case.” Baker concludes by saying that his Court is not supporting a “fishing expedition” for subscribers’ details if there is no evidence that it has jurisdiction over the defendants. Although the ruling is definitely a setback for the copyright holders in mass-BitTorrent lawsuits, it has yet to be seen whether other judges will reach the same conclusion in future cases. If that happens, the end of this type of lawsuit in the U.S. may be near. Texas lawyer Robert Cashman, who represents several defendants in similar lawsuits, agrees that the ruling can be a potential game changer. “We may have just seen the order that may end all future John Doe lawsuits,” he commented in a response. [url]http://torrentfreak.com/ip-address-not-a-person-bittorrent-case-judge-says-110503/[/url][/release]
[QUOTE=Baldr 2.0;29612527]Yay they do exists (judges that understand what the hell there are listing to). [/QUOTE] We need more people who actually know what they are talking about.
[QUOTE=Baldr 2.0;29612527]-snip-[/QUOTE] Oh wow, I never though that would happen Any judge/lawyer even related to torrents seem to think that a .torrent file is a mega-compressed movie
[QUOTE=Tobba;29612650]Oh wow, I never though that would happen Any judge/lawyer even related to torrents seem to think that a .torrent file is a mega-compressed movie[/QUOTE] I know, at least realize that it is a giga-compressed file. But it is nice to see that some people are understanding what many people have been getting out with these torrent cases. There is something that needs to be done and all that can be debated, but there are a lot of things that just aren't handled well in these cases. Especially in terms of explaining what is actually going on to the people that don't understand.
The problem i think is that the people in these high profile cases have to be well experienced and that often means that they are old, Well, Oldish, which migh mean that they don't know everything about the technology. On the flipside, They could bring in someone that has a perfect grasp on the tech, But not a good grasp on the Law and juridics. Best would probably be to send the judjes to a one day course in the basic facts and functions on the tech, Such as .Torrent files, that relates to the case
[QUOTE=BreenIsALie;29613377]The problem i think is that the people in these high profile cases have to be well experienced and that often means that they are old, Well, Oldish, which migh mean that they don't know everything about the technology. On the flipside, They could bring in someone that has a perfect grasp on the tech, But not a good grasp on the Law and juridics. Best would probably be to send the judjes to a one day course in the basic facts and functions on the tech, Such as .Torrent files, that relates to the case[/QUOTE] In several cases, that's been done - in the Oracle v. Google case, the judge took a crash course on Java. I agree that the prosecution quite often deliberately mislead the judges on technical matters, possibly because they themselves were mislead, but a good defense attorney should be able to call in expert testimony to set the matter straight.
[QUOTE=BreenIsALie;29613377]The problem i think is that the people in these high profile cases have to be well experienced and that often means that they are old, Well, Oldish, which migh mean that they don't know everything about the technology. On the flipside, They could bring in someone that has a perfect grasp on the tech, But not a good grasp on the Law and juridics. Best would probably be to send the judjes to a one day course in the basic facts and functions on the tech, Such as .Torrent files, that relates to the case[/QUOTE] Old doesn't necessarily mean don't know anything about technology. That is a pretty bad assumption. It depends on the type of person it is.
Computer Illiterate Old People Who Don't Want To Know.
Can't take anyone seriously who says Cyber.
[QUOTE=Chickens!;29613928]Can't take anyone seriously who says Cyber.[/QUOTE] Cyber Police :v:
[QUOTE=BreenIsALie;29613973]Cyber Police :v:[/QUOTE] Aaah digital forensics :allears: .
[QUOTE=gman003-main;29604329]Cross-posting for great justice (was originally posted in an argument about nationalism in LMAOPix):[/QUOTE] What does this have to do with Computer Illiterate People Who Think They Know Things?
[QUOTE=kaine123;29614303]What does this have to do with Computer Illiterate People Who Think They Know Things?[/QUOTE] Dude, since when has ANYTHING in this thread had anything to do with CIPWTTKT?
i started reading and suddenly though i was in ithe news so i went back, saw h&s and came back in
Plants vs. Zombies is 3.40€ on steam right now Must. Not. Buy
Hey, what operating system would I be if I was born in 94? :v: Yeah I know I'm a page late but people gotta sleep you know.
[QUOTE=gman003-main;29614343]Dude, since when has ANYTHING in this thread had anything to do with CIPWTTKT?[/QUOTE] But atleast the majority of that stuff is related to Hardware and Software.
[QUOTE=SuperDuperScoot;29615009]Hey, what operating system would I be if I was born in 94? :v: Yeah I know I'm a page late but people gotta sleep you know.[/QUOTE] Sleep?. How preposterous If i'm not wrong, Windows 3.11 was shipped in early 94
[QUOTE=Tobba;29614839]Plants vs. Zombies is 3.40€ on steam right now Must. Not. Buy[/QUOTE] No problem. It sucks.
[QUOTE=SuperDuperScoot;29615009]Hey, what operating system would I be if I was born in 94? :v: Yeah I know I'm a page late but people gotta sleep you know.[/QUOTE] You were born in 1994?!?!?! I was already in school learning stuff... Pretty soon I am going to be way to old to be coming to Facepunch.
I was born in July so I looked it up... "July: Microsoft ships the 500,000th copy of Windows NT 3.1. [878.217]" And yes, I was.
So we had a project to create a Sports and Entertainment company. Here's what most people did: Opened up Microsoft Word, found pictures from the internet (using IE8), added slogans and stuff, and then tried to export it as an image :psyduck: The folder we store our projects in is a networked drive where we only have write access for our own files, but once moved into that folder the teacher takes ownership. So, the way Microsoft Office works is that it creates the files, then opens it and writes the data. This doesn't work because once the file is created, you don't own the file, and you can't read it because it's not yours. A classmate of mine does this, and I told him it won't work. He says "but look it's in the folder, it worked" I replied: "It did not work, look at the filesize: 0kbs" Him: "It's in the folder, and it worked so leave me alone" Later that day, the same kid when looking for his saved project file in My Documents, he couldn't find it because XP just throws it at the bottom of the file list, instead of alphabetically ordering it unless you either refresh it or set it to automatically sort alphabetically. His idea "just close the folder and re-open it and it'll be there" :psyduck: So much illiteracy in this class
[QUOTE=Squad;29615157]You were born in 1994?!?!?! I was already in school learning stuff... Pretty soon I am going to be way to old to be coming to Facepunch.[/QUOTE] :respek: Even though I'm a bit younger (-91), it seems I'm older than everyone on FP.
[QUOTE=TehWhale;29615286]So much illiteracy in this class, probably because it's just a [b]bunch of black people[/b] and preps[/QUOTE] That smells racist
-93 here. Looks like i'm rolling with Windows NT :saddowns:
I was born in 1994, too. IIRC '94s are quite a big age group. It's no wonder there's lots of 16 – 17 year olds on FP. [editline]4th May 2011[/editline] Wait which Windows, Sep 1994
[QUOTE=BreenIsALie;29615382]-93 here. Looks like i'm rolling with Windows NT :saddowns:[/QUOTE] Nothing computer-related happened in 1991. I guess the only thing I can say is that my birth brought the fall of the USSR.
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