• Classical music discussion
    534 replies, posted
Yeah, Scönberg talked about the "emancipation" (liberation) of the dissonance; it should be just as important as the consonance. And you gotta admit, it opens up a whole new world of possibilities, when you aren't bound to the original harmonization. :v: [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fy6t8yXPcSQ[/media]
Schoenberg went from being a composer I was outwardly opposed to to being one of my favorites :v: His early tonal stuff is pretty good, too. [editline]27th June 2011[/editline] Currently learning this by him: [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGLcUfbVF3k[/media]
My favourite composers right now are Shostakovich, Chopin and William Byrd.
Debussy's Clair de Lune Good interpretation here: [media]http://vimeo.com/90612[/media]
Very tasteful performance, it's a shame a lot of people don't listen to Debussy's orchestral work and instead just listen to his piano compositions, he composed a lot of his most famous piano pieces when he was still just a student.
[QUOTE=The Maestro;30744306]Schoenberg went from being a composer I was outwardly opposed to to being one of my favorites :v: His early tonal stuff is pretty good, too. [editline]27th June 2011[/editline] Currently learning this by him: [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sGLcUfbVF3k[/media][/QUOTE] I think there is a quite similar major third running around in these two pieces... [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XCZfvwfG9cw&feature=related[/media] [editline]29th June 2011[/editline] Just noticed I'm being an ass... Sorry, wasn't thinking.
[QUOTE=ThunderGod;30765028]Very tasteful performance, it's a shame a lot of people don't listen to Debussy's orchestral work and instead just listen to his piano compositions, he composed a lot of his most famous piano pieces when he was still just a student.[/QUOTE] I've played 2 of his Nocturnes. For some trumped up reason the music institution that heads the program I was in decided not to hire a choir for Sirenes so I was only able to do Nuages and Fetes. :smith: I want to play Sirenes.
[QUOTE=Shostakovich;30765840]I've played 2 of his Nocturnes. For some trumped up reason the music institution that heads the program I was in decided not to hire a choir for Sirenes so I was only able to do Nuages and Fetes. :smith: I want to play Sirenes.[/QUOTE] Are you at a conservatoire or something? I've got to apply to music courses soon and I'm not sure what to go for.
[QUOTE=ThunderGod;30777173]Are you at a conservatoire or something? I've got to apply to music courses soon and I'm not sure what to go for.[/QUOTE] Short answer: yes. Long answer: well, sort of. I wasn't in a conservatory as a college student, I was in the preparatory program of a conservatory. By the way I'm technically homeschooled, so the prep conservatory was only a weekly activity. I'm not exactly sure how music courses work as electives, and I'm definitely not sure how UK courses work.
[QUOTE=Shostakovich;30779925]Short answer: yes. Long answer: well, sort of. I wasn't in a conservatory as a college student, I was in the preparatory program of a conservatory. By the way I'm technically homeschooled, so the prep conservatory was only a weekly activity. I'm not exactly sure how music courses work as electives, and I'm definitely not sure how UK courses work.[/QUOTE] I'm guessing your ambitions are to become a professional classically trained musician?
[QUOTE=AK'z;30782400]I'm guessing your ambitions are to become a professional classically trained musician?[/QUOTE] That would make two of us, then. Although I'm more interested in conducting/composing.
composed/recorded anything? Get a soundcloud so I can follow :3:
Well, currently I've only composed a few pieces, none of which are in a listenable state. I've considered getting a soundcloud before, I'll have to check it out.
[QUOTE=The Maestro;30784851]in a listenable state.[/QUOTE] :colbert: Don't be like that... experimental is what I want to hear. And that is what you will give me. :smug:
[QUOTE=AK'z;30784880]:colbert: Don't be like that... experimental is what I want to hear. And that is what you will give me. :smug:[/QUOTE] I have several hundred unfinished music files. Most are under 5 seconds long, and the phrasing is terrible. (My main weakness is modal change. I cannot ever seem to be able to follow the classic Sonata form I V :|: V I. I end up staying in tonic [i]forever[/i] :smith:)
Were there any "conceptual" classical composers? Who were clear in what they were going to convey. Like Shakespeare but in music form. :downs:
[QUOTE=Shostakovich;30785833]I have several hundred unfinished music files. Most are under 5 seconds long, and the phrasing is terrible. (My main weakness is modal change. I cannot ever seem to be able to follow the classic Sonata form I V :|: V I. I end up staying in tonic [i]forever[/i] :smith:)[/QUOTE] Modal transitions are fucking hard to get to sound good ;__; All I can manage compositional wise is between I and vi and between vi and V
[QUOTE=AK'z;30790514]Were there any "conceptual" classical composers? Who were clear in what they were going to convey. Like Shakespeare but in music form. :downs:[/QUOTE] Well Berlioz's 'Symophonie fantastique' was one of the first major orchestral works that conveyed a vivid story with a programme, but Vivaldi's four seasons is a much more basic take on programme music. Sorry if this isn't the sort of thing you're after, but Berlioz is a great composer and orchestrator. [editline]30th June 2011[/editline] [QUOTE=Shostakovich;30785833]I have several hundred unfinished music files. Most are under 5 seconds long, and the phrasing is terrible. (My main weakness is modal change. I cannot ever seem to be able to follow the classic Sonata form I V :|: V I. I end up staying in tonic [i]forever[/i] :smith:)[/QUOTE] I struggle with this as well, I started as a contemporary musician so my tonality was always really static but I've been trying to compose outside of that mindset recently, maybe try using 'romantic' chromatic chords to aid modulations?
Listening to my Brahms - Bruno Walter compilation. Sounds friggin' awesome.
What piece/orchestra? Another conductor you should check out is Herbert Von Karajan, awesome guy.
[QUOTE=The Maestro;30901466]What piece/orchestra? [/QUOTE] urm... Symphony No. 1 in C Minor I think? That's off the top of my head too. :D
First symphony's good. Be sure to check out both his piano concertos, his third and fourth symphonies, and the tragic overture. [editline]5th July 2011[/editline] Arturo Toscanini does a GREAT tragic overture, btw.
Yes, I have Brahms' tragic overture by Bruno Walter. Can't wait to hear all the symphonies though, they're great listens imo.
If you like Brahms, you should check out Antonin Dvorak. In particular, Stabat Mater, 7th symphony and piano concerto. Wish I could recommend certain recordings but unfortunately with Dvorak I often don't have a preference :sigh:
I thought I'd finally follow up and post the slave songs that became what we now call blues and gospel. Obviously, as slaves sang these songs, as either secret codes to lead others on the way to freedom from slavery, or to keep them happy, they couldn't exactly write them down anywhere, since they hardly knew how to! So, I'll try my best to post versions that I find are very good versions of the songs. Most times, in the lyrics, you'll hear the coding. Swing Low, Sweet Chariot is obviously telling you to keep low, and carry on as the Underground Railroad will bring you "home" or to freedom. Follow The Drinking Gourd is about following the Big Dipper, which points to the North Star and meeting up with a mysterious conductor on the Underground Railroad known as Peg Leg Joe. Swing Low, Sweet Chariot-(As sung by Etta James) [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Thz1zDAytzU[/url] Follow The Drinking Gourd-(As sung by Richie Havens) [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gBOP8t2hlFQ&feature=related[/url] Go Down Moses- (Performed by...?) [url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rp5Zd0bYPjQ&feature=related[/url]
I don't think a classical thread would be complete without this piece: [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUJagb7hL0E[/media] It is truly narcissistic and pretentious, but at the same time it is the only piece in history that relies solely on the listeners interpretation of it.
So horribly pretentious, especially timing the movements.
Are there any classical artists that did unconventional things. Seems like a lot of what I'm hearing is too "complexly good sounding?" :v:
Schoenberg was very unconventional, he just later on reformed his methods. Listen to Leo Ornstein, he rejected the idea that he had to write either dissonant pieces or "tonal" pieces and just wrote whatever he wanted. Also, Ligeti was a very unconventional composer, as was Sergei Prokofiev.
Awesome, care to post an album or two. Place to start?
Sorry, you need to Log In to post a reply to this thread.