• Classical music discussion
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Well, here's Ligeti's [i]Poem for 100 Metronomes[/i] which he wrote as a jab to his fellow Avant-Garde composers: [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QCp7bL-AWvw[/media] And here's Prokofiev's [i]Suggestion Diabolique[/i] [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nGfWVh98p2g[/media]
I like where this thread is going! Since we've gone through a lot more modern stuff, can we venture even further towards the present? If not then I'll put aside the James MacMillan and go way back with some Gregorian Chant! Not a great quality recording unfortunately but I love it's simplicity and it always leaves me with a very poignant calm feeling. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d5p_U8J0iRQ[/media] Since it came up earlier, I was wondering how many composers we have here on facepunch? I applied as a long shot aside a regular university application to study composition at UK conservatories and was universally rejected... Was wondering if anyone else has applied/is studying/would like to study at conservatory? Definitely need to broaden my compositional horizons and where I live makes it quite difficult for me to do so.
While it is true that Schönberg revolutionized the way we compose music (the twelwe-tone method), he still tried to remain loyal to the great german tradition; he used the traditional forms: The adagio, scherzo, adagietto and so forth. Contrary to Schönberg were composers such as Charles Ives, Edgar Varese, Erik Satie and Karlheinz Stockhausen. They all wanted to change not only the way we compose music, but also the way we listen, think and perceive it. They were truly reformists, though I'm to lazy to post examples of all... (Also explore the relation between sound and music - there is much to be considered)
I'm hoping to find some Minstrel's music to post here too. You know that during slavery, when Minstrels traveled about, they were at first all white and made fun of blacks, with many stereotypes. But, when there were some blacks who were free, who could sing well, or dance, or whatever, they would be accepted into Minstrelry groups. As accustomed, the white performers painted their faces black, but, get this, the blacks had to paint their faces too!
I can imagine in the 1800s them hillbilies plucking away. I need some of that stuff :D
[QUOTE=AK'z;30945187]album[/QUOTE] :zoid:
[QUOTE=Hakita;30632427]Tchaikovsky is where its at[/QUOTE] Russian composition and music as a whole is where it is at. Then again, I love Western European music as well, but God damn the Rite of Spring is one of my favorite works. [editline]6th July 2011[/editline] [QUOTE=AK'z;30943861]Are there any classical artists that did unconventional things. Seems like a lot of what I'm hearing is too "complexly good sounding?" :v:[/QUOTE] There are plenty of composers throughout time that decided to break the rules. Igor Stravinsky's Rite of Spring caused a riot when it premiered at a French opera house. Atonal music, along with serialism, is something you should look into if you're looking for generally bat-shit insane music.
[QUOTE=AK'z;30950482]I can imagine in the 1800s them hillbilies plucking away. I need some of that stuff :D[/QUOTE]I've been trying to find some more. I've got some chicken-pickin' on a song from South Carolina called Bee Gum. It's hard as fuck to find anything relating to Minstrel songs. Bee Gum luckily is because of the banjo-chicken pickin'. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c0NLNGS9BFg[/media]
I seriously cannot find any albums of minstrel music. It's dumb, maybe that guy could release a few? :)
[QUOTE=AK'z;30943861]Are there any classical artists that did unconventional things. Seems like a lot of what I'm hearing is too "complexly good sounding?" :v:[/QUOTE] An awful lot of it was just unconventional for the time and really forward thinking like beethoven. Shostakovich was really interesting because he had to try and compose around the communist government but would often hide codes in his music and produced some pretty dissonant stuff. But it's not all fucked up avant garde which I guess is your thing :v:
[QUOTE=AK'z;30961462]I seriously cannot find any albums of minstrel music. It's dumb, maybe that guy could release a few? :)[/QUOTE]I think that it was just a general "music of the times" kinda thing. By that I mean that once it was possibly to record music, it was just...outdated. It was the beginning of ragtime and other more conventional music styles. So Minstrelry was old and done with. Plus, capturing Minstrel music anywhere besides an actual outdoorsy "concert" it wouldn't have been the same.
i don't know much about classical still but you might like to hear Giacinto Scelsi, AKz. Guattro pezzi is bgreat, microtonal stuff. lots of dissonance, and more focus on timbre than on notes [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xIRbD8mtmo[/media] i guess this is in the modern age though
[QUOTE=Pedro the Fuzzy;30974288]I think that it was just a general "music of the times" kinda thing. By that I mean that once it was possibly to record music, it was just...outdated. It was the beginning of ragtime and other more conventional music styles. So Minstrelry was old and done with. Plus, capturing Minstrel music anywhere besides an actual outdoorsy "concert" it wouldn't have been the same.[/QUOTE] Fair enough. I do like Ragtime music a lot, but there are definitely going to be artists that stuck to traditions.
[QUOTE=AK'z;30979231]Fair enough. I do like Ragtime music a lot, but there are definitely going to be artists that stuck to traditions.[/QUOTE] yea people still record traditional music. I'm always into recommendations for that sort of thing :D
I'm fairly sure cigar-box guitars were around in the 1800s. Need more info.
Thought I might give some input on the composers I posted before. Erik Satie was a French composer, who might not seem as important as Schönberg for an example, but when you give him a closer look, he actually seems ahead of his time in the sense that he rejected the traditional purpose of music; to inspire emotions and thoughts. Instead of a composer he saw himself as a "Sound-cleanser", he wanted music to be "furniture" in existence. A piece some of you might know, Gnossienes (a word he came up with himself) nr. 1: [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLFVGwGQcB0[/media] I do find this piece enthralling.
Stravinsky's rite of spring caused a riot at a premiere because it was particularly unconventional [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vf0e_n49dcQ[/media]
Although most of this is the guy advertising his banjos, these are pretty much what a Minstrel's banjo would've looked like, as well as just traditional music. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e8WPYrDy_zY&feature=related[/media] and a reenactment of a minstrel show in the 1950's. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UfiNT6AKG0s[/media]
Bach - Air is fucking amazing. Here's the best version I've found so far: [video=youtube;NlT8yeEYbMs]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlT8yeEYbMs[/video] [editline]8th July 2011[/editline] Oh yeah, I also compose classical music. Should I put up a piece here? Agree for yes, Disagree for no.
There is no classical section in my nearest vinyl record store :-(
[QUOTE=AK'z;31006568]There is no classical section in my nearest vinyl record store :-([/QUOTE] Isn't one for me either, all my records I've either gotten from my parents or eBay. Although once at a garage sale I picked up a 4 LP set of Mahler's first 2 symphonies for 50 cents :smug:
You not allowed to be smug. :colbert: Do you like any electronic styles of classical. Switched on Bach for example?
I love Switched-on Bach, it's one of my favorite albums. Wendy Carlos is a freakin' genius. I generally adore electronic music, such as Stockhausen, Xenakis, etc.
Prokoviev's grandson, Gabriel, composed a concerto for turntables. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1iz9YVMfA34[/media] I quite enjoyed it.
[QUOTE=AK'z;31009840]You not allowed to be smug. :colbert: Do you like any electronic styles of classical. Switched on Bach for example?[/QUOTE] [img]http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-QCCd_JOcmNA/Tdl45GPkApI/AAAAAAAAABU/JOfT4tpg5zU/s400/snow.png[/img] Debussy + synthesizer = <3 [editline]9th July 2011[/editline] btw, someone recommend a good bartok album
Eddie Morton. Midnight Crew. That is all.
[QUOTE=vagrant;31014713] btw, someone recommend a good bartok album[/QUOTE] Personally I'm very fond of Sviatoslav Richter's recordings of Bartoks works for solo piano. I'll fetch you a recording: [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWkXuN5_sik&feature=related[/media]
[QUOTE=vagrant;31014713]btw, someone recommend a good bartok album[/QUOTE] Piano Concerto no.1 in E-minor with Krystian Zimmerman and Pierre Boulez is quite excellent.
I think I'm at a point where I'm becoming more knowledgeable about orchestral music, and thus I'm at that stupid phase (I think) everyone goes through when they find a genre or artist that they thoroughly enjoy and becoming jealous when other people know about that particular genre/artist. But I'm quickly growing out of it, it just happened for a few weeks when people I came into contact with at a choral camp acted like the shit for knowing who Morten Lauridsen was.
I want something moving, and when I say that I mean on par with Schindler's List emotion. Go.
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