• Electronics and Embedded Programming V2
    1,309 replies, posted
  • [QUOTE=DrLuke;30763638]More temperature.[/QUOTE] I don't think he has a soldering iron with adjustable temperature. Are you using leaded or lead free solder?
  • [b]Rules for good soldering[/b] 1. Get a good brand temperature controlled soldering station 2. Use leaded 60/40 or 63/37 (NOT LEAD FREE SHIT) 3. Use a decent chisel or similar tip, only use pencil tips for very fine work 4. That is all you need, some additional flux is also helpful but not required
  • [QUOTE=Chryseus;30764904][b]Rules for good soldering[/b] 1. Get a good brand temperature controlled soldering station 2. Use leaded 60/40 or 63/37 (NOT LEAD FREE SHIT) 3. Use a decent chisel or similar tip, only use pencil tips for very fine work 4. That is all you need, some additional flux is also helpful but not required[/QUOTE] There's nothing wrong with lead free solder. If you have a decent soldering iron you don't need to worry, but you can always buy silver solder if you don't. I was using a cheap crap soldering iron for years and managed with lead free just fine.
  • The only real reason to use lead free is if you are producing boards, leaded solder is easier to work with for beginners, has superior wettability and produces nice shiny joints also the good lead free solders tend to be more expensive than 60/40. Leaded solder is still around for a reason, lead free is just not as good. Maybe I'm a bit too harsh against lead free, but given the choice I will always stick to lead unless lead-free becomes as good and is cheap.
  • Hello, need some advice... [img]http://i54.tinypic.com/2820vw1.jpg[/img] can I wire transformers like that? I am going to try it soon, just to see, what will happen. Oh and H-bridge will output square wave, not sine. And those flybacks are DC of course.
  • [QUOTE=HeatPipe;30771159]Hello, need some advice... [img]http://i54.tinypic.com/2820vw1.jpg[/img] can I wire transformers like that? I am going to try it soon, just to see, what will happen. Oh and H-bridge will output square wave, not sine. And those flybacks are DC of course.[/QUOTE] That should work as long as you get the secondary side phase the right way around, however if you generate too much high voltage (above their rating) the insulation may breakdown in one or both.
  • Updated OP with some more content. [b]edit[/b] Also added a list of suppliers, suggestions welcome.
  • [url]http://www.futurlec.com/cgi-bin/search/search.cgi[/url] Good supplier to me at least.
  • Futurlec is is a terrible supplier, very slow and they often sell fake transistors (and who knows what else)
  • [QUOTE=Chryseus;30872025]Futurlec is is a terrible supplier, very slow and they often sell fake transistors (and who knows what else)[/QUOTE] Fair enough, I had a good experience with them, I guess some have not.
  • Hey guys, anyone heard for Netduino? It's like .NET version of Arduino, also runs Atmel's chip. Is it any good? ( it uses C#). I gotta buy something like Arduino but faster, and something that doesn't runs C...? Any other suggestions?
  • [QUOTE=HeatPipe;30881866]Hey guys, anyone heard for Netduino? It's like .NET version of Arduino, also runs Atmel's chip. Is it any good? ( it uses C#). I gotta buy something like Arduino but faster, and something that doesn't runs C...? Any other suggestions?[/QUOTE] A Netduino is probably the best option if you want an Arduino-like development board that you don't have to program in C/C++ or spend a long time setting up a toolchain for an unsupported language. Also, despite the fact that the Netduino's CPU is also made by Atmel, it uses the 32-bit ARM architecture rather than 8-bit AVR like on the Arduino. There's a list of other alternatives at [URL]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arduino#Non-ATmega_boards[/URL]. Is there any particular reason why you don't want to use C/C++?
  • I've made zero progress on getting my Arduino online successfully through my router, so I've set that idea aside for now and am attempting a simple POV display for my bicycle wheel instead, and getting the code as small as possible([del]566[/del] [del]546[/del] [del]522[/del] 494 bytes so far!), just because. Currently, I'm using direct port manipulation of a single port along with the _delay_us() function from avr-libc, and I can't really think of any other way to make it smaller, unless simply using the Arduino library but none of the functions isn't causing the whole library to be optimized out by the compiler. I expect that the code will get larger once I get my hands on a hall-effect sensor and start calculating wheel speed. [code] /* POVthing Hopefully for a bicycle wheel! Uses pins 0-7, PORTD */ // Libraries #include <util/delay.h> // Constants const byte numLines = 14; // Variables byte image[numLines] = { B10000000, B01000000, B00100000, B00010000, B00001000, B00000100, B00000010, B00000001, B00000010, B00000100, B00001000, B00010000, B00100000, B01000000, }; void setup() { DDRD = B11111111; // set pins 0-7 as output }; void loop() { for (int i = 0; i < numLines; i++) { PORTD = image[i]; _delay_us(1000); } }; [/code] As for the internet-via-router idea, I can't seem to find a serial-to-ethernet proxy that's both simple enough for me to get working AND visible to the outside world.
  • [QUOTE=HeatPipe;30771159]Hello, need some advice... [img]http://i54.tinypic.com/2820vw1.jpg[/img] can I wire transformers like that? I am going to try it soon, just to see, what will happen. Oh and H-bridge will output square wave, not sine. And those flybacks are DC of course.[/QUOTE] As long as you don't exceed the voltage or current rating on the coils of the transformers you'll be alright.
  • Decided to ditch small codesize until I got the bikePOV working, I got the bikePOV working, and it's going pretty well. I didn't have any zipties, so it's all attached to the wheel with some twisted solid-core wire, except for the reed switch and magnet, which are attached with the double-sided foam tape that they came with. [img]http://imgkk.com/i/ngvl.jpg[/img] [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rHlpb_LxBqk[/media]
  • [QUOTE=Lapsus;30885769]I've made zero progress on getting my Arduino online successfully through my router, so I've set that idea aside for now and am attempting a simple POV display for my bicycle wheel instead, and getting the code as small as possible([del]566[/del] [del]546[/del] [del]522[/del] 494 bytes so far!), just because. .[/QUOTE] If you want to code part smaller then store the byte array in the EEPROM [editline]4th July 2011[/editline] [QUOTE=Lapsus;30885769] As for the internet-via-router idea, I can't seem to find a serial-to-ethernet proxy that's both simple enough for me to get working AND visible to the outside world.[/QUOTE] Unless you want to piss about with a TCP stack if your going down your best off just getting a sheild or getting a chip to handle it for you EG (ENC28J60-I/SP)
  • True. I still hope that someday you will solder it all onto a perfboard and give it a nice and finished look :smile:
  • [QUOTE=benjojo;30890049]Unless you want to piss about with a TCP stack if your going down your best off just getting a sheild or getting a chip to handle it for you EG (ENC28J60-I/SP)[/QUOTE] Well, ideally I'd like to install [url=http://www.dd-wrt.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=242203]ser2net[/url] on the router, as that'll handle all the TCP stuff so I can just port my little processing webserver over to the arduino, but I haven't the slightest idea on how to compile it, for the router or otherwise, as I'm utterly clueless when it comes to a distribution of linux that isn't ubuntu (and even then I can't figure out how to compile things! :downs:). I know an ethernet shield is the easiest way to do it, but there's no way I can even begin to afford one. [editline]4th July 2011[/editline] [QUOTE=DrLuke;30890425]True. I still hope that someday you will solder it all onto a perfboard and give it a nice and finished look :smile:[/QUOTE] Well, ideally I'd like to eventually turn this into something larger, like the [url=http://www.adafruit.com/products/5&zenid=e464d0b862212f17073210f51aeab440]Adafruit SpokePOV[/url], but that's likely a ways off for the moment.
  • [img]http://i.imgur.com/QoMBX.png[/img] A quick block diagram of my power supply I'm working on. Derp forgot to add voltage feedback wires.
  • [QUOTE=Rupert;30884839]A Netduino is probably the best option if you want an Arduino-like development board that you don't have to program in C/C++ or spend a long time setting up a toolchain for an unsupported language. Also, despite the fact that the Netduino's CPU is also made by Atmel, it uses the 32-bit ARM architecture rather than 8-bit AVR like on the Arduino. There's a list of other alternatives at [URL]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arduino#Non-ATmega_boards[/URL]. Is there any particular reason why you don't want to use C/C++?[/QUOTE] C# is becoming widely used among industry there, but heck, I ordered Arduino anyway, I can't go wrong can I? I am still gonna use C# in Visual Studio, tomorrow will be experimenting day.
  • [QUOTE=HeatPipe;31074431]C# is becoming widely used among industry there, but heck, I ordered Arduino anyway, I can't go wrong can I? I am still gonna use C# in Visual Studio, tomorrow will be experimenting day.[/QUOTE] Maybe I misunderstood you, but you can't program an Arduino using C# and Visual Studio. If you want to use a decent IDE to write code for your Arduino you can use Eclipse, there's a guide for setting it up at [url]http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Code/Eclipse[/url]
  • [QUOTE=Rupert;31085787]Maybe I misunderstood you, but you can't program an Arduino using C# and Visual Studio. If you want to use a decent IDE to write code for your Arduino you can use Eclipse, there's a guide for setting it up at [url]http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Code/Eclipse[/url][/QUOTE] I honestly can't see any reason you would ever need (or even [i]want[/i]) a beefy IDE like Eclipse to do Arduino stuff. You have, what, like 16kB code space? Somehow I don't think your projects are ever going to be so big you need all those features.
  • [QUOTE=ROBO_DONUT;31085848]I honestly can't see any reason you would ever need (or even [I]want[/I]) a beefy IDE like Eclipse to do Arduino stuff. You have, what, like 16kB code space? Somehow I don't think your projects are ever going to be so big you need all those features.[/QUOTE] The code search and navigation features are quite useful, especially for working with libraries. You also have version control integration, call tips, better control of build settings, all of which are lacking in the Arduino IDE.
  • [QUOTE=Rupert;31085787]Maybe I misunderstood you, but you can't program an Arduino using C# and Visual Studio. If you want to use a decent IDE to write code for your Arduino you can use Eclipse, there's a guide for setting it up at [URL]http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Code/Eclipse[/URL][/QUOTE] Uhhhh.... no you can't use C#, but of course [URL="http://www.arduino.cc/playground/Code/VisualStudio"]you can use visual studios[/URL]