• How did you get into programming?
    85 replies, posted
  • I started with HTML, not really a programming language, but I fascinated using <marquee>'s and <frame>'s hehe My real first programming language was mirc script, i made a script, bots and some game prototypes using picture window. This was in 2000 +-
  • School library had a acorn computer with a bbc electron emulator. And books on BASIC.... Time++; // ;)
  • Think I was 10-11 when another kid ~6 years older than me living in my flat showed me his QBasic programs, which got me very interested. I then proceeded to try and program simple text adventure games while nagging him for help, because I had no clue what I was doing. He wasn't happy.
  • Professional dicking about in many languages and many engines since the age of 10, not really getting anywhere until i got older. I guess what i started with was HTML and the real programming language was Visual Basic (found a old CD somewhere)
  • My programming origins were a bit more sinister than most here. Back in 2002, a Danish version of Habbo Hotel called "Netstationen" was all the rage at school. You got paid in the game's currency for being online, and used this currency to purchase outfits, and furnishing your apartment. Unfortunately, the game required you to be active in order to cash your check, so just leaving your computer on while in school wasn't an option. There were tonnes of rumors about people having programs that allowed them to stay online despite these precautions, and since nobody felt like sharing their money-printers for free, I decided to do some research on my own. Very soon, I discovered AutoIt. It was very innocent at first. I made a quick program that would move your character around at random intervals, suspecting that the administration might pick up on it, if I moved every 10 seconds on the clock, and used a function that identified groups of pixels on the screen to locate the message box that would appear every hour to inform you of your paychecks arrival, and deny you it, if it wasn't clicked. Looking for ways to improve my baby, I added a few features like window position detection, so you wouldn't have to position your mouse at the top left of the window as you used to, a hotkey for closing it, and of course.. Automatic login. Pretty soon, I had managed to complete a pretty cool program that let me shovel in fake currency 24 hours a day, and being proud of my achievement, I decided to show it off. I started by sharing it with some friends in school, but once word got out, I soon realized that people were willing to pay good(well, fake) money for it. I started selling it, and was pretty damn proud of myself. .. And then it hit me. There were people out there who were using my program, and entering their usernames and passwords for accounts with amazing riches. And that's when I discovered the _INetMail() function of AutoIt. Before I knew it, I had more furniture and money than I knew what to do with, and I had recruited a friend of mine for 50% of the earnings, to help move the goods from new salesman accounts to our real ones, to avoid detection, as well as managing the hotmail account where all the information was sent to. We had a pretty good system. We'd sell it to everyone who wanted to buy it, telling them that they were free to sell it on, and we made sure to wait at least a few days before emptying the accounts of our unsuspecting victims. Looking back, the whole setup was quite ingenious. The pyramid-scheme-like structure of it all, made it really hard to trace the root of the program back to us, and if they did, we could just say that we got it from some John Doe. As with most school fads however, Netstationen died a natural death a month or so later. My interest had been peaked though, and in the following years I got to try out a thousand different things, some more successful than others.
  • I was around GMod Lua.. Got boring went over to PHP and Web Development. Sniffed c++ and C# for a time.. Never had time to actually learn it.
  • [QUOTE=Dr Magnusson;35402522]My programming origins were a bit more sinister than most here. Back in 2002, a Danish version of Habbo Hotel called "Netstationen" was all the rage at school. You got paid in the game's currency for being online, and used this currency to purchase outfits, and furnishing your apartment. Unfortunately, the game required you to be active in order to cash your check, so just leaving your computer on while in school wasn't an option. There were tonnes of rumors about people having programs that allowed them to stay online despite these precautions, and since nobody felt like sharing their money-printers for free, I decided to do some research on my own. Very soon, I discovered AutoIt. It was very innocent at first. I made a quick program that would move your character around at random intervals, suspecting that the administration might pick up on it, if I moved every 10 seconds on the clock, and used a function that identified groups of pixels on the screen to locate the message box that would appear every hour to inform you of your paychecks arrival, and deny you it, if it wasn't clicked. Looking for ways to improve my baby, I added a few features like window position detection, so you wouldn't have to position your mouse at the top left of the window as you used to, a hotkey for closing it, and of course.. Automatic login. Pretty soon, I had managed to complete a pretty cool program that let me shovel in fake currency 24 hours a day, and being proud of my achievement, I decided to show it off. I started by sharing it with some friends in school, but once word got out, I soon realized that people were willing to pay good(well, fake) money for it. I started selling it, and was pretty damn proud of myself. .. And then it hit me. There were people out there who were using my program, and entering their usernames and passwords for accounts with amazing riches. And that's when I discovered the _INetMail() function of AutoIt. Before I knew it, I had more furniture and money than I knew what to do with, and I had recruited a friend of mine for 50% of the earnings, to help move the goods from new salesman accounts to our real ones, to avoid detection, as well as managing the hotmail account where all the information was sent to. We had a pretty good system. We'd sell it to everyone who wanted to buy it, telling them that they were free to sell it on, and we made sure to wait at least a few days before emptying the accounts of our unsuspecting victims. Looking back, the whole setup was quite ingenious. The pyramid-scheme-like structure of it all, made it really hard to trace the root of the program back to us, and if they did, we could just say that we got it from some John Doe. As with most school fads however, Netstationen died a natural death a month or so later. My interest had been peaked though, and in the following years I got to try out a thousand different things, some more successful than others.[/QUOTE] I had the Skyrim soundtrack playing while I read this post and holy shit I swear it was one of the most epic moments of my life. Really though, shame the game died so soon afterwards! You really were in the right place at the right time by the sounds of it... Imagine the evil, evil things you could've inflicted on those poor innocent cheaters! :v:
  • I was walking down the street one day and then suddenly I thought, 'uh gunna proh gram'. And then I sucked. [editline]3rd April 2012[/editline] But seriously the first time I was interested was with the WCIII world editor and their simplified boolean values and shit. (By the way, it was amazing).
  • When I was like 6 and was trying to make a webpage on notepad by typing in like "draw picture at middle take from hard drive" I was like "Dad why doesn't this work" and he bought me a book on html Learned some of that then got into G-Mods Wire Mod logic gates and when E2 came out started "programming" on that, Now I do simple games on XNA and stuff
  • I really properly got started (I'd programmed for like a year before hand, but I just don't really count that) last year when I was taking first year computer science at University through a highschool program, it was first semester so basically intro to programming, boring as fuck, had to find something else to do. Somehow I ended up getting into Runescape bots, I started learning Java for them in the lectures and started making crappy scripts. Ended up doing it for nearly a year up until RSBuddy shutdown near the end of last year (iirc). Most fun I've ever had programming, haven't been able to find something else programming wise I really want to do since. I became good at programming doing that, I might have thought I was good before but I was terrible. It fueled my desire to do programming as a career.
  • I got interested in programming shortly after I got access to the internet, this was in the days of 56k modems of course, I initially started with HTML and JScript (Microsoft's version of JavaScript) then moved on to C/C++
  • I started programming by the moment I saw my uncle just sitting there just chillin', programming stuff on his laptop (EXPENSIVE AS HEEELLL at that time), I asked him to teach me his ways, he step-by-step taught me how to do a simple point-and-click, moving target game on Delphi. After that, I got Game Maker and allowed my mind to run free, learned GML and crap, while still using Delphi from time to time. Then GMOD, I started learning stuff, and finally made a Bycicle, that some people want to kill me for because I promised to update it but never had the drive to. During that time I already had enough skills on random config and got my first half-time job, I've helped on a company of a friend of the family, you know the deal, buy the hardware, install and config programs, help people with their shit, etc, I still do that, but I'm still the help-guy. (I'm still not on college, so it doesnt matter.) Then I also started learning how to use C# on Linux (cross-compiling for embedded devices!) and "ported" a few games. (HHexen, HHeretic and D1X for the Dingoo, a nice little cheap handheld, that I have to find some drive to fix the R button.)
  • When I was 8 my dad bought me a c++ book, but I couldn't understand it so he bought me this thing called the games factory 2 in anticipation of a game programming camp I was going to go to. I got so good at it that by the time camp rolled around I had mastered it, so I got bumped up to the 3d game class in torque. I screwed around with that a bit,not doing much then moved down to blitz plus, then blitzmax. I also started working with nxt robots (went to Fll states) and moved onto c++ when I was 14, and I've been here ever since.
  • I don't remember when I actually got an interest in it. The earliest cited reference to it is age 5. My first actual language was C. I could do basic input/output programs. Then I started jumping around on languages, and found Python. Now I'm primarily a Python programmer (and barely remember anything about C other than #include statements). I'm not a super-wizard at it (despite what some friends of mine say) but I consider myself "acceptable".
  • About 5 or 6 years ago I started scripting very simple stuff in this game called SRB2, which was basically Sonic the hedgehog in 3D that ran on the DOOM2 engine. Eventually I realized what little I could do with scripting and I took a Programming class last school year, where we did QBasic the first semester and Visual Basic the second.
  • Game Maker 5.3. About 10 years ago. Neighbor pointed me to it and I taught myself through trial and error. I even know the first major bug I fixed for my first game (don't put object creation code in step event). Eventually I moved from Game Maker to other frameworks. GML taught me a lot about the concepts of OO so Java wasn't hard to pick up (also since I started studying Computer Science at university). Worked my way through XNA and did a lot of GMod modding with Lua. Also taught myself web development with PHP / Javascript / HTML / SQL combos. Lower level languages like C++ never really interested me because of all the tedious memory management. I prefer conjuring up results as fast as possible thus I stick to high level territory.
  • [QUOTE=Serapth;35343526]Mine was easy... When I was 7 or so, my Dad bought me an Atari 800XL computer, we took it home, hooked it up, then he erased the DOS disks... so I had nothing else to do with it, except play with the ROMed version of BASIC. So, thats what I did and thats when I started to program. That was also the day my dad developed a serious phobia of all things computer related.[/QUOTE] I still have an 800XL boxed. I need a tape deck for it though. I started doing bits and pieces for the student website when I was 14, wrapped my head around javascript and PHP, dabbled in a bit of LSL on second life as well. 17 now and I think its time to move on to a proper language. So by the end of this year I'm going to know either some variant of C, or I'm going to know Python. [editline]12th April 2012[/editline] Back on Second Life, I was on the opengrid and wrote a basic stargate which could dial between sims, like the ones on the main grid except far less polished. I had it hooked up to a database of gates and addresses on my web server.
  • I got into programming at the age of about 14. I wanted to learn and create my own gamemodes for SA-MP, a multiplayer mod for Grand Theft Auto: San Andreas. The scripting language it used was [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pawn_(scripting_language)]PAWN[/url], which had a very similar syntax to C and C++ except there were a lot of differences which I took for granted, such as dynamic typing. I think the way I learnt how programming worked was kind of wrong as I never looked at any tutorials; instead I just learnt from existing code, that someone else has made, and then looked at the documentation if I didn't understand it. This was very slow though and I only did it if I wanted to change anything in a stock gamemode that came with the Development Kit, eventually I got around nearly everything. I probably didn't make anything good but I'm glad I stuck with it, as I learnt a lot and I think I wouldn't know what to do as a career if I didn't.
  • I started with QBASIC and a DOS prompt when I was 8. Also messed around with a Mattel Aquarius I bought at a garage sale. Lacking a tape drive I couldn't save programs so I didn't program on it very often. Eventually worked my way through VB, Java, C++, C, PHP and Javascript. I find there are many many people who are born to be programmers out there, so I tend to stick to electronics instead.
  • I got my first computer, a [url=http://www.vintage-computer.com/franklinace1200.shtml]Franklin Ace 1200[/url], when I was 2, so I was already accustomed to [i]using[/i] a computer when we got a 386 PC some years later (when I was around 10 or 11). Started learning about DOS and batch files, and at some point stumbled across QBasic. I learned BASIC from reading the QBasic help file and the example programs that came with it. One day my father came home with a boxed copy of Borland Turbo C for me, bought at the suggestion of a programmer friend of his. I tried learning C, but the book I had &#8212; "Absolute Beginner's Guide to C", which explained a computer and its programs by analogy to Chef Chuck and his recipes &#8212; wasn't very good. Three times I read that book, and three times I got to the chapter on pointers, got hopelessly confused (why would I want to use a pointer to a variable when I can just use the variable?) and forgot everything I knew. But my father also gave me a copy of VB6, so I was OK to just stick with BASIC, which I was pretty good with. Later, during the summer between 11th and 12th grade, I got a book on C++ and learned that (and finally [i]understood[/i] pointers). Since then I've explored lots of other languages: Perl, Python, PHP, Java and C#, PostScript, TeX, and most recently Haskell, to name a few. Got a degree in computer science, and now I'm a professional software engineer.
  • From trying to lean Expression and Expression2 gates in Garry's Mod (wiremod).
  • Started out with GameMaker in 2002 after a friend had shown it to me. Joined a team of GML scripters. We made some things, namely a media player and a benchmarking utility, all in GameMaker. Kinda screwed around with GameMaker till last year. Now and then I would try to do C#, but I always ended up making stupid fake web browsers. Last year I had to make a small game as an entry assignment for my current school. Programming it in C++ would get me the highest score, so I figured I would try some C++. Picked the basics up fairly quick and created a game, which was, albeit buggy, pretty cool for my first C++ thing. Right now, I am mainly programming in C++, as this is what we use in class. Learned some cool stuff recently, such as SIMD. I plan to try out some other (scripting) languages during the summer break.