• Computer Science killed programming as a hobby for me. Anybody else?
    107 replies, posted
  • Before entering university, programming was a hobby of mine and it was what I did with most of my spare time. I entered Computer Science because I already had knowledge of programming and I was good with computers and had an interest in computers. During my first year of computer science I found that the tedious and boring Java/Python assignments killed my hobby of programming. I find it very difficult to sit down and work on a game or project now because school has sort of made me sick of programming. I already knew I didn't want to do programming as a career, but I didn't think it would make me want to like programming any less. I've developed a new hobby on the computer but I'm usually bored when I'm at home now since I'm not as eager to pass time by programming. Anyway, I'm definitely not complaining since this has led me to a more social life, but I'm just wondering if this has happened to anybody else in Computer Science? Have you became sick of programming after taking Computer Science classes?
  • I can understand where you're coming from. I took AP CS in High School and completely ignored all the boring text book assignments and just did my own thing :v:
  • Yep, except for me it happened at work before I even went to university. University is just mind numbingly easy. I think you'll find this is very common. You'll get back into it eventually, you just need to find a stimulating project.
  • [QUOTE=icantread49;35602361]I can understand where you're coming from. I took AP CS in High School and completely ignored all the boring text book assignments and just did my own thing :v:[/QUOTE] Doing only what the course is telling you will kill your interesting in programming dead. If you've programmed before the course, it will be dull and tedious. Do something more interesting programming in your spare time and it should re-kindle your interests.
  • Yeah, that's the effect that getting a job in the industry is having on me.
  • It happened to me to, but not after Computer Science, but after a introductory programming class. When I got to computer science it actually killed it so bad that I just couldn't get around to doing any programming and I'm very near failing CS. I just had to tough it up and jump back in. I had to force myself to work on what I wanted, and eventually I found it fun again.
  • Good to know that I may find it interesting again. I have no problem losing the hobby, I just don't want to get to the point where I don't even want to do my assignments any more. [QUOTE=darkrei9n;35602412]It happened to me to, but not after Computer Science, but after a introductory programming class. When I got to computer science it actually killed it so bad that I just couldn't get around to doing any programming and I'm very near failing CS. I just had to tough it up and jump back in. I had to force myself to work on what I wanted, and eventually I found it fun again.[/QUOTE] Good to hear. I've also been struggling to finish even the easiest assignments. Good to know that you eventually found it fun again. Hopefully I do the same when the assignments get harder and more interesting.
  • What kind of assignments do you guys get? I've heard that in my school's Intro to CS class their assignments involve doing stuff with turtle graphics and matlab and stuff
  • I think college CIS classes have had a opposite effect on me. I like to program more after taking the classes and I have even entered a programing competition. The 100 series at my college are useless and I didn't learn anything new until the end of my CIS 210 class. Oh yeah they are teaching java at my school. What is killing it for me is the discreet math series. Literally it will be the end of me...
  • [QUOTE=ZenX2;35603601]What kind of assignments do you guys get? I've heard that in my school's Intro to CS class their assignments involve doing stuff with turtle graphics and matlab and stuff[/QUOTE] The first course was python and the assignments were mostly programs to do simple calculatons and stuff based on input. It went from a basic program outputting your name after you enter it to a program to calculate your BMI based on your age, weight and stuff. The last Python assignment was a checkers game in the console window. The semester that I just finished was Java stuff. The first assignment just outputted your astrological sign (capricorn, taurus, etc). based on your birthday making sure you validate the days of the month and shit. The second assignment was the same thing but you had to split it into different classes for an object oriented approach. Third assignment we had to make a linked list. Luckily I already knew how they worked because when I first learned them it took me a long time to get the concept. There were two assignments that were simulations/games, and then the last assignment was a GUI assignment. Both semesters were the same professor, so maybe it was just his particular assignments that were boring. I'm really hoping we move to C/C++ next year since I find that language a lot more interesting to use. I don't think we get to use C/C++ until 3rd year though. [QUOTE=Dark7533;35604099] What is killing it for me is the discreet math series. Literally it will be the end of me...[/QUOTE] Holy shit me too. I'm failing that course and have to retake it in the summer. I'm not even sure if I will understand that shit even the second time around.
  • I've got in to it more since starting a CS degree, find I read around it more and have a go at textbooks and research materials I wouldn't have dreamed of before.
  • While I am at uni, I hate programming and all things Computer Science. When summer comes around, I find myself enjoying it again. Generally I've hated the university experience. It's stress after stress with no clear boundary between work time and home time. There's no "best time of your life" about spending hours every day doing coursework and shitting your pants about exams, but then the majority of people I see seem to just coast through relatively care free. Unfortunately I'm really anxious about these things, and when you are like that, university just sucks the fun out of everything.
  • Because honestly, how many hot-dog stand simulators can you do before killing yourself?
  • I'm in a similar situation myself, I just find my Java class extremely boring. Don't get me wrong my professor teaches well and is a fun person overall. I just can't sit in class for 2 hours to learn something I can learn in 30 minutes. Not mention the assignments take a long time to do, mix that with weekly essay assignments from other classes and I just lose motivation to do anything programming related.
  • I think it's more like you just feel like doing other stuff. Everything can be fun but when you start doing it full time specifically you aren't going to want to keep doing it even more. Same with English and Art etc... Also it's pretty unhealthy to spend all your time at your computer programming
  • [QUOTE=Jallen;35606445]While I am at uni, I hate programming and all things Computer Science. When summer comes around, I find myself enjoying it again. Generally I've hated the university experience. It's stress after stress with no clear boundary between work time and home time. There's no "best time of your life" about spending hours every day doing coursework and shitting your pants about exams, but then the majority of people I see seem to just coast through relatively care free. Unfortunately I'm really anxious about these things, and when you are like that, university just sucks the fun out of everything.[/QUOTE] Yeah I feel so stressed in Uni. Meanwhile my friend failed every class and doesn't give a shit while I worry I might get a 50% on my last test. School ended and I've been opening up my old projects looking at them but I just don't have the motivation to work on them. I probably will when I get bored throughout the summer. Looks like the way I'm feeling is pretty natural based on the replies here :v:
  • [QUOTE=thisBrad;35602308]Before entering university, programming was a hobby of mine and it was what I did with most of my spare time. I entered Computer Science because I already had knowledge of programming and I was good with computers and had an interest in computers. During my first year of computer science I found that the tedious and boring Java/Python assignments killed my hobby of programming. I find it very difficult to sit down and work on a game or project now because school has sort of made me sick of programming. I already knew I didn't want to do programming as a career, but I didn't think it would make me want to like programming any less. I've developed a new hobby on the computer but I'm usually bored when I'm at home now since I'm not as eager to pass time by programming. Anyway, I'm definitely not complaining since this has led me to a more social life, but I'm just wondering if this has happened to anybody else in Computer Science? Have you became sick of programming after taking Computer Science classes?[/QUOTE] This is how I always felt about everything in school. It's just miserable. They push along everyone at the same pace and cover the same material, regardless of their aptitude or specific interests. When you're ahead and you've taken an active interest in something, you're forced to slow down and to study in the same direction as everyone else, instead of finding a niche and focusing on that. When you're behind, it's absolute hell for obvious reasons. I'm particularly salty about the whole situation currently because I'm taking an entire semester of [i]upper-level[/i] humanities (for an [i]engineering[/i] degree) just to satisfy a graduation requirement. Because of this requirement, I'm wasting time and money on things that don't benefit me, my teachers have to deal with unenthusiastic, unwilling students, and I'm constantly stressing over the fact that there's a very real chance I could find myself with no degree, trying to pay off an ungodly amount of loan debt, because of some stupid technicality which exists only because some jackass thought the phrase 'we produce well-rounded students' sounded good in a pamphlet. It's assembly-line academics, and it's garbage.
  • Yeah my degree requires 16 option classes that have nothing to do with the degree. I'm taking astronomy right now because it looked interesting and easy but I don't see how it will benefit me in any way for a career. Hell they don't even let you take more "computer science" classes as your options. I guess the only benefit I get is an exploration of interests and chances to make new friends outside my field. Completely agree with you that school is simply an assembly line. They could have handed me the final exam for some of my courses right off the bat and I would have passed and wouldn't have to pay for the lectures I didn't even attend.
  • [QUOTE=ROBO_DONUT;35613083]This is how I always felt about everything in school. It's just miserable. They push along everyone at the same pace and cover the same material, regardless of their aptitude or specific interests. When you're ahead and you've taken an active interest in something, you're forced to slow down and to study in the same direction as everyone else, instead of finding a niche and focusing on that. When you're behind, it's absolute hell for obvious reasons. I'm particularly salty about the whole situation currently because I'm taking an entire semester of [i]upper-level[/i] humanities (for an [i]engineering[/i] degree) just to satisfy a graduation requirement. Because of this requirement, I'm wasting time and money on things that don't benefit me, my teachers have to deal with unenthusiastic, unwilling students, and I'm constantly stressing over the fact that there's a very real chance I could find myself with no degree, trying to pay off an ungodly amount of loan debt, because of some stupid technicality which exists only because some jackass thought the phrase 'we produce well-rounded students' sounded good in a pamphlet. It's assembly-line academics, and it's garbage.[/QUOTE] The 'Well-rounded' student stuff is such a load of bollocks. We have some presentations given at our University by a careers advisor, she makes getting a job sound like herding cattle. Great.
  • [QUOTE=thisBrad;35613353]Yeah my degree requires 16 option classes that have nothing to do with the degree. I'm taking astronomy right now because it looked interesting and easy but I don't see how it will benefit me in any way for a career. Hell they don't even let you take more "computer science" classes as your options.[/QUOTE] I kind of cheated a little and took more engineering and comp. sci. classes for all my general electives (they allow it at my school, but 'encourage' you to take other things). To the point where I was running out of ECE courses that I could take without having to finagle my way into CS dept. courses -- some of which are labelled as ECE courses, but have prerequisites that are unattainable by eng. majors (lol, registrar).
  • [QUOTE=ROBO_DONUT;35613083]This is how I always felt about everything in school. It's just miserable. They push along everyone at the same pace and cover the same material, regardless of their aptitude or specific interests. When you're ahead and you've taken an active interest in something, you're forced to slow down and to study in the same direction as everyone else, instead of finding a niche and focusing on that. When you're behind, it's absolute hell for obvious reasons. I'm particularly salty about the whole situation currently because I'm taking an entire semester of [i]upper-level[/i] humanities (for an [i]engineering[/i] degree) just to satisfy a graduation requirement. Because of this requirement, I'm wasting time and money on things that don't benefit me, my teachers have to deal with unenthusiastic, unwilling students, and I'm constantly stressing over the fact that there's a very real chance I could find myself with no degree, trying to pay off an ungodly amount of loan debt, because of some stupid technicality which exists only because some jackass thought the phrase 'we produce well-rounded students' sounded good in a pamphlet. It's assembly-line academics, and it's garbage.[/QUOTE] To compound this, I don't think students are really receiving the education they need. I think less people go into university knowing what they want to do or already knowing some of the subject, so when they dumb down the entire content to meet the lowest common denominator, they wreck everyone instead of just the lowest. I'm constantly flabbergasted by the second-and-third level comp-sci students, having yet to do enough practical programming to solve problems or to know where to look for help. I'm self-taught and not in a comp-sci major, so every line of code I write I kicked and screamed for, and feel that I know more about actual end-result programming. Sure I don' know all of the organizational methods of code or the names for solutions to problems, but given time I can learn them, and in the mean time I can write code that produces an end result instead of spending all my time planning. Not to insult any comp-sci majors around FP, but from talking to half a dozen at my school/a few graduates from others (who didn't know programming going in), this is the impression I get.
  • [QUOTE=Lord Ned;35613552]To compound this, I don't think students are really receiving the education they need. I think less people go into university knowing what they want to do or already knowing some of the subject, so when they dumb down the entire content to meet the lowest common denominator, they wreck everyone instead of just the lowest. I'm constantly flabbergasted by the second-and-third level comp-sci students, having yet to do enough practical programming to solve problems or to know where to look for help. I'm self-taught and not in a comp-sci major, so every line of code I write I kicked and screamed for, and feel that I know more about actual end-result programming. Sure I don' know all of the organizational methods of code or the names for solutions to problems, but given time I can learn them, and in the mean time I can write code that produces an end result instead of spending all my time planning. Not to insult any comp-sci majors around FP, but from talking to half a dozen at my school/a few graduates from others (who didn't know programming going in), this is the impression I get.[/QUOTE] Pretty much this, most computer science students rely on the core concepts they were taught in their programming classes. The thing is they know how certain concepts work, but they have trouble going about solving problems mostly due to the fact they really don't go outside the boundaries. This area of field takes practice and self-learning most of the time if not all. I see many students freaking out most of the time over a simple error not knowing what to do.
  • Well not as a hobby, but what killed computer science for me was object-oriented programming in C++. I mean, my major is electrical engineering, but after talking that class it just cemented the fact that I would never do a CS major. My worst memory is putting 14 consecutive hours into a single assignment and only finished roughly 70% of it. Second worst was writing a 30 page exam in a 45 minute time slot. It was comp sci for engineers so the prof really pushed us. I did fantastic overall but the material was just so dry...so damn dry. Ultra heavy workload with boring material is just a recipe for something I'd never do twice.
  • I'm the same. I'm not a strong programmer so I find a lot of it very hard and not explained as well as it could of been. Jumping into things like OS, we currently have a project to make a chat type program where people join into the chat and all messages are sent to everybody in the chat. But besides that we also have to make a games compendium of 3 games and they are due the day after each other. We got 7 assignments in our last 5 weeks along with 2 in class tests. It would be all fine and dandy if these were spaced out but for some reason they didn't so it just causes more stress. I honestly find it more fun learning from people on Facepunch or other tutorials on the internet, they teach you things that you would want to do usually instead of boring things in College. I hate college.
  • [QUOTE=No_Excuses;35617708]Well not as a hobby, but what killed computer science for me was object-oriented programming in C++. I mean, my major is electrical engineering, but after talking that class it just cemented the fact that I would never do a CS major. My worst memory is putting 14 consecutive hours into a single assignment and only finished roughly 70% of it. Second worst was writing a 30 page exam in a 45 minute time slot. It was comp sci for engineers so the prof really pushed us. I did fantastic overall but the material was just so dry...so damn dry. Ultra heavy workload with boring material is just a recipe for something I'd never do twice.[/QUOTE] Uhm. What's hard about object-oriented programming?
  • [QUOTE=Jawesome;35613990]Pretty much this, most computer science students rely on the core concepts they were taught in their programming classes. The thing is they know how certain concepts work, but they have trouble going about solving problems mostly due to the fact they really don't go outside the boundaries. This area of field takes practice and self-learning most of the time if not all. I see many students freaking out most of the time over a simple error not knowing what to do.[/QUOTE] This is how it is in my intermediate java class. The professor teaches us a concept using an example and gives us an assignment thats almost the exact same as the example. He also gives us a ton of starter code and comments. Its not really challenging at all at that point because he gives us way to much. We aren't really encouraged to think outside the box. If he gave us no starter code and comments most people would be doing terrible in there. In high school my teacher had us make games for 3 years, and basically his approach was to give us the basic idea and then run with it, allowing us to figure things out for ourselves and do things our own way. The concepts are important but being able to come up with your own solution is equally important.
  • [QUOTE=Darkest_97;35621029]This is how it is in my intermediate java class. The professor teaches us a concept using an example and gives us an assignment thats almost the exact same as the example. He also gives us a ton of starter code and comments. Its not really challenging at all at that point because he gives us way to much. We aren't really encouraged to think outside the box. If he gave us no starter code and comments most people would be doing terrible in there. In high school my teacher had us make games for 3 years, and basically his approach was to give us the basic idea and then run with it, allowing us to figure things out for ourselves and do things our own way. The concepts are important but being able to come up with your own solution is equally important.[/QUOTE] They make it possible for non-programmers in the first year, and even the second year is pretty easy. When it comes to the third year you will not get the guidance you are getting now. My experience of the final year, which I'm a few weeks away from completing, is they give you a vague task and you basically just have to get it done. I have no idea why you would complain about something not being challenging. When it's challenging it's stressful as hell because - a. Until you start it, you often don't know if you'll even be able to do it b. When you are doing it, you often have no idea if you are doing it right c. If you encounter significant problems, you are screwed It is honestly beyond my comprehension that anyone would wish for it to be more challenging. If I want to learn more I do it in my own time. I'd rather not be assessed on it, thanks.
  • [QUOTE=Jallen;35621552]They make it possible for non-programmers in the first year, and even the second year is pretty easy. When it comes to the third year you will not get the guidance you are getting now. My experience of the final year, which I'm a few weeks away from completing, is they give you a vague task and you basically just have to get it done. I have no idea why you would complain about something not being challenging. When it's challenging it's stressful as hell because - a. Until you start it, you often don't know if you'll even be able to do it b. When you are doing it, you often have no idea if you are doing it right c. If you encounter significant problems, you are screwed It is honestly beyond my comprehension that anyone would wish for it to be more challenging. If I want to learn more I do it in my own time. I'd rather not be assessed on it, thanks.[/QUOTE] I guess I want it to be more challenging because its insanely easy for me and I like to program. Though I understand what you mean, I haven't dealt with upper level courses obviously.
  • Our assignments were so easy I felt like I was coding for no reason. I enjoy coding a lot more when I get results, and more challenging assignments would make me feel like I am actually progressing and getting results as I program instead of just throwing in a bunch of code to match the features on the assignment. I was talking to someone in 3rd year and he said the assignments are very vague and you never know where to begin. Luckily I've been programming for years so I won't be focussing on the programming aspect but more the design and structure of the assignment. I had a few friends who have never programmed before and found the first year to be hell. Looking forward to my next years. I'm also hoping I can get into more of the system admin, networking, etc classes instead of the hardcore programming classes :v:
  • Oh, I've also realized that Computer Science teachers are jackasses as well. So don't worry, its not you. For some reason they want to kill any and all of your solutions to a problem that aren't how they would do it.