• What are you working on? May 2012
    2,222 replies, posted
  • [QUOTE=ryandaniels;35909864]"Trying to turn a profit" is the driving force behind the entire infrastructure of the planet. Why exactly is treating education as a business, and students as customers, such a terrible idea?[/QUOTE] Because education shouldn't be about making another cog in the machine, it should be about inspiring people to learn and investigate. You have to be invested in the teaching, not your next pay-check.
  • because a large portion of the money that students pay for their education goes towards the profits of the parent company, instead of back into the school to help teach students. [url]http://www.cracked.com/article_18660_why-you-should-beware-schools-from-late-night-tv-ads.html[/url]
  • [QUOTE=danharibo;35909891]Because education shouldn't be about making another cog in the machine, it should be about inspiring people to learn and investigate. You have to be invested in the teaching, not your next pay-check.[/QUOTE] And how exactly does the form of incentives change this? Btw teachers are all "for profit", even in public/not-for-profit schools.
  • we're not talking about the teacher salaries, that's not a "profit", it's an expense that the school pays in order to better the education of the students [editline]11th May 2012[/editline] the article I posted explains it well
  • [QUOTE=ryandaniels;35909906]And how exactly does the form of incentives change this? Btw teachers are all "for profit", even in public schools.[/QUOTE] I'm talking about the institution, not the teachers themselves. It's the same with exploration, you don't see private enterprise sending probes to Jupiter's moons do you?
  • [QUOTE=danharibo;35909920]I'm talking about the institution, not the teachers themselves. It's the same with exploration, you don't see private enterprise sending probes to Jupiter's moons do you?[/QUOTE] My point was that your argument that dollars = not caring about education was fallacious. Also, you're going to have to present a more compelling case why the government needs to involved in all education, not just a vague analogy to space programs. Yes, the government has a unique position to support space exploration that the private sector may not have, but that doesn't mean anything and everything can be said to need government involvement.
  • My love of aviation, and my spring semester ending, has recently led me to start making a dogfighting game using C# and Unity as a long term project. [video=youtube;4q94ldZuO-8]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4q94ldZuO-8&feature=youtu.be[/video] Not much to show currently, but I nearly have movement finished, just really need yaw controls and to speed up/slow down the plane when it dives/climbs, and maybe allow the player to temporarily throttle up to for a bit of extra speed. Shooting is definitely still a heavy WIP. I wanted to mix realistic and arcadey flight mechanics so banking the plane causes it to yaw along it's local Y axis much like it does in real life, or at least in all of the combat flight simulators I've played, so to maintain a level turn you do have to pitch up while turning. All visual assets and terrain in that video are by no means final, they're just being used for testing. I have two people who want to help me choose an art-style and come up with some concepts. The basic idea is a cartoony setting heavily influenced by WWI era aviation.
  • What I'm saying is simply that for a lot of people, and for a lot of jobs, there's no need for the nonsense that is the current education system. I don't refute the value of scholarship, of the research that's done. But why is it so awful for a person to go get trained to do what they want to do, without being treated like shit by teachers who have been groomed to think that they are gods, without having to jump through the hoops of english literature and health and history classes? I'm sorta going after the whole college establishment here btw, something I think would be solved by treating students more like what they are, customers who are paying to learn something so they can support themselves, not the children of 18th century wealthy landowners who need to become "well learned" so they can be socially competitive.
  • For most people, it is a waste of time and money to go to a for-profit school. As Jo has mentioned, most of the funds does not go back into your education. And that's pretty obvious once you actually get into a for-profit school. However, for-profit universities tend to have more specific degree plans. This can be good, it can be bad. For example, my specific degree is "Game & Simulation Programming (GSP)." At a community college you will not usually get something so specific. This is how the universities draw people in. Why are they bad? Because their teachers are bad, most of the time. It is clear whenever I have anyone except the two primary GSP instructors. There are some [b]shitty[/b] teachers out there. Even with a shitty teacher, you can learn the course material. For me, I refuse to take a class relevant to my interests and not learn anything. I teach myself and ask questions if necessary. For others, "oh it's just a blow off class." Then they get their degree piled with debt and a shitty education. This is the university's fault for accepting people who do not care. Getting into a university is no bragging right, for the most part, because they accept [b]ANYONE[/b]. It is also the student's fault, because they do not put fourth the effort to learn. There are pros and cons and it is different for every school and every person. Debating it any further is useless. [b]So back on the topic of programming[/b], anyone played around with smart pointers in C++? I decided to write one similar to Obj-C's memory management system (with the whole retain keyword). It makes me wonder why more people do not use smart pointers... [cpp]int main() { vector<ptr<Player>> players; // ptr<Player> instead of Player*, otherwise no change, "players" frees itself once nothing else references it for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { players.push_back(new Player()); players[i]->x = 0; players[i]->y = 0; } return 0; }[/cpp] ptr class: [url]http://pastebin.com/AJygPEq7[/url]
  • [QUOTE=ryandaniels;35910028]What I'm saying is simply that for a lot of people, and for a lot of jobs, there's no need for the nonsense that is the current education system. I don't refute the value of scholarship, of the research that's done. But why is it so awful for a person to go get trained to do what they want to do, without being treated like shit by teachers who have been groomed to think that they are gods, without having to jump through the hoops of english literature and health and history classes? I'm sorta going after the whole college establishment here btw, something I think would be solved by treating students more like what they are, customers who are paying to learn something so they can support themselves, not the children of 18th century wealthy landowners who need to become "well learned" so they can be socially competitive.[/QUOTE] Bad teachers are a problem, and they should be trained or removed. I don't understand that point, you shouldn't have to pay for education - civilisation relies on educated people to continue it, education should be paid for by your taxes.
  • Finally got sfml2 to play nice with gwen. All I need to do now if properly parse json, and use that to load all of the entities. [img]http://i.imgur.com/oO51q.png[/img] and then suddenly error: [img]http://i.imgur.com/RuiVT.png[/img] (gee thanks debug mode that helps a lot) fixed it: [img]http://i.imgur.com/EjaG8.png[/img] i forgot to error check if a certain node was an array or not. so when it was a node within a node instead it flipped the fuck out now to just load the entities themselves!
  • [QUOTE=danharibo;35910136]Bad teachers are a problem, and they should be trained or removed. I don't understand that point, you shouldn't have to pay for education - civilisation relies on educated people to continue it, education should be paid for by your taxes.[/QUOTE] When did we start talking about free college? Does such a thing even exist yet? (The only example I can think of is Udacity) Although I do support the idea; of free education.
  • [QUOTE=ryandaniels;35910346]When did we start talking about free college? Does such a thing even exist yet? (The only example I can think of is Udacity) Although I do support the idea; of free education.[/QUOTE] Do you not have public education in the country you reside?
  • community colleges and some state schools are around the same price as a lot of for-profit schools
  • [QUOTE=ryandaniels;35909964]My point was that your argument that dollars = not caring about education was fallacious. Also, you're going to have to present a more compelling case why the government needs to involved in all education, not just a vague analogy to space programs. Yes, the government has a unique position to support space exploration that the private sector may not have, but that doesn't mean anything and everything can be said to need government involvement.[/QUOTE] i don't think the argument was ever "money is bad down with capitalism!!", it was more about all that stuff that was outlined in the article he posted it's not that profit is an issue all by itself, obviously you need to make money to pay staff and get supplies, where it becomes an issue is when the focus of the school is lying to students and tricking them into abusive situations and massive loans for a sub-par education that won't be respected by employers and won't leave you with a significant amount of new knowledge. the reason a government is in a better position to offer effective and affordable education is because its the [B]government[/B]. they have tons of money and by default they don't run for profit, they run to provide infrastructure and keep themselves afloat, the majority of excess money is put back into the program to make it better and more efficient.
  • [QUOTE=danharibo;35910366]Do you not have public education in the country you reside?[/QUOTE] Public as in free, no, not for higher education, as far as I know. (US)
  • [QUOTE=jalb;35910042] [b]So back on the topic of programming[/b], anyone played around with smart pointers in C++? I decided to write one similar to Obj-C's memory management system (with the whole retain keyword). It makes me wonder why more people do not use smart pointers... [cpp]int main() { vector<ptr<Player>> players; // ptr<Player> instead of Player*, otherwise no change, "players" frees itself once nothing else references it for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { players.push_back(new Player()); players[i]->x = 0; players[i]->y = 0; } return 0; }[/cpp] ptr class: [url]http://pastebin.com/AJygPEq7[/url][/QUOTE] People probably don't use smart pointers because people learning C++ aren't aware of them, and like C it provides a bare set of language features. Of course people who write C++ for a project will be better able to memory management or will use smart pointers.
  • time to resuscitate this thread with an electric field [img]http://i.imgur.com/ZbUQA.png[/img]
  • [QUOTE=danharibo;35910136]Bad teachers are a problem, and they should be trained or removed.[/QUOTE] The sad part is that it's not always possible to train them. For instance my school has problems with some of the sciences (mainly physics and chemistry) because we have a lot of great equipment. Actual scientists that know a lot about science and extremely little about teaching get hired to teach here because it affords them time to use equipment they'd otherwise have to gain access to in more difficult ways. Teaching is a secondary objective for these people and the school is fine with that because they still get to say that they've got so-and-so as a teacher in their physics department and it looks good. The community college a couple miles down the road is known to have far better physics and chemistry courses simply because the teachers there know about this problem at the big universities and go there strictly to teach.
  • Just gave a "class" on Enums in Java in the middle of the lab, because our preceptors, PhD students who get paid to help people with shit like this, decided to sit behind their desk shouting GOOGLE at everyone who asked for help on the coursework. Worst bit is, I bet I'll hit by the plagiarism filter now as well.
  • [QUOTE=jalb;35910042]For most people, it is a waste of time and money to go to a for-profit school. As Jo has mentioned, most of the funds does not go back into your education. And that's pretty obvious once you actually get into a for-profit school. However, for-profit universities tend to have more specific degree plans. This can be good, it can be bad. For example, my specific degree is "Game & Simulation Programming (GSP)." At a community college you will not usually get something so specific. This is how the universities draw people in. Why are they bad? Because their teachers are bad, most of the time. It is clear whenever I have anyone except the two primary GSP instructors. There are some [B]shitty[/B] teachers out there. Even with a shitty teacher, you can learn the course material. For me, I refuse to take a class relevant to my interests and not learn anything. I teach myself and ask questions if necessary. For others, "oh it's just a blow off class." Then they get their degree piled with debt and a shitty education. This is the university's fault for accepting people who do not care. Getting into a university is no bragging right, for the most part, because they accept [B]ANYONE[/B]. It is also the student's fault, because they do not put fourth the effort to learn. There are pros and cons and it is different for every school and every person. Debating it any further is useless. [B]So back on the topic of programming[/B], anyone played around with smart pointers in C++? I decided to write one similar to Obj-C's memory management system (with the whole retain keyword). It makes me wonder why more people do not use smart pointers... int main(){ vector<ptr<Player>> players; // ptr<Player> instead of Player*, otherwise no change, "players" frees itself once nothing else references it for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++) { players.push_back(new Player()); players[i]->x = 0; players[i]->y = 0; } return 0;} ptr class: [URL]http://pastebin.com/AJygPEq7[/URL][/QUOTE] That's very nice, I normally implemented Class::Ref() and Class::UnRef(); I'll be sure to use this from now on :v: [editline]11th May 2012[/editline] Is that not shared_ptr?
  • [QUOTE=Parakon;35914533][IMG]http://niggaupload.com/images/atiIw.gif[/IMG] I made a mirror[/QUOTE] Does he have a face on both sides of his head?
  • I traded character customization for less directional frames (no up or down) so yes
  • [QUOTE=Parakon;35914533][IMG]http://niggaupload.com/images/atiIw.gif[/IMG] I made a mirror[/QUOTE] Since the camera is coming from an angle above, he should move in the opposite direction in mirrorworld. The closer he is to the mirror, the "lower" he gets.
  • [QUOTE=Maurice;35914909]Since the camera is coming from an angle above, he should move in the opposite direction in mirrorworld. The closer he is to the mirror, the "lower" he gets.[/QUOTE] My brain hurts thinking of that. I hate perspective. Still im making a 3D game :v:
  • [QUOTE=Maurice;35914909]Since the camera is coming from an angle above, he should move in the opposite direction in mirrorworld. The closer he is to the mirror, the "lower" he gets.[/QUOTE] [img]http://niggaupload.com/images/9PUs2.gif[/img] fixed it up a bit, still needs some work
  • [QUOTE=Parakon;35916420][img]http://niggaupload.com/images/9PUs2.gif[/img] fixed it up a bit, still needs some work[/QUOTE] Fucking mirrors how do they work!!! :v: