• What are you working on? May 2012
    2,222 replies, posted
[QUOTE=amcfaggot;36042121]hopefully not to the point where they're inclining something else[/QUOTE] I think I'm starting to see a pattern with your jokes.
[QUOTE=krix;36043903]Quick question: Is there any noticeable difference in performance comparing SDL and GLFW used with OpenGL? SDL/GLFW would be used for window management, of course.[/QUOTE] no.
I'm not to sure how many of you know about this but there is this new device coming out called The Leap. It's a motion detection device for using gesture controls. Whats the big deal? if you have some nice looking projects in your back pocket you can get the device and SDK for free. So [URL="https://live.leapmotion.com/"]check [/URL]it out. I wanted to get one but I'm to cheap and I don't have any awesome projects, but I know a lot of you guys work on some amazing things!
[QUOTE=Mr.Heal;36045090]I'm not to sure how many of you know about this but there is this new device coming out called The Leap. It's a motion detection device for using gesture controls. Whats the big deal? if you have some nice looking projects in your back pocket you can get the device and SDK for free. So [URL="https://live.leapmotion.com/"]check [/URL]it out. I wanted to get one but I'm to cheap and I don't have any awesome projects, but I know a lot of you guys work on some amazing things![/QUOTE] I saw the video for this product earlier, it looks like the kind of technology that Apple would innovate with. The gestures would also work really well with the Windows 8 start screen.
[QUOTE=jalb;36041087]I suppose I could use a struct, not sure why I didn't think of that earlier. I'm writing a resource manager to sync up multiple threads. I can point to any data type (hence void*) and I need to know how large they are for memcpy. It's a template class so it's in the header. I hate having "using" in .h to force other files to do the same. The "difficult" part comes with syncing up to a remote. Note that I don't actually find it difficult anymore, but it was my first time around.[/QUOTE] git init git remote add origin [email]git@github.com:blah/blah.git[/email] git push origin master done
[QUOTE=Jacko2007;36045242]I saw the video for this product earlier, it looks like the kind of technology that Apple would innovate with. The gestures would also work really well with the Windows 8 start screen.[/QUOTE] I wouldn't say innovate. I don't think gesture control is going to win against a mouse and keyboard. But when I want to sit on my couch and browse Facepunch, being able to browse that way would be awesome. I may sit down and focus on a single project to present them with to try and get access to the SDK, because it seems like something really fun to mess around with. We shall see, I'd like to see the specs on it before I put any money on it.
[QUOTE=swift and shift;36045328]git init git remote add origin [email]git@github.com:blah/blah.git[/email] git push origin master done[/QUOTE] Isn't there something about SSH keys or whatever that you need to do?
[QUOTE=Darwin226;36045366]Isn't there something about SSH keys or whatever that you need to do?[/QUOTE] [code]ssh-keygen -t rsa -C "your_email@youremail.com"[/code] Done.
[QUOTE=Overv;36045455][code]ssh-keygen -t rsa -C "your_email@youremail.com"[/code] Done.[/QUOTE] So simple... -r rsa -C.... WHAT? ;( Where do you go to learn to speak robot? I feel like a retard not knowing.
[QUOTE=Darwin226;36045467]So simple... -r rsa -C.... WHAT? ;( Where do you go to learn to speak robot? I feel like a retard not knowing.[/QUOTE] Note that you do this only once per machine you work on, then you can forget about it. [editline]21st May 2012[/editline] I really can't figure out why I keep getting missing alpha mask textures. GTA stores textures in .txd texture dictionaries, and for each object it gets told which .txd has all its textures. Except they never seem to contain any alpha textures, and they're in separate .txd files and you're not even told which.
[QUOTE=Ziks;36045578]Note that you do this only once per machine you work on, then you can forget about it.[/QUOTE] I have been using git with bitbucket for months and have never done anything with SSH
[QUOTE=Richy19;36045715]I have been using git with bitbucket for months and have never done anything with SSH[/QUOTE] But what if The Man intercepts your commits?!
[QUOTE=Ziks;36045845]But what if The Man intercepts your commits?![/QUOTE] He will laugh at my code :/
[QUOTE=Darwin226;36045467]So simple... -r rsa -C.... WHAT? ;( Where do you go to learn to speak robot? I feel like a retard not knowing.[/QUOTE] To be honest it isn't that hard to understand really. You just need to remember a few of those bits to actually use CLI applications. "ssh-keygen" is the application obviously. A key generator. -t is a option flag, the "rsa" after it specifies the method used to generate the key (I assume seeing as it's a cryptography algorithm) -C is another option flag that specifies something else (like fuck I know, I should probably look at setting up a git repo at some point), taking the provided e-mail address as the value it uses.
[QUOTE=Darwin226;36045467]So simple... -r rsa -C.... WHAT? ;( Where do you go to learn to speak robot? I feel like a retard not knowing.[/QUOTE] Commands in terminal are simple really. They're usually formatted like so: <command> <options> <arguments> In this case the command is ssh-keygen, the options are -t and -C, and there is no arguments. Most Linux distributions come with handy offline manual pages where you can look up commands, [url=http://linux.die.net/man/1/ssh-keygen] but here's an online one here.[/url] Using that you can see that the option -t specifies the (t)ype of they key generated, and -C adds a (C)omment. [editline]sadf[/editline] Oh damn you hexpunK; let me be helpful! :(
[QUOTE=hexpunK;36045900]To be honest it isn't that hard to understand really. You just need to remember a few of those bits to actually use CLI applications. "ssh-keygen" is the application obviously. A key generator. -t is a option flag, the "rsa" after it specifies the method used to generate the key (I assume seeing as it's a cryptography algorithm) -C is another option flag that specifies something else (like fuck I know, I should probably look at setting up a git repo at some point), taking the provided e-mail address as the value it uses.[/QUOTE] But why in God's name is it named "t" and "C"? Does it hurt someone to be a bit more explicit?
[QUOTE=Darwin226;36046002]But why in God's name is it named "t" and "C"? Does it hurt someone to be a bit more explicit?[/QUOTE] I dunno. Being verbose in CLI applications is actually more of a pain in the ass for the developer and user. The developer has to write a few extra characters for the argument checks if they use verbose names. And if they want both verbose and shorthand arguments, they have to add checks for both. The average CLI user expects argument flags like -t and -C because they are easy to remember once you learn them, and take little time to actually write. As a rule of thumb if I make an application with argument flags like that, I add both shorthand and verbose versions (so, -l and -log both would enable logging of the operations the program performs or something).
[QUOTE=Darwin226;36046002]But why in God's name is it named "t" and "C"? Does it hurt someone to be a bit more explicit?[/QUOTE] Yes, the more time wasted writing out long commands is less time spent having your computer do something. [editline]asdf[/editline] aaa hexpunK, you did it again!
[QUOTE=Naelstrom;36045977]Oh damn you hexpunK; let me be helpful! :([/QUOTE] Your explanation helped me a bit there. I now know what -t and -C actually mean :v: [QUOTE=Naelstrom;36046070]aaa hexpunK, you did it again![/QUOTE] Sneaky like a fart in the wind.
[QUOTE=Darwin226;36046002]But why in God's name is it named "t" and "C"? Does it hurt someone to be a bit more explicit?[/QUOTE] Guessing -t is for type, and -C is comment, so you can label this key as belonging to that email or something. Edit: blah late
I've decided that gcc's linker will never stop hating me when I try to connect asm with c, so I decided to redo my OS completely in assembly (or most of it): [IMG]http://i.imgur.com/gCmkM.png[/IMG] I am not sure what that note and circle are doing there.
[QUOTE=supersnail11;36046406]I've decided that gcc's linker will never stop hating me when I try to connect asm with c, so I decided to redo my OS completely in assembly (or most of it): [IMG]http://i.imgur.com/gCmkM.png[/IMG] I am not sure what that note and circle are doing there.[/QUOTE] Note is CR, circle is LF (\r\n)
Forgive me for being such a noob, but I have a question. I wan't to make a program(application? Call it what you want.) for keeping track of my finances. I was wondering what would be the best and easiest way to make it? (as far as programming languages) I'm willing to learn the necessary steps to make it, I just want to make it, it's my new project. Here's what I'd like to be able to do; I'd like to open it up, and have an input dialogue pop up that has the categories "Deposit" "Spending" and "Balance" (may change) If Deposit --> Another box comes up and has 3 different inputs (with a button to add more?) -all with a "add funds" button- then I can input my paychecks/other money I have in each box, and it would total them up and add 60% of the total to the "savings" account and 40% to the "checking" account. Kind of like separate databases. If Spending --> similar to deposit, whereas there are input boxes and a "Spend" button. I could enter in my spending and it would take the current balance of the "checking" database and subtract my spending. If Balance --> Simply display the totals in both the "savings" database and the "checking" database. It would be an added luxury, if I could view all the deposits I've made, but it's not needed. So assuming this is possible -don't know why it wouldn't- what would be the best way to go about this? As stupid as it sounds, I've tried excel, but I don't know how to use it so when I enter in one number, it takes it and stores it in a different cell, then when I come back later, I can input it in the same place, and have it store it in the next cell (to the previously stored). This all making sense?
[QUOTE=Ohfoohy;36048727]Forgive me for being such a noob, but I have a question. I wan't to make a program(application? Call it what you want.) for keeping track of my finances. I was wondering what would be the best and easiest way to make it? (as far as programming languages) I'm willing to learn the necessary steps to make it, I just want to make it, it's my new project. Here's what I'd like to be able to do; I'd like to open it up, and have an input dialogue pop up that has the categories "Deposit" "Spending" and "Balance" (may change) If Deposit --> Another box comes up and has 3 different inputs (with a button to add more?) -all with a "add funds" button- then I can input my paychecks/other money I have in each box, and it would total them up and add 60% of the total to the "savings" account and 40% to the "checking" account. Kind of like separate databases. If Spending --> similar to deposit, whereas there are input boxes and a "Spend" button. I could enter in my spending and it would take the current balance of the "checking" database and subtract my spending. If Balance --> Simply display the totals in both the "savings" database and the "checking" database. It would be an added luxury, if I could view all the deposits I've made, but it's not needed. So assuming this is possible -don't know why it wouldn't- what would be the best way to go about this? As stupid as it sounds, I've tried excel, but I don't know how to use it so when I enter in one number, it takes it and stores it in a different cell, then when I come back later, I can input it in the same place, and have it store it in the next cell (to the previously stored). This all making sense?[/QUOTE] It's possible with excel - though you'd have to learn some visual basic to do it. Unless you want to get in to programming for serious, you'd probably want to just learn VB - I know it sounds bad, but it's easy and you already have all the tools to do it. If you do want to get into programming, it's whatever you want. I'd recommend C#, a lot of people would recommend C++, and more would recommend even more. it depends on your skill, your interests, and your willingness to learn.
I was given 2 boxes of floppies that had 25 floppies per box last week. They have a lifetime warranty! Uhh.. They'll make good drink coasters I guess. I think my floppy drive broke.
[QUOTE=Map in a box;36049028]I was given 2 boxes of floppies that had 25 floppies per box last week. They have a lifetime warranty! Uhh.. They'll make good drink coasters I guess. I think my floppy drive broke.[/QUOTE] Don't make me tell you to get a blog. Instead, look at my no extra character hello world: [img]http://i.imgur.com/FwRhY.png[/img] Now I need to clear the screen.
Quick question: I am working on a library and looking for an appropriate license for the code. I am, however, using the STL included with VS2010, for strings. Is it a problem if I release my code under the GPL or alike?
[QUOTE=supersnail11;36049075]Don't make me tell you to get a blog. Instead, look at my no extra character hello world: [img]http://i.imgur.com/FwRhY.png[/img] Now I need to clear the screen.[/QUOTE] mov edi, 0xb8000 mov ecx, 25*80*2 xor al, al rep stosb [editline]22nd May 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=Darwin226;36045467]So simple... -r rsa -C.... WHAT? ;( Where do you go to learn to speak robot? I feel like a retard not knowing.[/QUOTE] the
[QUOTE=Natrox;36049495]Quick question: I am working on a library and looking for an appropriate license for the code. I am, however, using the STL included with VS2010, for strings. Is it a problem if I release my code under the GPL or alike?[/QUOTE] Use the LGPL.
All this talk of command line git, bleh. [url]http://mac.github.com/[/url] for Mac is sexy as fuck, and [url]http://windows.github.com/[/url] is a horrible abomination with Metro UI.
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