• Want to start on game programming, but i have got no idea even about GUI.
    7 replies, posted
  • I'm programming on C. Yes it is old language but still good. My programs always used console for communication with end-user. I know that there are 'graphics.h' and 'graphics2.h' header for making graphical "things" on C. But i cant find any compiler that have them on resource headers list. Maybe i need to learn another language for making games. I'm really n00b at gaming, i dont know what is game engine, why people use directx or opengl (of course i know that there are libraries, but i dont know much about them). I there is a book, or maybe some website that you guys advice me i would loved to learn form these resources. Because there are lots of resources about gaming on internet, and i dont know, which one is for me, and better.
  • Games such as [URL="http://www.nethack.org/"]Nethack[/URL] use the Curses library, which is a console-based GUI of sorts; while it isn't very practical in commercial gaming Curses shares many concepts with GUI libraries like GTK+ or the Windows API. Thus, it might make a good bridge for the gap. You should download [URL="http://pdcurses.sourceforge.net/"]PDCurses[/URL] if you're on Windows, otherwise there should be NCurses in your package manager of choice.
  • First of all I don't know where you are getting graphics.h and graphics2.h. Second of all there is pretty much no reason not to use C++ since its almost totally backwards compatible with C. Third of all you should read this book: Game Engine Archetecture. You can rent a computer version from barnesandnoble for 180 days for around 20 bucks. Fourth you need to familairize yourself with one of the 3D graphics APIs (OpenGL and DirectX). I personally recommend OpenGL using the book OpenGL Superbible. And if you need a quick definition for engine: It's what renders 3D images using 3D geometry coordinates and 2D texture images. It can also typically preform physics simulations and has other faculties as well.
  • [QUOTE=flayne;36238916]First of all I don't know where you are getting graphics.h and graphics2.h. Second of all there is pretty much no reason not to use C++ since its almost totally backwards compatible with C. Third of all you should read this book: Game Engine Archetecture. You can rent a computer version from barnesandnoble for 180 days for around 20 bucks. Fourth you need to familairize yourself with one of the 3D graphics APIs (OpenGL and DirectX). I personally recommend OpenGL using the book OpenGL Superbible. And if you need a quick definition for engine: It's what renders 3D images using 3D geometry coordinates and 2D texture images. It can also typically preform physics simulations and has other faculties as well.[/QUOTE] Jesus christ man the guy just got out of making console games and you're telling him to start learning directx? Why not tell him to learn assembly while you're at it?
  • I'd recommend SDL or SFML for learning, go for it! Both are pretty straightforward to use and well documented, and the guides are all around the internet.
  • I second SFML, it's very nice to use, and it's modern. SDL is proven, but is showing age, especially when used in conjunction with C++. It also provides less than SFML. If you don't mind switching languages however, I've used XNA with success and I've (shameless plug) updated the gwen-dotnet port to it, and I've totally converted it to XNA too (works on Windows Mobile, Xbox 360 and PC, albeit with a little effort on your part "emulating" the mouse, example code is provided). [url]https://bitbucket.org/ben1066/gwen-dotnet-xna/src[/url]
  • [QUOTE=chipset;36239245]Jesus christ man the guy just got out of making console games and you're telling him to start learning directx? Why not tell him to learn assembly while you're at it?[/QUOTE] Sorry I kind of misinterpreted his question. To CYBER_COWBOY: That is what you need to do if you want to get totally independent from using other peoples engines and helper libraries, etc. You should maybe experiment around with an already developed engine like Panda or Ogre, then move on to just helper libraries (math libraries, file format libraries, etc) then do what I said. But if you want to totally learn game design all around you need to do what I said originally eventually.
  • I was a big C programmer before I learned C++ to use SFML. The transition isn't very hard, especially if you're already familiar with OOP. I made a pretty full-featured SFML game without needing any advanced C++ features. The SFML site has some nice tutorials for version 1.6 (though I recommend version 2.0) that teach you the basics of how to make a game loop and such.