• Opinions on D? v2
    6 replies, posted
  • The D Programming Language, while maintaining the resilience and speed of C++, has better syntax, an automatic garbage collection option, among other features that literally make it a feasible replacement for C++ in the future. Why are people ignoring it? Why? [highlight](User was banned for this post ("if your thread was closed it doesn't mean "create it again"" - Gran PC))[/highlight]
  • oh my god just do some actual research yourself for once rather than making a new thread for every question you have
  • The main problem I've found is that despite having a featureful standard library, it's terribly documented and outside of the standard library you're hard pressed to find an external library that's being kept up to date. That's besides the fact that it's in limbo between 2 standards (D 1.0 and D 2.0) and there's no IDEs for it (besides crappy VS/Eclipse plugins that haven't been updated in years).
  • [QUOTE=calzoneman;36883791]The main problem I've found is that despite having a featureful standard library, it's terribly documented and outside of the standard library you're hard pressed to find an external library that's being kept up to date. That's besides the fact that it's in limbo between 2 standards (D 1.0 and D 2.0) and there's no IDEs for it (besides crappy VS/Eclipse plugins that haven't been updated in years).[/QUOTE] I agree. I would gladly use it if there was up to date IDE and up to date bindings for SFML and other libraries.
  • [QUOTE=calzoneman;36883791]The main problem I've found is that despite having a featureful standard library, it's terribly documented and outside of the standard library you're hard pressed to find an external library that's being kept up to date. That's besides the fact that it's in limbo between 2 standards (D 1.0 and D 2.0) and there's no IDEs for it (besides crappy VS/Eclipse plugins that haven't been updated in years).[/QUOTE] D1 is discontinued. It will cease to get bug fixes from the official repositories in December. VisualD (Visual Studio) is up to date, Mono-D (MonoDevelop) is too. There are others but these two are the best ones. Look for third-party libraries on Github instead of dsource.org, there are tons of up to date libraries for D2. [editline]23rd July 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=Simspelaaja;36887315]I agree. I would gladly use it if there was up to date IDE and up to date bindings for SFML and other libraries.[/QUOTE] [url=http://dsource.org/projects/visuald/]Visual Studio Plugin[/url] [url=https://github.com/aldacron/Derelict3]Various game-related bindings, including SFML2[/url] [editline]23rd July 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=Cockman;36883592]The D Programming Language, while maintaining the resilience and speed of C++, has better syntax, an automatic garbage collection option, among other features that literally make it a feasible replacement for C++ in the future. Why are people ignoring it? Why?[/QUOTE] For the most part it's an issue of implementation. The reference compiler, DMD, only supports the x86 architecture, meaning it's not usable for important platforms like ARM. It also doesn't have COFF support for Windows yet, which means you need to use OPTLINK, a terribly buggy, ancient linker, which in turn means there's no x86-64 support on Windows (yet). GDC (DMD front-end + GCC back-end) supports all targets that the GCC back-end supports, which includes stuff like ARM, but the runtime hasn't been fully ported to these platforms yet. There are people who use D for ARM with GDC, though, it's definitely possible even in its current state. LDC (DMD front-end + LLVM as back-end) is another compiler option, but LLVM doesn't support exceptions on Windows yet, making it virtually unusable for programming on Windows. For x86 though, there's no reason you can't use D for stuff like games development, and indeed people have been doing that for years. It wasn't until recently that the compilers were mature enough to be used for commercial projects, but there are a lot of game studios interested in D right now, and some of them are experimenting with it internally.
  • However I do not think any of the big graphics engines are ported to D yet. Like Ogre, Crystalspace or Irrlight. So If you want to do 3D you have to make your own engine. Now, suddenly, I want to use D :v: I will never get done with my project if I change whole the time... And making my own engine does not sound that fun.
  • [QUOTE=AlienCat;36897333]However I do not think any of the big graphics engines are ported to D yet. Like Ogre, Crystalspace or Irrlight. So If you want to do 3D you have to make your own engine.[/QUOTE] Yeah, there have been a couple of projects trying to port or bind Ogre, but the liberal use of multiple inheritance makes it diffcult. Obviously the biggest issue for ever switching from C++ is the fact that C++ interoperability is notoriously difficult - D probably has the best C++ interop out there yet it's still only useful for a select few scenarios. Luckily, you can get a long way with just C libraries and D wrappers of them.