• Electronics and Embedded Programming V3
    1,545 replies, posted
  • [QUOTE=Chryseus;34835158]I never get any candy ;-([/QUOTE] Well, you only get candy when you order in the bad evil nazi germany :v:
  • I really want to get into electronics however i'm really unsure where to start, i have a firm knowledge of some electronics such as logic gates, bistable latches, adders and lots of the simple things however i'd love to create these ideas in real life rather than things like Minecraft and logic simulators online. I'm also pretty well versed in programming C and C++. Any suggestions?
  • [QUOTE=Disarray;34834518]Hey all, at university we have been given a group design project which involves an Arduino. We have also been given a small kit of components but i am having trouble identifying what this is: [IMG]http://filesmelt.com/dl/abc4.png[/IMG] If anyone could help that would be great. Thanks.[/QUOTE] I find it funny that a friend of mine asked for help with using [B]THAT EXACT[/B] type of chip with a arduino to control some somewhat beefy relays.
  • [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mZ7pUADoo58[/media] Made me chuckle
  • [QUOTE=Bambo.;34835295]I really want to get into electronics however i'm really unsure where to start, i have a firm knowledge of some electronics such as logic gates, bistable latches, adders and lots of the simple things however i'd love to create these ideas in real life rather than things like Minecraft and logic simulators online. I'm also pretty well versed in programming C and C++. Any suggestions?[/QUOTE] First buy a breadboard, jumpers, multimeter and a good selection of components from somewhere reasonably priced. (I.E Bitsbox, RS, Farnell, Ebay, DealExtreme) Once you have that done you can start experimenting (blowing shit up) , don't forget to read every book or bit of information you can get your hands on, make sure you know Ohm's Law, Joule's Law and basic resistive circuits before doing anything or you'll be seeing lots of smoke. Lastly buy an Arduino so you can hop on the bandwagon.
  • [QUOTE=Chryseus;34835761]First buy a breadboard, jumpers, multimeter and a good selection of components from somewhere reasonably priced. (I.E Bitsbox, RS, Farnell, Ebay, DealExtreme) Once you have that done you can start experimenting (blowing shit up) , don't forget to read every book or bit of information you can get your hands on, make sure you know Ohm's Law, Joule's Law and basic resistive circuits before doing anything or you'll be seeing lots of smoke. Lastly buy an Arduino so you can hop on the bandwagon.[/QUOTE] I know those (and more) laws from school and i still see allot of smoke. I do admit that i am kinda clumsy. I am surprised that after all my accidents i still experiment. Today i got a screwdriver with full force in my thumb.. twice! Or my all time favorite, hitting the iron with my hands.
  • [img]http://i55.tinypic.com/11c5k45.png[/img] My first selfwound toroid coil ever. I think it looks pretty neat.
  • Found a [url=http://pdf1.alldatasheet.com/datasheet-pdf/view/157059/BURR-BROWN/ADC84KG-12.html]12-bit A/D converter chip[/url] that had been tossed because someone had cut all the gold leads off it. I added new leads. [IMG]http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a166/ballsandy/100_2534.jpg[/IMG] Not sure what I could use this for.
  • Having a peek at the FPGA's demo code for VGA output to see what I should be aiming for output-wise, going to have another crack at it once I've gotten some sleep. [img]http://imgkk.com/i/i79a.png[/img]
  • :dance: [img]http://imgkk.com/i/lp6d.jpg[/img] [code]module newvga(CLOCK_50, LEDG, VGA_CLK, VGA_HS, VGA_VS, VGA_BLANK, VGA_SYNC, VGA_R, VGA_G, VGA_B); input CLOCK_50; // 50MHz Clock output [8:0]LEDG; // indicators woo output VGA_CLK; // DACs latch on posedge output VGA_HS; // Horizontal Sync -----+ output VGA_VS; // Vertical Sync -------| Active Low output VGA_BLANK; // Blanking ------------+ output VGA_SYNC; // Unused output [9:0]VGA_R; // output [9:0]VGA_G; // Output DACs, 10 bit, 0-2047 output [9:0]VGA_B; // // Clock Setup reg [1:0]ClockDiv; reg Clock_25; always @(posedge CLOCK_50) begin ClockDiv = ClockDiv + 1; end assign Clock_25 = ClockDiv[0]; // 50MHz / 2 = 25MHz, close enough to the 25.175 MHz in the spec reg [10:0]Horiz_Count; reg [10:0]Vert_Count; reg Hsync; reg Vsync; reg [9:0]Red; reg [9:0]Green; reg [9:0]Blue; assign LEDG[0] = Clock_25; // These aren't all that useful, it's too fast to see the blinking. assign LEDG[1] = Hsync; // assign LEDG[2] = Vsync; // assign VGA_CLK = Clock_25; assign VGA_HS = !Hsync; // Chip inputs are active low, so invert them. assign VGA_VS = !Vsync; assign VGA_BLANK = !Hsync | !Vsync; // When we're doing sync, blank! assign VGA_SYNC = 1'b1; // Unused assign VGA_R = Red; assign VGA_G = Green; assign VGA_B = Blue; /* Timings! http://tinyvga.com/vga-timing/640x480@60Hz Horizontal: Visible 640 Front Porch 16 Sync 96 Back Porch 48 Total 800 Vertical: Visible 480 Front Porch 10 Sync 2 Back Porch 33 Total 525 */ always @(posedge VGA_CLK) begin if (Horiz_Count < 801) begin Horiz_Count = Horiz_Count + 1; if (Horiz_Count == 17) begin Hsync = 1; end if (Horiz_Count == 112) begin Hsync = 0; end end else begin Horiz_Count = 0; if (Vert_Count < 526) begin Vert_Count = Vert_Count + 1; Green = Vert_Count; if (Vert_Count == 11) begin Vsync = 1; end if (Vert_Count == 13) begin Vsync = 0; end end else begin Vert_Count = 0; end end if (Horiz_Count[6] == 1) begin Red = 10'b1111111111; end else begin Red = 10'b0000000000; end if (Horiz_Count[7] == 1) begin Green = 10'b1111111111; end else begin Green = 10'b0000000000; end if (Horiz_Count[8] == 1) begin Blue = 10'b1111111111; end else begin Blue = 10'b0000000000; end end endmodule[/code]
  • I finally understand half of the shit I didnt, thanks to this: [url]http://www.falstad.com/circuit/[/url] Though i'd post it since its pretty in-depth
  • [QUOTE=ruarai;34860138]I finally understand half of the shit I didnt, thanks to this: [url]http://www.falstad.com/circuit/[/url] Though i'd post it since its pretty in-depth[/QUOTE] Just don't expect it to be too accurate, like all simulators the real circuits tend to behave rather differently, even worse java circuit sim does not support proper device models. It's fine for simple circuits where your trying to gain an understanding of how they work but you should not rely on it.
  • They're idealized models, i.e. perfect components. Real components usually behave very differently, i.e unidealized.
  • [QUOTE=DrLuke;34861236]They're idealized models, i.e. perfect components. Real components usually behave very differently, i.e unidealized.[/QUOTE] Say that to the mosfet model, Chryseus and I use analog switches instead.
  • [QUOTE=DrLuke;34835118]I ordered wire and got a bag of candy. Well, the slow shipping shall be forgiven. [t]http://i51.tinypic.com/2v9yoti.png[/t][/QUOTE] Even gummy bears sound oppressive in German.
  • [QUOTE=SubbyV-2;34861570]Say that to the mosfet model, Chryseus and I use analog switches instead.[/QUOTE] Well, the resistance wouldn't be that different.
  • [QUOTE=Val67;34862210]Does anyone know how the AVRs compare to the MSP430?[/QUOTE] AVRs can be faster, MSP430s consume way less power
  • [QUOTE=DrLuke;34861651]Well, the resistance wouldn't be that different.[/QUOTE] You can change it on analog switches
  • Resistor Networks piss me off to no end. It's not hard to describe how they work. A simple diagram as seen in any datasheet is helpful. [img]http://www.interfacebus.com/resistor-network-16-pin-dip-parallel-schematic.jpg[/img] However the world is not perfect and I'm stuck trying to read shit like this: [IMG]http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a166/ballsandy/netwerkz.jpg[/IMG] I'm having an incredible amount of trouble understanding what the fuck they are trying to show me here other than it's a resistor network DIP and only a few pins are actually numbered.
  • Seems like it's a couple of voltage dividers to bias some input signal.
  • [QUOTE=MIPS;34899741]I'm having an incredible amount of trouble understanding what the fuck they are trying to show me here other than it's a resistor network DIP and only a few pins are actually numbered.[/QUOTE] Looks like they're trying to bias to ~3V.
  • [QUOTE=ROBO_DONUT;34901981]Looks like they're trying to bias to ~3V.[/QUOTE] That is indeed what it's trying to do because the disk drives I have use a 3V signalling rate. Problem is that aside from pin 8 being ground I can't really determine what the other pins are doing.
  • Pin 6 seems to be +5V, pins 1-7 and 9 being the outputs with a not-gate on pin 9 and another one on pin 1 as an extra output.
  • The resistors are just being used as 3V pull ups. That schematic is relatively simple compared to some I've seen.
  • [QUOTE=DrLuke;34907299]Pin 6 seems to be +5V, pins 1-7 and 9 being the outputs with a not-gate on pin 9 and another one on pin 1 as an extra output.[/QUOTE] Pin 6 however is noted twice. Once for +5V, the other time for a pin that goes to another chip which which does NOT want that +5v. Pins 10-16 are still missing and a DMM says that they are active. I really need the datasheet for this thing. Can anyone get better search results for a 1311003(-01?) 16 pin DIP resistor network? Google says people know of it but they don't offer a datasheet and the part number on the schematic only gives me the DEC part number and I lack the microfiche with the part tables on it.
  • Cool, the Raspberry Pi is out, but the first batch is already sold out. You can order them on RS and Farnell, but Farnell has been effectively DDOS'd and RS seems to only sell to companies.
  • Ordered 100 RGB LEDs for about $8, got them tomorrow. I noticed that it has only 2 pins. Oh well, it must be using specific voltages for specific colours, I thought. I was wrong. I put it in a circuit, and I have noticed it scrolls through the colours. I thought it must be PWM or something. Then, leaving it on for a minute I noticed something. It did blink patterns, just like some christmas light would do, then I noticed there is SMD stuff inside. My fear that I threw $8 out of the window was right. These are fucking christmas lights.