• E3: Could VR bring back the games arcade?
    43 replies, posted
[url]http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-36560030[/url]
We tried Arcade VR in the 90's. [img]http://www.arcade-museum.com/images/128/1286740641.jpg[/img] Nobody was willing to pay $5+ per game. The Arcade business model has not worked in North America for 16 years. You should be looking at the Japanese arcade model as it seems to still be rather profitable.
[QUOTE=pentium;50539348]We tried Arcade VR in the 90's. [img]http://www.arcade-museum.com/images/128/1286740641.jpg[/img] Nobody was willing to pay $5+ per game. The Arcade business model has not worked in North America for 16 years. You should be looking at the Japanese arcade model as it seems to still be rather profitable.[/QUOTE] to be fair, VR is far better off than it was back then, so I could see it working for events like E3 or game museums and popular areas, but arcades like they used to with VR probably wouldn't pay off very well VR back then was insanely primitive compared to today, that's for sure
Considering the hype behind it and the cost point for buying one for one's self, it could precisely work for the same reason why Arcades [I]did[/I] work at one point in time. They could work because of the appeal, and could continue working until the units and hardware prices decline.
[QUOTE=pentium;50539348]We tried Arcade VR in the 90's. [img]http://www.arcade-museum.com/images/128/1286740641.jpg[/img] Nobody was willing to pay $5+ per game. The Arcade business model has not worked in North America for 16 years. You should be looking at the Japanese arcade model as it seems to still be rather profitable.[/QUOTE] ...there are arcades all over the place, and near you?? Plus, comparing 90s VR to the brand new VR stuff that's coming out right now is beyond ridiculous :v:
[video=youtube;eg8Bh5iI2WY]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eg8Bh5iI2WY[/video] That was 5 years ago, give it the tech advancment we have today and polish it up and yeah i can see people going to venues where you hop into a 'pod' and play a game like this. For the right price of course.
[QUOTE=J!NX;50539356]to be fair, VR is far better off than it was back then, so I could see it working for events like E3 or game museums and popular areas, but arcades like they used to with VR probably wouldn't pay off very well VR back then was insanely primitive compared to today, that's for sure[/QUOTE] Hardware doesn't mean shit when one play costs a ton of money. No remaining arcade is going to justify leasing a machine or two when it takes up a ton of space.
[QUOTE=pentium;50539348]We tried Arcade VR in the 90's. [img]http://www.arcade-museum.com/images/128/1286740641.jpg[/img] Nobody was willing to pay $5+ per game. The Arcade business model has not worked in North America for 16 years. You should be looking at the Japanese arcade model as it seems to still be rather profitable.[/QUOTE] yeah let's ignore the major strides we've made in vr technology for the past two decades right?
[QUOTE=Limed00d;50539639]yeah let's ignore the major strides we've made in vr technology for the past two decades right?[/QUOTE] Alright then, you go do it. I'm sure if you ran an arcade you'd see a full return on one machine after 6 months. Also, I seem to recall that VR was thrown under the rug at a gaming standpoint for a good 15 years or so. Commercial applications, sure those were being constantly developed and innovated but nobody in gaming wanted to touch VR until Oculus began proposing their little project. Arcade gaming is not the same as either PC gaming or even console gaming. Don't try and assume marketing works the same because vendors are selling to the arcades themselves who often invest a few grand per machine, not end-user customers like you and me where at best it's $1000 per unit in large quantities.
[QUOTE=pentium;50539658]Alright then, you go do it. I'm sure if you ran an arcade you'd see a full return on one machine after 6 months. Also, I seem to recall that VR was thrown under the rug at a gaming standpoint for a good 15 years or so. Commercial applications, sure those were being constantly developed and innovated but nobody in gaming wanted to touch VR until Oculus began proposing their little project. Arcade gaming is not the same as either PC gaming or even console gaming. Don't try and assume marketing works the same because vendors are selling to the arcades themselves who often invest a few grand per machine, not end-user customers like you and me where at best it's $1000 per unit in large quantities.[/QUOTE] Man, your posts just within this thread have covered the full spectrum of worst ways to make a judgement ever. You've covered the inaccurate assessment of the technology ("let's judge VR based on where it was 2 decades ago"), to inaccurate assessment of price/value (vr is somehow too expensive even though many arcade cabinets are very expensive and you can get a vive for $800 + a sub $1000 pc), to just plain childish ("yeah well then you do it!"). I don't get what your issue with VR is but your posts in this thread have been ridiculous.
There's actually an arcade here on our nearby mall that has an Oculus Rift seat set that you can play for 30 minutes or one hour for approximately PHP 100-150 ($3-5 in USD). It has only like three games on it but it's pretty popular, I can definitely see it being something more common in the near future. [img]https://files.catbox.moe/rkzmlc.jpg[/img] [img]https://files.catbox.moe/shy98o.jpg[/img] [img]https://files.catbox.moe/m8p98u.jpg[/img]
I doubt arcades in the classic sense because even if VR headsets are expensive they're nowhere as expensive as cabinets used to be back in the day My money is on large scale experiences, think laser tag but with VR headsets. The kind of games you just wouldn't have the room to play at home Still quite a long way from that anyway
[QUOTE=Ryo Ohki;50539722]I doubt arcades in the classic sense because even if VR headsets are expensive they're nowhere as expensive as cabinets used to be back in the day My money is on large scale experiences, think laser tag but with VR headsets. The kind of games you just wouldn't have the room to play at home Still quite a long way from that anyway[/QUOTE] There is already many places looking to open large scale experiences, how far away we are just depends on technical challenges like maintaining battery life for the duration of the experience and tracking within an entire building. [thumb]http://www.roadtovr.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/theVOID.jpg[/thumb] (source:the void, planning to open this summer])
[QUOTE=Elspin;50539697]Man, your posts just within this thread have covered the full spectrum of worst ways to make a judgement ever. You've covered the inaccurate assessment of the technology ("let's judge VR based on where it was 2 decades ago"), to inaccurate assessment of price/value (vr is somehow too expensive even though many arcade cabinets are very expensive and you can get a vive for $800 + a sub $1000 pc), to just plain childish ("yeah well then you do it!"). I don't get what your issue with VR is but your posts in this thread have been ridiculous.[/QUOTE] Until I see proper VR killer apps that aren't existing PC games with a patch or two it remains a gimmick. An overpriced, next-gen gimmick sold purely on technology and promises but absolutely NOTHING based on it exclusively that it can call its own. Until that killer app shows up nobody is going to throw all their eggs in one basket because if the hype boils off again because nobody comes up for said killer app, you're fucked.
VR is still obscure to the general public, and you don't see the average Joe with a VR kit. This means that there's a financial opportunity in it obviously. What I don't see happening soon are those larger "walking"-type VR's, as they cost a fortune for the initial price and aren't meant to handle beatings from heavy use in conditions such as the thingy that NachoPiggy posted above. Give it time.
[QUOTE=pentium;50539767]Until I see proper VR killer apps that aren't existing PC games with a patch or two it remains a gimmick. An overpriced, next-gen gimmick sold purely on technology and promises but absolutely NOTHING based on it exclusively that it can call its own. Until that killer app shows up nobody is going to throw all their eggs in one basket because if the hype boils off again because nobody comes up for said killer app, you're fucked.[/QUOTE] I'd come up with a funny, witty zinger reply honestly anyone who follows VR already knows that this is total bullshit anyone who actually has followed VR would know that you're an idiot and that you don't know the difference between 20 years from now, and today. Only way anyone will convince you that yes, shit actually HAS improved, is if they had you play in VR. also, I have played in VR, and those killer apps that aren't gimmicks already exist. I don't see why they have to be 'not previously existing'. Only a few months ago did people actually manage to get full HMD's so what do you expect dude.
[QUOTE=J!NX;50539805] Anyone who actually has followed VR would know that you're an idiot and that you don't know the difference between 20 years from now, and today.[/QUOTE] So in five years from now I shouldn't still see VR fumbling along with a bunch of PC ports. It will have a massive development and user base and the price will of dropped down to $300-$500 per unit. [quote]I'd come up with a funny, witty zinger reply but it's not that worth it[/quote] I barely listen to you anyways, considering how much you and the clique shit on me so much, however lets not make this any more personal.
[QUOTE=Ryo Ohki;50539722]I doubt arcades in the classic sense because even if VR headsets are expensive they're nowhere as expensive as cabinets used to be back in the day My money is on large scale experiences, think laser tag but with VR headsets. The kind of games you just wouldn't have the room to play at home Still quite a long way from that anyway[/QUOTE] Motion simulators seem somewhat more appealing in combination with a VR headset, and that's also unlikely to become accessible to consumers.
[QUOTE=pentium;50539767]Until I see proper VR killer apps that aren't existing PC games with a patch or two it remains a gimmick. An overpriced, next-gen gimmick sold purely on technology and promises but absolutely NOTHING based on it exclusively that it can call its own. Until that killer app shows up nobody is going to throw all their eggs in one basket because if the hype boils off again because nobody comes up for said killer app, you're fucked.[/QUOTE] [media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZnZrcvvyZM[/media] (this one is out) [media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EtQh2keQbY[/media] (this one is out) [media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8TmMIGOevis[/media] (this one is purchasable and playable, not sure if it's still considered a beta) [media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FhSsdsu4yIk[/media] (this one is out) [media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVCNUZv-5TU[/media] (this one is out) [media]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYjYEgo_rkI[/media] (this one is coming out soon) I have no idea what cave you've been living in but VR left the "all games are just headtracking poorly injected into bethesda games" a long ass time ago. I guess it's also worth adding that several of these games would work well in an arcade.
[QUOTE=Elspin;50539845] -bunch of videos to reinforce his statement- I guess it's also worth adding that several of these games would work well in an arcade.[/QUOTE] Fair enough I wasn't expecting that. Now show me the games which currently are doing the rounds in the VR-ready arcades.
[QUOTE=pentium;50539869]Fair enough I wasn't expecting that. Now show me the games which currently are doing the rounds in the VR-ready arcades.[/QUOTE] The headsets literally just released months ago to the public, so of course there's not many out in Arcades yet. But in Canada, we already have a few places. CTRL-V is already open in waterloo, ontario for example: [url]http://www.ctrlv.ca/[/url]
[QUOTE=pentium;50539836]So in five years from now I shouldn't still see VR fumbling along with a bunch of PC ports. It will have a massive development and user base and the price will of dropped down to $300-$500 per unit. [/QUOTE] Exactly right Wireless phones transcended the home into peoples pockets, and then they become mobile laptops but without a keyboard. 4k monitors went from a few thousand dollars to something a retail employee can afford. Laptops are becoming more like desktops by the hour. Cars are becoming so smart they can drive themselves. [URL="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dU-JguZmB7g"]Tech improves quickly.[/URL] [QUOTE=pentium;50539836] I barely listen to you anyways, considering how much you and the clique shit on me so much.[/QUOTE] If you think that's the case then hey, I can't blame you. Iv'e learned to love what you do with tech, it's insanely cool and you're pretty much a tech historian and that's important to have. A lot of old tech can still be applied today if improved and refitted properly. But face it, when it comes to computer tech stuff that existed back then literally doesn't compare to todays VR changed the most since then. We didn't have 1:1 finger, room, and head tracking. We didn't have trackpads that could emulate a trackball perfectly. Nor did we have touch technology or screens that are as good as they are now. All of that tech existed yeah, and it was impressive shit, but it's a way different platform. Everything is becoming wireless and so fast that the human brain can't even process it quick enough. VR arcades are only an inevitability really. Once wireless headsets hit the market I know we'll be seeing multiplayer arcades that's for sure.
[QUOTE=pentium;50539869]Fair enough I wasn't expecting that. Now show me the games which currently are doing the rounds in the VR-ready arcades.[/QUOTE] what this entire discussion is about how VR arcades dont exist yet, but could. how the fuck is he supposed to show you "games making the rounds in VR-ready arcades" when the arcades havent been set up
[QUOTE=pentium;50539869]Fair enough I wasn't expecting that. Now show me the games which currently are doing the rounds in the VR-ready arcades.[/QUOTE] just stop, lol
[QUOTE=Timebomb575;50539910]what this entire discussion is about how VR arcades dont exist yet, but could. how the fuck is he supposed to show you "games making the rounds in VR-ready arcades" when the arcades havent been set up[/QUOTE] The argument ballooned out because I said it wwouldn't work and people cited me from previous arguments where I compared old tech to new tech, then it derailed further from there. The whole point of the article was "Will VR mark the rebirth of the arcade?" My answer is "no".
I'd give it a fewish years for VR arcades to be decent and really pick up I don't know, feels too early
I'd pay 5-10 bucks for a chance to play some vr games for 30ish minutes. I think vr arcades could be really popular amongst people like me who can't afford a headset.
[QUOTE=Pythagoras64;50547001]I'd pay 5-10 bucks for a chance to play some vr games for 30ish minutes. I think vr arcades could be really popular amongst people like me who can't afford a headset.[/QUOTE] i'm so for this. thought about this as soon as i saw those battlefield vr tech demos with the gun and the track pad and waist-holder. if this can be an affordable, profitable replacement for laser tag, it might be a thing. otherwise VR doesn't seem to be affordable for the money or space spent in a home. training? magic robot vr surgery? i'm all for that. video games? arcades at best.
The Japanese still have video arcades without the help of virtual reality. How come we're slugging behind when arcades used to be our forte? Granted MESS exists but that's a different story.
[QUOTE=FunnyStarRunner;50547226]The Japanese still have video arcades without the help of virtual reality. How come we're slugging behind when arcades used to be our forte? Granted MESS exists but that's a different story.[/QUOTE] I feel like arcades stayed a thing in Japan due to tight living space restrictions.
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