• Iran sentences US man to death for spying, condemned by USA.
    89 replies, posted
[release][img]http://msnbcmedia3.msn.com/j/MSNBC/Components/Photo/_new/120109_hekmati.grid-6x2.jpg[/img] [B]A grab taken from a video aired by the official Iranian state TV on December 18 shows a young man alleged to be a captured CIA spy confessing to a "mission" to infiltrate the intelligence ministry. State TV named the man as Amir Mirza Hekmati.[/B] Iran's Revolutionary Court sentenced an American to death for spying for the CIA, the semi-official Fars news agency reported on Monday. "Amir Mirza Hekmati was sentenced to death ... for cooperating with the hostile country (the United States) and spying for the CIA," Fars said, without giving a source. "The court found him Corrupt on Earth and Mohareb (waging war on God)," it added. Last week, Hekmati's family said he was not getting adequate legal representation. In a statement, they said that his "only advocate in Iran is a government-appointed lawyer who he first met on the day of his trial." "We have struggled to provide Amir with an attorney in Iran," the family wrote in the statement. "We have sought to hire at least 10 different attorneys in Tehran to no avail." Hekmati's family said the former U.S. military translator was visiting his grandmothers. Iranian prosecutors say Hekmati was working for the CIA and could face the death penalty if convicted. Hekmati, 28, was born in Arizona and graduated from a Michigan high school. His father Ali is a professor at a community college in Flint, Michigan. The State Department has called for Hekmati's release, and spokesman Victoria Nuland told reporters in Washington last week that the department continues to wait for Iranian authorities to grant Swiss diplomats access to him in prison. The Swiss government represents U.S. interests in Iran because the two countries don't have diplomatic relations. Nuland said Hekmati is a dual U.S.-Iranian national, and "the Iranian government has historically not recognized our rights to access. " "That doesn't change the fact that we will keep asking for it," she said. Iran charges that as a U.S. Marine, Hekmati received special training and served at U.S. military bases in Iraq and Afghanistan before heading to Iran for his alleged intelligence mission. [B] 'Deceived'[/B] Last month, Fars reported that the prosecution had applied for capital punishment because the suspect "admitted that he received training in the United States and planned to imply that Iran was involved in terrorist activities in foreign countries" after returning to the U.S. That report said [url=http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45716418/ns/world_news-mideast_n_africa/t/iran-tv-shows-suspected-us-spy-confessing/]Hekmati repeated a confession broadcast on state TV Dec. 18.[/url] Hekmati's lawyer, who was identified only by his surname, Samadi, denied the charges, according to the December report. In court on Dec. 27, Hekmati was quoted by Fars as saying, "I was deceived by the CIA." "Although I was appointed to break into Iran's intelligence systems and act as a new source for the CIA, I had no intention of undermining the country," Fars quoted Hekmati as saying. Current and former U.S. government officials told Reuters in November that Iran had succeeded in uncovering the identities of several CIA informants. [/release] Source: [url=http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/45923397/ns/world_news-mideast_n_africa/#.TwqjLfL4LcA]MSNBC[/url] [QUOTE=Laferio;34137186][quote]"The State Department said Monday that it was working to confirm Iranian state media reports that an Iran revolutionary court had sentenced an American citizen and former U.S. Marine Amir Mirzaei Hekmati to death on charges of spying for the CIA. "If true, we strongly condemn this verdict," State Department spokeswoman Victoria Nuland said in a press statement Monday. "Allegations that Hekmati either worked for, or was sent to Iran by the CIA, are simply untrue." Hekmati "has 20 days to appeal the court's decision," the Washington Post's Thomas Erdbrink reported from Tehran. Hekmati, 28, a former U.S. Marine Arabic language translator in Iraq, was born in Flagstaff, Arizona of Iranian descent and raised in Michigan. His family in Michigan, former colleagues and American officials say Hekmati never served in the CIA and was in Iran to visit his grandmother. Hekmati's parents said they "are shocked and terrified" by the news, his mother Behnaz Hekmati wrote at the website the family set up to advocate for Amir's release, FreeAmir. "We believe that this verdict is the result of a process that was neither transparent nor fair." Amir Hekmati on vacation in Colombia in 2010. (Courtesy of Hekmati family/Yahoo News) "Amir did not engage in any acts of spying, or 'fighting against God,' as the convicting Judge has claimed in his sentence," his mother's press statement continues. "A grave error has been committed, and we have authorized our legal representatives to make direct contact with the Iranian authorities to find a solution to this misunderstanding." Hekmati had the permission of the Iranian interests section--the U.S.-based diplomatic outpost for the Islamic republic--in Washington D.C. to travel to Iran in August to visit his elderly grandmother, his family has told Yahoo News. After his arrest on August 29, Iranian officials initially urged the family to keep quiet in order to facilitate his release. But in December, Iranian state media aired video of Hekmati allegedly confessing to having worked as a CIA agent--charges his family and friends vehemently deny and which they said appear to have been given under duress. Hekmati joined the Marines in 2001 after graduating from high school. He was posted to Iraq after attending language school in Monterey, Calif. He left the Marines in 2005, and later worked for various companies, including based in Kansas for the government contractor BAE Systems from March until September 2010, Yahoo News previously reported. Former U.S. Marine Jared Bystrom told Yahoo News Tuesday that Hekmati called him last year to propose launching a business together. Bystrom and Hekmati had been posted by the Marines to the defense language school in Monterey, California in 2001, where Hekmati studied Arabic. Another friend and former colleague of Hekmati's, Chase Winter, told Yahoo News last month that Hekmati had told him he was thinking of going back to school to get a business degree. Hekmati visited Winter in South America last September 2010 for a week's vacation, Winter said. Hekmati's Facebook page until shortly after his Iran TV video "confession" last month featured photos of himself in various locales he had traveled and worked--hardly demonstrating the behavior of someone trying to conceal his activities, his associates note. American officials again called Monday for the Iran government to give Swiss diplomats consular access to Hekmati, to allow him to meet with a lawyer, and to release him "without delay." "Securing the freedom and safety of this young man is the top concern of the U.S. government in this case," a U.S. official who requested anonymity said Monday. "Unfortunately, the Iranian government is not doing the right thing here. They have a track record of falsely accusing individuals of espionage for leverage." International human rights groups also called on Iran to reverse the sentence, and raised concerns about the apparent lack of due process Hekmati was granted. Hekmati is the first American to be sentenced to death in Iran since the 1979 Iranian revolution, Amnesty International said. "Like many other detainees in Iran, Amir Hekmati did not receive a fair trial and we question the timing and political circumstances of this decision," said Ann Harrison, Amnesty International's interim director for the Middle East and North Africa. "We know from past experience that the Iranian authorities sometimes rush forward with executions of political prisoners — including dual nationals — at politically sensitive times and we fear that this execution could happen within days or weeks." "We are seriously concerned regarding the death sentence, secrecy, and continued lack of transparency surrounding the prosecution of Iranian-American citizen Amir Hekmati," the International Campaign for Human Rights in Iran's Hadi Ghaemi said in a press release Monday. "We ask the Iranian judiciary to adhere to international standards of due process and allow independent observers in the courtroom at his appeals trial."."[/quote] [url]http://news.yahoo.com/blogs/envoy/iran-sentences-former-u-marine-death-151159772.html[/url] [img]http://l.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/Dm7rsmDUFPCqRHI.VsCA7Q--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7cT04NTt3PTMxMA--/http://media.zenfs.com/en/blogs/theenvoy/AmirHekmatiColombiaSept2010Press_photo.png[/img][/img][/QUOTE]
If he's American, he probably isn't the one doing the spying.
Iran, if you don't want the U.S. kicking in your front door, this is the wrong way to go about preventing it.
Let's not forget this part when pondering if he is genuine or not: [release]Current and former U.S. government officials told Reuters in November that Iran had succeeded in uncovering the identities of several CIA informants. [/release] [editline]9th January 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=Doctor Zedacon;34125687]Iran, if you don't want the U.S. kicking in your front door, this is the wrong way to go about preventing it.[/QUOTE] "U.S., if you don't want Iran kicking in your front door, this is the wrong way to go about preventing it" Sending spies is provocative, convicting them is not. Iran is not in the wrong here (bar death penalty), the U.S. is.
He admitted to spying, you take risks knowing whats going to happen when you spy in a enemy nation.
No one deserves the death penalty, not even spies. Two wrongs don't make a right. [editline]9th January 2012[/editline] Okay maybe Hitler but he doesn't count
[QUOTE=Dr. Punchgroin;34125854]No one deserves the death penalty, not even spies. Two wrongs don't make a right. [editline]9th January 2012[/editline] Okay maybe Hitler but he doesn't count[/QUOTE] Oh sweet, a complete contradiction of the original point, all in one post. Must come to you real easy. You ever lose sleep?
Death penalty seems a bit to harsh, I favour that fail of a spy being sent to prison for life better so he could suffer more, but at least if his in prison he has chance to get release if relations improve between the 2 countries.
Against the death penalty.
[QUOTE=Mingebox;34125670]If he's American, he probably isn't the one doing the spying.[/QUOTE] how is what are you what are you talking about did you even read the article
Dat American is spah! But really, this can not end well, at all.
[QUOTE=Starpluck;34125707]Let's not forget this part when pondering if he is genuine or not: [release]Current and former U.S. government officials told Reuters in November that Iran had succeeded in uncovering the identities of several CIA informants. [/release] [editline]9th January 2012[/editline] "U.S., if you don't want Iran kicking in your front door, this is the wrong way to go about preventing it" Sending spies is provocative, convicting them is not. Iran is not in the wrong here (bar death penalty), the U.S. is.[/QUOTE] You know everyone has spies right?
[QUOTE=Starpluck;34125707]Let's not forget this part when pondering if he is genuine or not: [release]Current and former U.S. government officials told Reuters in November that Iran had succeeded in uncovering the identities of several CIA informants. [/release] [editline]9th January 2012[/editline] "U.S., if you don't want Iran kicking in your front door, this is the wrong way to go about preventing it" Sending spies is provocative, convicting them is not. Iran is not in the wrong here (bar death penalty), the U.S. is.[/QUOTE] So you're saying since they detained him and proved that he's a spy, this gives them the right to kill him.
[QUOTE=lukepker;34126094]So you're saying since they detained him and proved that he's a spy, this gives them the right to kill him.[/QUOTE] Nice reading skills bro. [QUOTE=Starpluck;34125707]Let's not forget this part when pondering if he is genuine or not: [release]Current and former U.S. government officials told Reuters in November that Iran had succeeded in uncovering the identities of several CIA informants. [/release] [editline]9th January 2012[/editline] "U.S., if you don't want Iran kicking in your front door, this is the wrong way to go about preventing it" Sending spies is provocative, convicting them is not. Iran is not in the wrong here ([highlight]bar death penalty[/highlight]), the U.S. is.[/QUOTE]
Thing is though, im honestly wondering if its a spy or not. Both the US and Iran have at it lately.
Obviously a really bad spy if he got caught.
[QUOTE=Jetblack357;34126144]Thing is though, im honestly wondering if its a spy or not. Both the US and Iran have at it lately.[/QUOTE] Nope, it's just a random civilian, because Iran really needs the extra tension. Amazing.
When forming an opinion on these matters, I always think to myself what would happen if the situation was turned around the other way. The one thing I'd say is commentable about this, is that I believe the death penalty has no place in modern society.
death penalty for spying? that sounds like something that would only fly in the cold war era
[QUOTE=Starpluck;34125707]"U.S., if you don't want Iran kicking in your front door, this is the wrong way to go about preventing it"[/QUOTE]This might be true if Iran had any potential for directly attacking the U.S. at this stage, let alone overwhelming it, but they don't. Iran has everything to lose from a conflict with the U.S., not the other way around.
[QUOTE=Contag;34125889]Against the death penalty.[/QUOTE] Doesn't make any difference when it comes down to humans doing petty crimes.
[QUOTE=Bat-shit;34126456]Doesn't make any difference when it comes down to humans doing petty crimes.[/QUOTE] Petty crimes isnt being a enemy soldier in enemy territory.
I think he's guilty. Whilst the death penalty may seem harsh, it's no different to what most countries would do with uncovered enemy intelligence agents/saboteurs. The US sending him to Iran is a provocative move, them executing him is understandable and justified with regards to the laws of their country (although certain people may not agree with the death penalty).
Say what you will, but treason and espionage are also a capital offence in the United States.
[QUOTE=Bat-shit;34126456]Doesn't make any difference when it comes down to humans doing petty crimes.[/QUOTE] Petty crimes? You'd shoot an enemy in war, and treason carries a death penalty in the US He was an Iranian citizen too
[QUOTE=Contag;34126736]Petty crimes? You'd shoot an enemy in war, and treason carries a death penalty in the US He was an Iranian citizen too[/QUOTE] Well you just said "Against the death penalty." so I thought you were talking in general.. to which I said it wouldn't even matter because humans would still do crimes that send them away for life anyway, be it treason or spying I don't fucking know.
[QUOTE=Doctor Zedacon;34125687]Iran, if you don't want the U.S. kicking in your front door, this is the wrong way to go about preventing it.[/QUOTE] Yeah, instead let them keep sneaking into your backdoor.
[QUOTE=Starpluck;34125707] Sending spies is provocative, convicting them is not. Iran is not in the wrong here (bar death penalty), the U.S. is.[/QUOTE] Irregardless of whether Iran's actions were right or wrong, Doctor's point still holds true
So I guess shooting at the enemy in a war is also bad?
[QUOTE=belgiumtoast;34127016]So I guess shooting at the enemy in a war is also bad?[/QUOTE] Well, it depends on the options available. If there were a choice to avoid opponents dying that was not taken, that's not particularly cool with me. If it were the only option (as in, the [I]only[/I] option rather than someone saying "we can only really shoot this dude"), then I regret the loss of life, but am aware that at least one person is still alive.
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