• Scientists Confirm that Plants Talk and Listen To Each Other, Communication Crucial for Survival
    105 replies, posted
[quote=Medical Daily]When a South African botanist Lyall Watson claimed in 1973 that plants had emotions that could be recorded on a lie detector test, he was dismissed by many in the scientific community. However, new research, published in the journal Trends in Plant Science, has revealed that plants not only respond to sound, but they also communicate to each other by making "clicking" sounds. [img]http://images.medicaldaily.com/datainfo/images/2012/6/4220rtr2ogii.jpg[/img] [I]Photo: Luke MacGregor/Reuters[/I] [sub]New research has revealed that plants not only respond to sound, but they also communicate to each other by making "clicking" sounds.[/sub] Using powerful loudspeakers, researchers at The University of Western Australia were able to hear clicking sounds coming from the roots of corn saplings. Researchers at Bristol University also found that when they suspended the young roots in water and played a continuous noise at 220Hz, a similar frequency to the plant clicks, they found that the plants grew towards the source of the sound. "Everyone knows that plants react to light, and scientists also know that plants use volatile chemicals to communicate with each other, for instance, when danger - such as a herbivore - approaches," Dr. Gagliano said in a university news release. "I was working one day in my herb garden and started to wonder if maybe plants were also sensitive to sounds - why not? - so I decided as a scientist to find out." While it has been long known that plants grow towards light, previous research from Exeter University found cabbage plants emitted methyl jasmonate gas when their surfaces are cut or pierced to warn its neighbors of danger such as caterpillars or garden shears. Researchers from the earlier study also found that the when the volatile gas was emitted, the nearly cabbage plants appeared to receive the urgent message that and protected themselves by producing toxic chemicals on their leaves to fend off predators like caterpillars. However, new research, published in the journal Trends in Plant Science, has revealed that plants not only respond to sound, but they also communicate to each other by making "clicking" sounds. Scientists suspect that sound and vibration may play an essential role in the survival of plants by giving them information about the environment around them. Researchers said sounds waves are easily transmissible through soil, and could be used to pick up threats like drought from their neighbors further away. Gagliano said that the latest findings shows that the role of sound in plants has yet to be fully explored, "leaving serious gaps our current understanding of the sensory and communicatory complexity of these organisms". In addition to other forms of sensory response, "it is very likely that some form of sensitivity to sound and vibrations also plays an important role in the life of plants," she added.[/quote] [url=http://www.medicaldaily.com/news/20120611/10247/plants-communication-survival.htm]Medical Daily[/url] Holy shit
So, in vegetable gardens the plants are going "SHITSHITSHITSHITSHITHELPMESHITSHITSHIT!"
Take that vegetarians
[QUOTE=RagerTrader;36348930]So, in vegetable gardens the plants are going "SHITSHITSHITSHITSHITHELPMESHITSHITSHIT!"[/QUOTE] FUCK MAN, THEY GOT JIM.
Nice to know
Reminds of a story about this one guy that yeps hearing screaming, but turns out it was plants.
So now every time I mow now, I will be thinking of plants and flowers screaming in pure terror before I rip them to shreds, thanks.
i'm a murderer
[QUOTE=SpaceGhost;36348990]So now every time I mow now, I will be thinking of plants and flowers screaming in pure terror before I rip them to shreds, thanks.[/QUOTE] [url=http://io9.com/5623112/the-smell-of-freshly+cut-grass-is-actually-a-plant-distress-call]Fun fact-- the smell of freshly cut grass is actually a distress call they let out.[/url] Am I making you happy
[QUOTE=ewitwins;36348976]FUCK MAN, THEY GOT JIM.[/QUOTE] [img]http://ed_edd_eddy5.tripod.com/jim.jpg[/img]
[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Happening_(2008_film)]Reminds me of a M Night Shyamalan movie...[/url]
[MEDIA]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxNuAoPW30U[/MEDIA]
I'm pretty sure this is basic communication, nothing remotely like a full-blown language. That title is pretty-misleading
[QUOTE=GameDev;36349013][url=http://io9.com/5623112/the-smell-of-freshly+cut-grass-is-actually-a-plant-distress-call]Fun fact-- the smell of freshly cut grass is actually a distress call they let out.[/url] Am I making you happy[/QUOTE] Not particularly.
Vegetarians can't be so self-righteous now, can they? HEAR THE LETTUICE SCREAM, YOU MURDERERS. HOW DOES IT FEEL TO SLAUGHTER THOUSANDS OF INNOCENT CARROTS???
So that explains why store-bought, high-volume lettuce has that terrible taste. The plants tell the other plants to watch out and they react by pushing out shitty-tasting chemicals. Interesting.
Now the only things PETA members can eat are dirt and rocks.
I wonder if this means that vegan-ism will stop, or if vegans will just starve.
[QUOTE=Emperor Scorpious II;36349019][url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Happening_(2008_film)]Reminds me of a M Night Shyamalan movie...[/url][/QUOTE] First thing I thought of. [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhmEo-46vUQ[/media] (jesus christ why is this video so quiet) (and why is it the only one I can find) [QUOTE=legolover122;36349210]Now the only things PETA members can eat are dirt and rocks.[/QUOTE] Yep. Well, until we learn that earthquakes are actually caused by rock sex.
I grow carnivorous plants as a hobby. I can hear them gossiping about me right now. Damn plants.
[quote] Using powerful [B]loudspeakers[/B], researchers at The University of Western Australia were able to [b]hear[/b] clicking sounds coming from the roots of corn saplings. [/quote] Uh...what?
[quote]When a South African botanist Lyall Watson claimed in 1973 that plants had emotions that could be recorded on a lie detector test, [b]he was dismissed by many in the scientific community[/b].[/quote] When are scientist going to stop doing this? Aren't you a scientist because you're interested in finding out the unknown..?
[QUOTE=Used Car Salesman;36349290]Uh...what?[/QUOTE] They hooked up the loudspeakers to the plants and they tried to pick out sound.
It's only a matter of time before they evolve. I, for one, welcome our new plant overlords.
[QUOTE=Blackizzle;36349304]When are scientist going to stop doing this? Aren't you a scientist because you're interested in finding out the unknown..?[/QUOTE] Because it was and still is a ridiculous and unscientific claim - scientists can't just accept every crackpot theory that comes their way. I think that was a silly thing to put into this article as the fact that plants react to certain frequencies of sound does not lend any evidence to them having emotions. [editline]16th June 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=valkery;36349405]They hooked up the loudspeakers to the plants and they tried to pick out sound.[/QUOTE] I think he is wondering why they used loudspeakers instead of microphones.
[QUOTE=Hivemind;36349418]Because it was and still is a ridiculous and unscientific claim. [editline]16th June 2012[/editline] I think he is wondering why they used loudspeakers instead of microphones.[/QUOTE] They are the same thing, except that the microphone sends the data to a different receiver. Plus, adding a microphone would only have added another step, possibly rendering any findings impossible to detect.
[QUOTE=valkery;36349443]They are the same thing, except that the microphone sends the data to a different receiver. Plus, adding a microphone would only have added another step, possibly rendering any findings impossible to detect.[/QUOTE] I think they might have meant microphone instead of loudspeaker because they talk about detecting sounds, which is what a microphone does, not a loudspeaker. To be honest though they are identical anyway, since you can use a loudspeaker as a microphone and vice versa. They probably used loudspeakers to do the bit of the experiment where they emitted the 220Hz frequency though.
All I got from the article is that (some?) plant roots give off vibrations that attract other roots. The only benefit I see in this is for roots to grow into a strong mesh.
nobody thought of listening really hard at plants until now?
Oh God, what have I done? WHAT HAVE I DONE?! :suicide:
Sorry, you need to Log In to post a reply to this thread.