• Tony Robbins firewalk with me: 21 hurt on hot coals
    24 replies, posted
[quote]Tony Robbins suggested they “unleash the power within,” but for 21 people who burned their feet walking over hot coals, it was more about cooling their heels in a fountain.Police treated the nearly two dozen people for burns to their feet on Thursday night in San Jose during a weekend seminar with the motivational speaker, [URL="http://www.mercurynews.com/crime-courts/ci_21125630/san-jose-21-people-treated-burns-after-firewalk?source=rss"]The San Jose Mercury News[/URL] reported. Three of the people had serious injuries, and most suffered second- or third-degree burns. “I heard wails of pain, screams of agony,” witness Jonathan Correll told the Mercury News. “It was people seriously hurting, like they were being tortured. … First one person, then a couple minutes later another one, and there was just a line of people walking on that fire. It was just bizarre, man.” The event – with 6,000 registered – continues until Sunday. A fire department representative was at the event to prevent any accidental flare-ups, [URL="http://sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com/2012/07/20/several-injured-in-firewalk-at-san-jose-tony-robbins-event/"]CBS News [/URL]said. It took about 90 minutes for those who participated to walk over 10-foot long strips of hot coals 2 ½-feet wide. “When it was all said and done, we treated approximately 21 people at the scene for burns and we transported three,” San Jose Fire Capt. Reggie Williams told CBS. “The burns, from what I understand, were second and third degree burns.” On his [URL="http://www.tonyrobbins.com/"]website[/URL], Robbins suggests the “Firewalk Experience” is step 1 of his “four steps to transformation.” “Once you start doing the impossible (or at least what you thought was impossible), you can conquer the other fires of your life with ease,” the website says. There are those who succeeded in San Jose, the Mercury News reported. Yet, others crossed the coals unscathed at first, but then dipped their feet in a nearby fountain after blisters started to appear. Some people went to their hotel rooms and called 9-1-1. “It seemed abnormal that so many got hurt,” one witness told the newspaper.[/quote] [IMG]http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3483/3846430960_798c3b9a00.jpg[/IMG] source: [URL]http://www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/americas/united-states/120721/tony-robbins-firewalk-me-21-hurt-hot-coals[/URL] :v:
Why after the first person did people keep walking? If prepared properly walking on coals does not hurt, if it does than you should not be doing it, you think that would be obvious.
yeah walk on burning coals that'll make you more productive good motivation
Isn't this the same thing as the "if your friend jumped off a cliff would you follow him" statement? Why would people think that this was 100% safe? They're burning coals on fire, for god sake.
Walking on coals was a stupid thing to do in the first place, hardly motivational, but it sounds to me like they didn't allow for a good layer of ash to form first.
Probably didn't wet their feet enough
[QUOTE=nicatronTg;36874151]Isn't this the same thing as the "if your friend jumped off a cliff would you follow him" statement? Why would people think that this was 100% safe? They're burning coals on fire, for god sake.[/QUOTE] People have walked on coals for literally thousands of years without getting hurt. This sounds like THS or they stopped walking while still on the coals, which is fucking stupid.
To be fair, walking on coals is a widespread thing, and is [i]mostly[/i] safe [i]if[/i] you do it right. Obviously the speaker didn't exactly show them how to do it.
[QUOTE=nicatronTg;36874151]Isn't this the same thing as the "if your friend jumped off a cliff would you follow him" statement? Why would people think that this was 100% safe? They're burning coals on fire, for god sake.[/QUOTE] Thing is, it [i]is[/i] perfectly safe, providing A: You have the coals at the right temperature, and B: you walk them correctly. Go too slowly and your feet contact the coals too long, step too hard and you jam bits of burning hot coal in your feet. I still think it's a stupid stunt though.
Hope they enjoy the third degree burns.
[quote]It took about 90 minutes for those who participated to walk over 10-foot long strips of hot coals 2 ½-feet wide.[/quote] There's the problem! If you take 90 minutes to walk over 10 feet of hot coals you WILL get burned. Try moving a bit faster next time.
[QUOTE=Bletotum;36874148]yeah walk on burning coals that'll make you more productive good motivation[/QUOTE] it actually is. when a person gets in their head, "holy fuck, i just walked across hundreds of degrees without a hitch... fucking awesome" that idea can become entangled with a productive mindset
Things that are publicly funded should not be helping these people.
Tony Robbins wants all his Garmonbozia.
[QUOTE=cecilbdemodded;36874915]There's the problem! If you take 90 minutes to walk over 10 feet of hot coals you WILL get burned. Try moving a bit faster next time.[/QUOTE] Pretty sure that means the event lasted for 90 minutes, not each person took and hour and a half to move 10 feet.
[QUOTE=cecilbdemodded;36874915]There's the problem! If you take 90 minutes to walk over 10 feet of hot coals you WILL get burned. Try moving a bit faster next time.[/QUOTE] um. yea. not cooked ornothing
gee that guy in front of me sure is having a shitty time on those coals can't wait for my turn!!! There's a way to do coalwalking right (forming ash and dropping cold coal on top of the burning ones a bit before walking on them, moving fast and without putting all of your weight on either foot, etc) and something obviously went wrong here, but it just has to be a zombie convention if noone had the brains to stop after one or twenty guys got their feet burnt painfully
Walk on burning coals they said, it will be motivational they said!
people are dumb, they get so blind to obvious danger when "everyone's doin it"
Mythbusters did an episode on this. The coals have to be cooled on the upper layer and you have to walk smoothly and lightly, but not necessarily fast. If your foot or toes dig down below the upper layer of coals, you'll get burned all to fuck. If you try to run, your foot will smash right down into the hottest part of the bed. The key is not to panic, even if you start to feel the heat. I'm guessing these people started feeling the heat and panicked, which made shit infinitely worse.
[QUOTE=Lankist;36881522]Mythbusters did an episode on this. The coals have to be cooled on the upper layer and you have to walk smoothly and lightly, but not necessarily fast. If your foot or toes dig down below the upper layer of coals, you'll get burned all to fuck. If you try to run, your foot will smash right down into the hottest part of the bed. The key is not to panic, even if you start to feel the heat. I'm guessing these people started feeling the heat and panicked, which made shit infinitely worse.[/QUOTE] No, the problem is that they spent 90 minutes on a 10 foot long strip of hot coals. :v:
[QUOTE=Fatman55;36883369]No, the problem is that they spent 90 minutes on a 10 foot long strip of hot coals. :v:[/QUOTE] Do you have any idea how goddamn slow you're have to walk to move 10 feet in an hour and a half? Like, so slow that they'd be standing still most of the time. How hard is it to THINK and understand that the event lasted 90 minutes, not each person's walk. Fuck.
[QUOTE=Sgt-NiallR;36880884]Pretty sure that means the event lasted for 90 minutes, not each person took and hour and a half to move 10 feet.[/QUOTE] That was the joke. Haha, did you really think I believe each person took 90 minutes to walk over 10 feet of burning coals while the others stood around and watched them scream in pain, then THEY took 90 minutes too? That's crazy. /looks around nervously
Nice title.
You probably got fat people stepping into the coals and just staring at their feet to see what would happen You're supposed to run across it swiftly dingus. (Also, imagine if someone tripped and fell face first)
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