• Level-up life: how gaming can enhance your reality
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[TABLE="class: outer_border, width: 1000, align: center"] [TR] [TD][h2]Level-up life: how gaming can enhance your reality[/h2] [/TD] [TD][/TD] [/TR] [TR] [TD][SUB] [I]Playing Angry Birds or Mario Kart can warp your perception of what's real and what's virtual – and that might be just what you need[/I][/SUB] IT WAS mid-January and the roads in New York were slick with ice. I was driving aimlessly in search of a parking space when, while turning an especially tight bend, I went into a sickening sideways skid and headed straight for a row of snow-covered cars. I wasn't expecting what happened next. Without thinking about what I was doing, I twisted the wheel in a way that I had never done before. It worked: I came out of the skid and drove away unscathed. It was only after I had parked, legs shaking and heart pounding, that I recognised the reflexes that had kicked in during my moment of panic. This wasn't the first time I had made that emergency steering movement, after all. I had done so countless times before, but on those occasions the wheel in my hands had been a white plastic controller. [B]I had been saved by Mario Kart.[/B] My experience was given a name earlier this year by psychologists at [URL="http://www.ntu.ac.uk/soc/business/specialist_units/65593.html"]Nottingham Trent University[/URL] in the UK and Stockholm University in Sweden.[B] They call it "game transfer phenomenon", or GTP. In a controversial study, they described a brief mental hiccup during which a person reacts in the real world the way they would in a game. For some people, reality itself seems to temporarily warp. Could this effect be real?[/B] Most of us are gamers now. The stereotype of a guy living in his parents' basement on a diet of Cheetos and soda is long gone. The average gamer is 34 years old, gainfully employed and around 40 per cent are female. They play, on average, 8 hours a week and not just on consoles; around half of the gaming activity today is on smartphones. Still, the idea of Angry Birds spilling into reality does sound far-fetched. Indeed, if you read some of the descriptions of GTP, they can seem a little silly. After dropping his sandwich with the buttered side down, for example, one person interviewed said that he "instantly reached" for the "R2" controller button he had been using to retrieve items within PlayStation games. "My middle finger twitched, trying to reach it," he told the researchers ([URL="http://www.igi-global.com/article/international-journal-cyber-behavior-psychology/58041"][I]International Journal of Cyber Behavior, Psychology and Learning[/I], vol 1, p 15[/URL]). Mark Griffiths, one of the study's authors at Nottingham Trent, says the work provoked a torrent of letters. Half accused the researchers of disingenuously formalising idiosyncratic experiences reported by a small sample of 42 - that charge was countered by their subsequent study replicating the findings in 2000 gamers. The other half asked why Griffiths was rebranding a familiar finding. "They said, 'we've known about this for ages'," he recalls. "It's called the Tetris effect." [B]That term was coined in 1996 to refer to a peculiar effect caused by spending a long time moving the game's falling blocks into place. Play long enough and you could encounter all sorts of strange hallucinatory residuals: some reported witnessing bathroom tiles trembling, for example, or a floor-to-ceiling bookcase lurching down the wall. In less extreme but far more common cases, people saw moving images at the edge of their visual field when they closed their eyes.[/B] Most researchers agreed that the Tetris effect was the well-known consequence of engaging in a repetitive task. Chances are you have experienced this yourself, most commonly after a long day of driving, when you can see the road moving in front of you as you close your eyes. In fact, sleep researcher Robert Stickgold at Harvard University showed in 2000 that the Tetris effect was most pronounced during hypnagogia, the state between wakefulness and sleeping ([URL="http://www.sciencemag.org/content/290/5490/350.full"][I]Science[/I], vol 290, p 350[/URL]). If GTP was an extension of the Tetris effect, then it would be nothing new - which is exactly what many researchers think. "I'm not sure I see this as unique to video games," says C. Shawn Green, a cognitive scientist at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. "It's more of a consequence of a thing you do a lot." But Angelica Ortiz de Gortari of Nottingham Trent University - one of the GTP study co-authors - says that GTP affects people in ways that the Tetris effect does not. For one thing, the habituation effect that Stickgold reported tends to be felt mainly when other sensory stimulation is removed. The brief reality excursions that characterise GTP, by contrast, take place in broad daylight in the middle of other activities. "Some instances of GTP are closer to synaesthesia," she says, in which two or more senses are involuntarily and automatically scrambled. "You're literally overlaying the rules of one reality onto a different one." What's more, these are more than hallucinations, she says. As I found on that icy day in New York, GTP can change your behaviour. What causes that to happen? For one thing, gaming has changed profoundly since Tetris. Better graphics cards and bigger displays are deepening the illusion of reality in games. They are not just about moving joysticks and mice anymore - thanks to the Nintendo Wii and the Xbox Kinect, physical movements that mirror the real thing are involved. [B]Brain train[/B] Sophisticated video games have had demonstrable effects on their players.[B] For example, people who frequently play action games often outperform non-gamers on measures of perception and cognition.[/B] Other studies have found that intense video game practice improved players' ability to carry out complex [URL="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20060111"]hand-eye coordination tasks[/URL] and their [URL="http://www.nature.com/neuro/journal/v12/n5/abs/nn.2296.html"]contrast sensitivity[/URL]. This shouldn't be a surprise, says [URL="http://www.icn.ucl.ac.uk/Staff-Lists/MemberDetails.php?Title=Dr&FirstName=Paul&LastName=Burgess"]Mark Burgess[/URL], a neuropsychologist at University College London. "The brain is constantly reconfiguring itself. Everything new that we learn means that some connections in the brain have been added or altered, even if temporarily," he says. As a result, Burgess says, the brain is continually creating "schemata" - behavioural ruts that have become entrenched through repetition. For example, when an experienced driver approaches a set of traffic lights and they turn red, the driver does not have to think about changing gear, braking and so on. New drivers, by contrast, must consider each step. Though he doesn't think the synaesthesia interpretation of GTP holds water, he does think it is inevitable that the brain's plasticity can "cause inefficiency when one switches to a different environment". In other words, we are only hardwired to deal with one reality at a time. A rapid switchover will have consequences. One thing is for sure: we are spending an increasing amount of time in a digital space, the rules of which don't entirely mirror those of reality, so Ortiz de Gortari expects more of the virtual world to leak into the real one. As for me, I am just glad that my Mario Kart driving expertise kicked in when it did. Fingers crossed that's the only thing it gave me. Throwing bananas and exploding shells at opponents are vital tactics - so if we happen to meet one day, you may want to duck. [/TD] [TD][/TD] [/TR] [/TABLE] [URL="http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg21228441.600-levelup-life-how-gaming-can-enhance-your-reality.html?full=true"]Source[/URL]
I once read an article that said that the hands of most gamers are as accurate as surgeon's ones. also, interesting read
[QUOTE=lapsus_;34050491]I once read an article that said that the hands of most gamers are as accurate as surgeon's ones. also, interesting read[/QUOTE] makes sense if you play games that require mouse accuracy
Can you explain to me how does the table enhance my reality? Yeah, one can do neat stuff them, but there's no fucking point in this case. LETSSS use fucking 750 fixed width so if anybody uses a device with low res screen, it fucking shits up everything, shall we? There's like.... ABSOLUTELY no reason why to use it over a [release]... but yeah go with it instead.
[QUOTE=lapsus_;34050491]I once read an article that said that the hands of most gamers are as accurate as surgeon's ones. also, interesting read[/QUOTE] Yeah and there was also an article that said gamer's reaction is that of a jet pilot
So your saying if I gave people random scraps of metal, they'd give me hats? [sp]Failed joke[/sp]
[QUOTE=AceOfDivine;34050621]Yeah and there was also an article that said gamer's reaction is that of a jet pilot[/QUOTE] I really wish that were true.
What the fuck, this doesn't happen to me.
[QUOTE=UberMunchkin;34050671]So your saying if I gave people random scraps of metal, they'd give me hats? [sp]Failed joke[/sp][/QUOTE]No, but if you tell them you play shooters they might hire you as a surgeon.
[QUOTE=UberMunchkin;34050671]So your saying if I gave people random scraps of metal, they'd give me hats? [sp]Failed joke[/sp][/QUOTE] [IMG]http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_2BXV1JRu8rY/STKrc8GuCEI/AAAAAAAAAbk/CBJpWSksmrM/s400/wearing-brainwave-hat.JPG[/IMG] yes
[QUOTE=BloodFox1222;34050688]I really wish that were true.[/QUOTE] depends on what games you play.
[QUOTE=Uncle Bourbon;34050595]makes sense if you play games that require mouse accuracy[/QUOTE] Shit, any form of input for a video game is going to increase your hand-eye co-ordination, and your reflexes to some extent. Think about it, when was the last time you looked at your gamepad or keyboard when playing because you missed a key? How quickly did you react to the last time you managed to miss a button press? If you play video games long enough, the answers should be "I can't remember actually" and "Less than a second". Your muscles start to remember the positions of things, sure, but you can move things around and still have very similar results.
I believe it, I remember playing one of those crappy flash games where you have to match up the colored shapes to eliminate them, and then when I did the dishes that night I didn't want to put them away in groups of the same type because I was afraid that they would disappear. Then I realized how dumb that sounded.
A-ha! Take THAT "video games are destroying the youth" infidels! Gamer master race! Oh and playing drums on Rock Band is the most constructive a rhythm game can get for now. Made real drums a breeze to start playing.
The Mario kart story is the only really cool thing I saw in this article, most of it I've read before
[QUOTE=hexpunK;34050720]Shit, any form of input for a video game is going to increase your hand-eye co-ordination, and your reflexes to some extent. Think about it, when was the last time you looked at your gamepad or keyboard when playing because you missed a key? How quickly did you react to the last time you managed to miss a button press? If you play video games long enough, the answers should be "I can't remember actually" and "Less than a second". Your muscles start to remember the positions of things, sure, but you can move things around and still have very similar results.[/QUOTE] Fucking starcraft key bindings.
[QUOTE=hexpunK;34050720]Shit, any form of input for a video game is going to increase your hand-eye co-ordination, and your reflexes to some extent. Think about it, when was the last time you looked at your gamepad or keyboard when playing because you missed a key? How quickly did you react to the last time you managed to miss a button press? If you play video games long enough, the answers should be "I can't remember actually" and "Less than a second". Your muscles start to remember the positions of things, sure, but you can move things around and still have very similar results.[/QUOTE] Fucking this, though to what extent it improves can depend on the game itself If you try becoming a hardcore CS player I'd imagine your reflexes and hand-eye coordination would be much better than if you played some other games broke my damn automerge
[QUOTE=BloodFox1222;34050688]I really wish that were true.[/QUOTE] It depends on the game, if you played games like UT and Quake for years your reflexes would increase.
[QUOTE=lapsus_;34050491]I once read an article that said that the hands of most gamers are as accurate as surgeon's ones. also, interesting read[/QUOTE] Not mine. They shake and twitch so much that they feel like I'm holding a sniper in the first MGS WITHOUT being on pentazemin. You couldn't even aim at a person 100 meters away because of the gigantic sway that would take the crosshairs to the head of a giant. [editline]4th January 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=Electrocuter;34051010]It depends on the game, if you played games like UT and Quake for years your reflexes would increase.[/QUOTE] That never works out for me. Some days, I feel like I can't even turn the mouse and aim at someone, others I feel like I'm on every single adrenaline giving focus enhancing drug known to man.
Sometimes when I'm half-asleep and I'm half-dreaming about playing a video game, I'll feel my fingers twitching
Watch as [I]some news agency[/I] turns this into "violent videogames train your children into terrorists by teaching them how to use guns!"
[quote]They play, on average, 8 hours a week and not just on consoles; around half of the gaming activity today is on smartphones.[/quote] How the fuck can you call dicking about with accellerometer games actual GAMING? it's like saying that looking at a picture of the Hammer And Sickle makes you a communist.
Can't remember who said it, but some officer in the airforce or whoever said gamers have the reaction times of ace fighter pilots but the bodies of a 40 year old chain smoker or something.
[QUOTE=MR-X;34051612]Can't remember who said it, but some officer in the airforce or whoever said gamers have the reaction times of ace fighter pilots but the bodies of a 40 year old chain smoker or something.[/QUOTE] uhh, I have neither "40 year old chain smokers" Wow, TOTALLY not biased!
[QUOTE=Awesomecaek;34050602]Can you explain to me how does the table enhance my reality? Yeah, one can do neat stuff them, but there's no fucking point in this case. LETSSS use fucking 750 fixed width so if anybody uses a device with low res screen, it fucking shits up everything, shall we? There's like.... ABSOLUTELY no reason why to use it over a [release]... but yeah go with it instead.[/QUOTE]Why does it seem like the only thing you do is come into news threads and complain about the way the OP is written? Just shut up already, this is like the fifth time you've done this. I mean we get it, you have a shitty monitor or you refuse to use your whole monitor, stop coming into every single news thread and bitching about your problems.
[QUOTE=Atlascore;34051737]Why does it seem like the only thing you do is come into news threads and complain about the way the OP is written? Just shut up already, this is like the fifth time you've done this. I mean we get it, you have a shitty monitor or you refuse to use your whole monitor, stop coming into every single news thread and bitching about your problems.[/QUOTE] Look at my post history, look at my last threads made, look at ratings on the particular post, and then shut up. I have nothing against reasonable use of tables with proper usage of relative sizing, but fixed WIDTH=750 is a porkery which shouldn't be used, ever, and whoever uses it shouldn't ever be allowed to publish any sort of content on internet. It's wrong by principle, and I will keep bitching as long as people keep doing it.
[QUOTE=Awesomecaek;34050602]Can you explain to me how does the table enhance my reality? Yeah, one can do neat stuff them, but there's no fucking point in this case. LETSSS use fucking 750 fixed width so if anybody uses a device with low res screen, it fucking shits up everything, shall we? There's like.... ABSOLUTELY no reason why to use it over a [release]... but yeah go with it instead.[/QUOTE] yeah it works fine on my device which is like 400x600, it just wraps the text(just like every normal post) idk take a screenshot or something what is your issue(also, get a better device)
[QUOTE=MR-X;34051612]Can't remember who said it, but some officer in the airforce or whoever said gamers have the reaction times of ace fighter pilots but the bodies of a 40 year old chain smoker or something.[/QUOTE] I applaud a man who smokes chains. It takes a large gut to do that.
[QUOTE=latin_geek;34051521]Watch as [I]some news agency[/I] turns this into "violent videogames train your children into terrorists by teaching them how to use guns!"[/QUOTE] "Couter straike taught me how to euse teh ak!" Huh, why do they only mention it as turning us into "terrorists" and never into army soldiers who FIGHT actual terrorists?
[QUOTE=Soda;34051891]yeah it works fine on my device which is like 400x600, it just wraps the text(just like every normal post) idk take a screenshot or something what is your issue[/QUOTE] But there is simply no fucking point in this case. When you use tables to produce two parallel columns, ok, there stylistic advantages that might arguably be worth it, but why the hell use it in this case? [editline]4th January 2012[/editline] Just for reference [url=http://www.facepunch.com/threads/1151761]THIS[/url] are tables done right. The 0 width means the actual table width is left to relative browser interpretation, and everything scales properly, no matter what. It's also case of using tables which make the post actually look nice. Not just "HURR LETS USE TABLES JUST FOR THE SAKE OF IT"
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