• You can swap a Tesla battery faster than you can fill a tank of gas.
    132 replies, posted
[QUOTE=kaze4159;41122907][video=youtube;VLCdP6sMN9k]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLCdP6sMN9k[/video] These aren't little smart cars[/QUOTE] There are so many things wrong about the video. Wet track = poor grip for both. Viper driver was either holding back, couldnt get traction, or just a poor driver; Link in the video says the Tesla's best time was 12.3@110 A 2008 (not even the newest Viper) is listed as, stock, doing 10.9@127.7 The viper weighs a lot less and has much more power. Give it someone that knows how to drive, a proper track, and itd whoop the Tesla all day.
[QUOTE=Ryukrawr?;41122847]I bet my 91 Camry can out speed these fuckers easy :P[/QUOTE] I bet you never did the research on these Teslas.
[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vvHTN0Yi1t4[/media] The acceleration of a standard electric motor is a lot faster than a standard ICE motor. If you want to race a Model S on a shot strip you will lose. If you have enough track you can overtake it once it reaches its top speed. The only ICE motor vehicles I've seen accelerate faster than a Model S have been either Super cars or modified cars. The car is also a 4 ton Luxury sedan that can hold it's own against proud sports cars. If a company put as much R&D into an electric driven race car as there is in race cars today, you could probably produce something that could destroy most super cars.
[QUOTE=FordLord;41123092]There are so many things wrong about the video. Wet track = poor grip for both. Viper driver was either holding back, couldnt get traction, or just a poor driver; Link in the video says the Tesla's best time was 12.3@110 A 2008 (not even the newest Viper) is listed as, stock, doing 10.9@127.7 The viper weighs a lot less and has much more power. Give it someone that knows how to drive, a proper track, and itd whoop the Tesla all day.[/QUOTE] If you look up now you'll see the point going over your head.
[QUOTE=No_Excuses;41115600]So at 90% efficiency we're talking like 194 to 275 MJ utilized. But that's at a weight of 1500lbs for 80kWh model. Now say a small car with a 10 gallon tank means about 1370 MJ total. With a 40% efficient combustion engine that's still 548MJ utilized as mechanical motion. That comes at a weight of about 61lbs of fuel. [B]Energy densities factoring in efficiency:[/B] Lithium Ion batteries: 0.18MJ/lb Gasoline: 9.1MJ/lb In conclusion: batteries still suck hard.[/QUOTE] We just discovered that battery that's the size of lincon's eye on a penny that could power pretty much anything for days.
Unoffical video: [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5VH4JloWFEI[/media] They still had some time left after the first swap so they rolled up another Model S and swapped out the battery before the Audi finished. [quote]Frenzied drivers will still have to do some work though — they’ll have to drop off the battery on the return leg of their journey and pay an unspecified “transport fee”, though they can also choose to keep the battery and pony up the difference between the price between of the old and new batteries. The first swap-capable locations will be at supercharger stations located along California’s I-5, thought the company plans to bring them online at east coast superchargers in short order. Judging from the videos pouring out of the event the overall tone of the presentation was exuberant, and it’s hard not to see why: the company is looking at hot-swappable batteries for its electric vehicles as a way to put them on even footing with traditional gas-powered cars. Of course, that’s not to say that bringing those changeable batteries to the masses is going to be easy. [/quote] [url]http://techcrunch.com/2013/06/20/tesla-shows-off-a-90-second-battery-swap-system-wants-it-at-supercharging-stations-by-years-end/[/url]
Wow, that's actually really impressive. That's even quicker than it used to take for me to change battery pack in an old RC car of mine. And it looks like it could be sped up a bit too, since that's probably just a (relatively) quickly assembled prototype.
Imagine having these all along the major interstate highways. Pick up a battery at one, drop it off at another. Continue until you reach your destination. No more range anxiety. Not a penny spent on fuel. No time wasted filling up or charging.
[QUOTE=DoctorSalt;41123178]If you look up now you'll see the point going over your head.[/QUOTE] I actually have the point right here. The point being that the video is pretty shoddy. Poor driver, wet track, etc.
[QUOTE=FordLord;41123432]I actually have the point right here. The point being that the video is pretty shoddy. Poor driver, wet track, etc.[/QUOTE] Wouldn't the wet track affect both cars?
[QUOTE=FordLord;41123092]There are so many things wrong about the video. Wet track = poor grip for both. Viper driver was either holding back, couldnt get traction, or just a poor driver; Link in the video says the Tesla's best time was 12.3@110 A 2008 (not even the newest Viper) is listed as, stock, doing 10.9@127.7 The viper weighs a lot less and has much more power. Give it someone that knows how to drive, a proper track, and itd whoop the Tesla all day.[/QUOTE] you sound afraid for the future of cars
[QUOTE=FordLord;41117621]Considering you save tons of money buying a gas powered car, its not exactly ridiculous. For instance, my car; 1999 Subaru Impreza. Paid ~5000 back in '05. We've put 100k miles or so on it since then, and it gets 30mpg or so. After around 7 years of ownership, including the original cost, gas, maintenance, and upgrades, theres been around 20k USD spent on the car. Compared to the cost of buying a Tesla, maintenance, etc. It ends up not being so bad paying for gas, when after 7 years ive only spent.. what, less than 1/3 the cost of a Tesla Model S?[/QUOTE] Meh, not really a good comparison, a Tesla is mostly so expensive due to its position as a luxury sedan.
[QUOTE=ayaki;41123715]Wouldn't the wet track affect both cars?[/QUOTE] A wet track does affect both cars. Though, a viper weighs 1000lbs less than a Tesla, and has around 180 more horses iirc, so a wet track would have a bigger affect
[QUOTE=ironman17;41114848]But how much capacity do these batteries have? How many megajoules of electricity can they hold? Apparently gasoline has around 137 megajoules locked up in each gallon of the stuff.[/QUOTE] Gotta factor in the (in)efficiency of a combustion engine. Also AFAIK Diesel has a higher energy density, and Diesel engines are also often a tad bit more effective than their gasoline counterparts. And I can fill up my car at the semi-truck diesel pumps. I barely have to wait :v:
I honestly wish Tesla would do something with the Scottish government, we're the ideal place for it, small country, all about our renewables and shit, and if we had a sort of trade in program where you get a discount on a Tesla man, I'd happily get one, all it would need is support in the form of these charging/swap stations.
One of my neighbors bought a Model S. It's so badass.
I was at the tesla store/dealer today as they had the highest priced model s you could literally have. They have 6 or 7 spots reserved with an awesome red carpet in the parking garage to the mall that you can pull your car in and charge it while you shop (Supercharging of course). Two Roadsters, 4 model S all next to each other. So amazing to see.
Here's the official video! [media]http://vimeo.com/68832891#[/media] [editline]21st June 2013[/editline] You can bring two electric cars to a full charge in the time it takes you to fill one Audi. With a lot less effort.
I've been following this car for a while online now and the amount of people who are stuck in the past and say that it's not a "real" car is ridiculous. I know it will still be a long time before the ICE is obsolete but trust me, that day will come and it will be replaced by a far better alternative.
[quote] Frenzied drivers will still have to do some work though — they’ll have to drop off the battery on the return leg of their journey and pay an unspecified “transport fee”, though they can also choose to keep the battery and pony up the difference between the price between of the old and new batteries. The first swap-capable locations will be at supercharger stations located along California’s I-5, thought the company plans to bring them online at east coast superchargers in short order. [/quote] I don't really get this part. Does this mean if we "fill up" our electric cars at a random electric station, we'll have to remember to come back to that random electric station to get our battery back? AKA you won't be able to just travel long distances doing the above method, as you'll constantly be swapping out batteries that aren't yours? What if someone pulls up and takes your battery you "dropped off" when you first went to charge the car? So if I were to (for example) travel long enough on a single trip to have to swap batteries out 4-5 times, would I get charged for EACH and every battery? It sounds like this will be extremely expensive.
I'm not exactly sure. I would think tesla would allow you to drop them off at any station. I wonder how long you can keep a battery before they charge you for it. I think it would be easier for tesla to own all the batteries and you just "rent" them out when you swap. That would also get rid of the skeptics complaining about future battery cost on the consumer. Then that would be left for the electric industry to be on equal footing would be to build the infrastructure for it, and develop better batteries.
[QUOTE=kaze4159;41122907][video=youtube;VLCdP6sMN9k]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLCdP6sMN9k[/video] These aren't little smart cars[/QUOTE] It cant beat a SRT10, it has 400-600hp wtf.
Instant acceleration.
Yeah? Well I can swap the gas tank in my car out faster than it takes to fill a new one. Take that!
[QUOTE=alx12345;41128876]It cant beat a SRT10, it has 400-600hp wtf.[/QUOTE] Its the sheer amount of torque electric motors produce even at low speeds, which is very important for acceleration. [IMG]http://www.velvetron.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/tesla_torquegraph.jpg[/IMG] Picture from several years ago, but you get the idea.
[QUOTE=OvB;41128848]I'm not exactly sure. I would think tesla would allow you to drop them off at any station. I wonder how long you can keep a battery before they charge you for it. I think it would be easier for tesla to own all the batteries and you just "rent" them out when you swap. That would also get rid of the skeptics complaining about future battery cost on the consumer. Then that would be left for the electric industry to be on equal footing would be to build the infrastructure for it, and develop better batteries.[/QUOTE] Yeah, a flexible battery [I]"leasing"[/I] program is the best way to offset fuckexpensive batteries and handle the charging station swapping ordeal.
Holy hell. I was expecting someone to pull a handle and slide batteries in and out. I was not expecting the car to drive into a jig and a robot to unbolt and swap the battery without the driver even leaving the car. That's really, really cool.
[QUOTE=CubeManv2;41128128]I was at the tesla store/dealer today as they had the highest priced model s you could literally have. They have 6 or 7 spots reserved with an awesome red carpet in the parking garage to the mall that you can pull your car in and charge it while you shop (Supercharging of course). Two Roadsters, 4 model S all next to each other. So amazing to see.[/QUOTE] Where the hell do you live?
What is the song at 7 minutes on the vimeo video in OP?
[QUOTE=Demache;41129019]Its the sheer amount of torque electric motors produce even at low speeds, which is very important for acceleration. Picture from several years ago, but you get the idea.[/QUOTE] That actually has nothing to do with it. Stock Viper does 10.9 second quarter mile. The Tesla in the video supposedly does a 12.3 second quarter mile. Basically it comes down to poor track conditions, and probably a crappy driver in the Viper. Also, stock viper has a faster 0-60 speed than the Tesla in the video.
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