• Teen faces suspension for anti-bullying video depicting fake suicide
    35 replies, posted
[QUOTE]The high school freshman suspended for five days after she created an anti-bullying video and Facebook page about a fictional girl who commits suicide says she tried to explain her work to school officials to no avail. “I just created the video in order to raise awareness of the major issue that’s bullying,” 15-year-old Jessica Barba told Matt Lauer on TODAY. “I don’t understand why I’m being punished for it.” Jessica made the six-minute video for a class at Longwood High School in Middle Island, N.Y. The assignment was to create a project about an important issue. The video, posted on YouTube, tells the story of the fictional 12-year-old Hailey Bennett (played by Jessica), who lost her mother at age 3, is abused by her dad and is all alone after her only friend moves away. Hailey gets bullied at school daily, is mocked on her fake Facebook page, and ultimately, ends her life. The video and the Facebook page had disclaimers saying Hailey was a fictional character, according to TODAY. A concerned parent saw Hailey’s Facebook page, which features an update saying “I wanna be dead,” and called the police, who contacted the school, according to TODAY. When Jessica was called to the assistant principal’s office, she said she was confronted with printouts that did not include her disclaimer. She tried to plead her case. “I tried explaining it so much ... they had the printouts of the page but none of the printouts that they had were the ones where I specify that it was a fake page,” Jessica said, adding that the person who handed them over “hadn’t been able to go down far enough to see that it was fake.” Her mother, Jody, did bring printouts showing the disclaimer to school officials, but she told Lauer, “they didn’t really care too much about that.” Superintendent Allan Gerstenlauer told[URL="http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Teen-Suspended-School-Bully-Video-Suicide-Class-Project-152591225.html"]WNBC New York on Tuesday[/URL] that Jessica’s video, posted online on May 15, was "unfortunate in that it created a substantial disruption to the school." When she was punished, “I started hysterically crying,” Jessica said in an earlier interview. “I couldn’t even believe that I was getting in trouble for something that I had worked so hard on, and the only intent of it was good.” Jessica faces a suspension hearing at school today. Her father, Michael, called the punishment “extensive,” and said he wants Jessica allowed back at school, the suspension erased and his daughter given the chance to turn in the project. “This is a great project,” he said on TODAY. “There’s thousands of people that love it, and it can be fixed. This can be fixed, simple.” He said: “I’m very proud of the things she’s done here.” Jessica said her teacher knew she was making a video about bullying but didn’t know she was creating the Facebook page. Jessica said she posted the video online before turning it in. When asked by Lauer if she did things in the wrong order, she was unsure. “No. I think that maybe it was, but I’m not too sure if I would rechange the order in which I did it,” she answered. Jessica seems dumbfounded that she got suspended for trying to spotlight an issue she’s been learning about since she first began school. “They’ve been teaching us since we were in kindergarten that you treat people the way you want to be treated and not to bully,” Jessica said in the earlier interview. “Then I make some type of movement in it and I get punished for it.” The New York Civil Liberties Union disapproved of the suspension. “Students don’t lose their right to free speech at the school house gates,” Amol Sinha, director of the Suffolk County chapter of the NYCLU, said in an email to TODAY.com. “As students prepare to participate as full citizens in society, schools should encourage independent thought and dialogue about political and current events, even controversial ones. No school should ever punish a student because they disagree with what she’s saying, which appears to be exactly what happened here.” [/QUOTE] Source: [url]http://moms.today.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/05/23/11828841-teen-suspended-for-anti-bullying-video-with-fake-suicide?chromedomain=todayhealth[/url]
While I dig civil liberties unions, students in public schools sort of do lose most of their free speech at the school's doors. [I]Frederick v. Morse Bethel School District #43 v. Fraser Santa Fe Independent School District v. Doe[/I] While [I]Tinker v. Des Moines[/I] implied that students do not lose [I]all[/I] of their rights at the gates, subsequent rulings have given schools a wide berth in determining what is and is not appropriate speech in the school. They can basically stop anything they feel diminishes the safe, academic environment of the school. That said, schools should not have kids create presentations on "important issues" if they are unwilling to get into uncomfortable territory. It's one or the other.
Might have wanted to handle that facebook page better, maybe activating privacy options would have prevented that parent from seeing the page. Stay professional
Isn't bullying a bad thing? Why punish someone whose highlighting why it's a bad thing? Seriously.
As far as I'm concerned, the school has no jurrisdiction over the student when they're outside of school. However, if the student did this on school premises or with school issued hardware, then the school does indeed have some jurisdiction.
[QUOTE=Eluveitie;36076090]Isn't bullying a bad thing? Why punish someone whose highlighting why it's a bad thing? Seriously.[/QUOTE] Because think of the children
This is fucking dumb. America, why does so much stupid shit happen in your education system?
[QUOTE=cqbcat;36076286]As far as I'm concerned, the school has no jurrisdiction over the student when they're outside of school. However, if the student did this on school premises or with school issued hardware, then the school does indeed have some jurisdiction.[/QUOTE] Jesus Christ this. Why do schools feel so responsible to be the police of the students? I see students getting suspended all the time for doing shit that has nothing to do with the school or its students.
The article has no quotes from the school officials, and no official reason for suspension so it makes this seem one-sided. And the source doesn't seem like a very objective one.
Meanwhile in my Canadian high school I made a mock PSA showing the Punisher beating the shit out of and shooting people for littering. And got an A+
[QUOTE=Negrul1;36076821]This is fucking dumb. America, why does so much stupid shit happen in your education system?[/QUOTE] I question the abilities of your nations school systems if you are dumb enough to think that a single school district's stupid decision can reflect the hundreds of thousands of other nation wide school districts, all of which operate differently according to state and country regulations. But I guess it's easier to make uneducated assertions that make you look like a fool.
[QUOTE=OatmealMan;36076088]Might have wanted to handle that facebook page better, maybe activating privacy options would have prevented that parent from seeing the page. Stay professional[/QUOTE] exactly what I thought be a pro, avoid leaks and danger
[QUOTE=King Tiger;36079063]I question the abilities of your nations school systems if you are dumb enough to think that a single school district's stupid decision can reflect the hundreds of thousands of other nation wide school districts, all of which operate differently according to state and country regulations. But I guess it's easier to make uneducated assertions that make you look like a fool.[/QUOTE] It's just that whenever one of these stories crops up, it's usually in the USA. It doesn't really help the image.
[QUOTE=King Tiger;36079063]I question the abilities of your nations school systems if you are dumb enough to think that a single school district's stupid decision can reflect the hundreds of thousands of other nation wide school districts, all of which operate differently according to state and country regulations. But I guess it's easier to make uneducated assertions that make you look like a fool.[/QUOTE] And this changes the correlation how?
new york? theres your problem
[QUOTE=King Tiger;36079063]I question the abilities of your nations school systems if you are dumb enough to think that a single school district's stupid decision can reflect the hundreds of thousands of other nation wide school districts, all of which operate differently according to state and country regulations. But I guess it's easier to make uneducated assertions that make you look like a fool.[/QUOTE] I'm not an expert on the American educational system, but it just seems like this sort of thing happens fairly often and when it does it's almost always in America. It would be reasonable to assume from that that there is something wrong with the American educational system that is not with everywhere else's.
This hard line approach school administrations love taking is useful only in making sure nothing gets done. There was no reason why this student needed to be suspended. However, by putting an obviously dedicated student's academic career in peril, the administration can at least say they did [I]something[/I] to combat the ubiquitous bullying problem, which is all the justification they need to avoid implementing a more useful (and possibly expensive) solution.
and this is why in america kids, you don't get to do any fun projects.
From where do you draw the conclusion that these things only happen in the United States?
[QUOTE=King Tiger;36080987]From where do you draw the conclusion that these things only happen in the United States?[/QUOTE] I think it's because they don't happen in other countries like four times a week.
[img]http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/9313/badspelling.jpg[/img] From the quality of these captions, I'd say this suspension is perfectly justified.
[QUOTE=King Tiger;36079063]I question the abilities of your nations school systems if you are dumb enough to think that a single school district's stupid decision can reflect the hundreds of thousands of other nation wide school districts, all of which operate differently according to state and country regulations. But I guess it's easier to make uneducated assertions that make you look like a fool.[/QUOTE] Because things like this has only happened in one school district, once. No. That's not true, and since it's part of the U.S education system, that's where the fault lies.
[QUOTE=Zacca;36081317]Because things like this has only happened in one school district, once. No. That's not true, and since it's part of the U.S education system, that's where the fault lies.[/QUOTE] Oooooooor, it could be that instead of a higher frequency of these fuck ups, it's reported more. For all we know, Sweden or whatever could have this happen a lot too. Also, probably should have put a disclaimer on the Facebook page :p
Sad thing is a kid that actually makes another person commit suicide gets no suspensions.
The part with the dad in the video was hilarious tbh.
The school [I]obviously[/I] didn't want her doing their job for them, since she's better at it than they are.
[QUOTE=carcarcargo;36076799]Because think of the children[/QUOTE] Isn't that what the video is doing? lol
And in other news: senior faces five minute talk with principal over [i]causing[/i] actual suicide. This is so backwards.
Education in my city (NYC) fucking pisses me off sometimes. We live in probably the most liberal city in the country and we still get some of the stupidest, uptight bullshit punishments ever.
[QUOTE=Zacca;36081317]Because things like this has only happened in one school district, once. No. That's not true, and since it's part of the U.S education system, that's where the fault lies.[/QUOTE] You have no knowledge of education in the U.S. then. You should not talk about thinks you don't know anything about.
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