• Smoke seen pouring from chimney at Russian consulate in San Francisco
    37 replies, posted
[img]http://ww4.hdnux.com/photos/65/42/36/14034823/4/920x920.jpg[/img] [quote] SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Acrid, black smoke was seen pouring from a chimney at the Russian consulate in San Francisco Friday, a day after the Trump administration ordered its closure amid escalating tensions between the United States and Russia. Firefighters who arrived at the scene were turned away by consulate officials who came from inside the building. An Associated Press reporter heard people who came from inside the building tell firefighters that there was no problem and that consulate staff were burning unidentified items in a fireplace. Mindy Talamadge, a spokeswoman from the San Francisco Fire Department, said the department received a call about the smoke and sent a crew to investigate but determined the smoke was coming from the chimney. "They had a fire going in their fireplace," she said. Talmadge said she did not know what they were burning on a day when normally cool San Francisco temperatures had already climbed to 95 degrees by noon. [/Quote] [URL="http://www.sfchronicle.com/news/us/article/Smoke-seen-pouring-from-Russian-consulate-in-San-12167619.php"] San Francisco Chronicle[/URL] [media]https://twitter.com/sullyfoto/status/903699211668963329[/media]
is you know, the vodka kolbasa campfire for fun
Is destroying sensitive documents when having to leave a building unusual? I can imagine that you don't want certain documents to leave the safety of lock-up, or lose sight of them while moving so burning them is the only way to keep the information safe.
So they can buy a GOP congressman but they can't buy a shredder :v:
[QUOTE=FalconKrunch;52637853]Is destroying sensitive documents when having to leave a building unusual? I can imagine that you don't want certain documents to leave the safety of lock-up, or lose sight of them while moving so burning them is the only way to keep the information safe.[/QUOTE] Yea but they're [I]Russian[/I] so it's gotta be [I]evil[/I] information. That's why the smoke is black. If the documents were about nice things the smoke wouldn't be black, obviously!
[QUOTE=FalconKrunch;52637853]Is destroying sensitive documents when having to leave a building unusual? I can imagine that you don't want certain documents to leave the safety of lock-up, or lose sight of them while moving so burning them is the only way to keep the information safe.[/QUOTE] no when you're talking about diplomatic embassies in hostile countries.
Don't embassies get to take documents and stuff with them when they leave. as diplomatic property?
[QUOTE=Sgt Doom;52637889]Don't embassies get to take documents and stuff with them when they leave. as diplomatic property?[/QUOTE] I imagine they have documents and such that they'd rather just destroy than to transport (and lose track of in the rush to box everything up and leave)
[QUOTE=Raidyr;52637860]So they can buy a GOP congressman but they can't buy a shredder :v:[/QUOTE] To be honest with enough effort you can put shredded papers back together, can't do the same with burned paper.
So who is the new pope going to be?
You'd think they would be more discrete when destroying documents
[QUOTE=Dr.C;52638063]So who is the new pope going to be?[/QUOTE] You mean the new patriarch of the Orthodox Church right?
[QUOTE=Dr.C;52638063]So who is the new pope going to be?[/QUOTE] I heard Putin was the only one on the ballot.
They have chosen the dark pope
It is not unusual to destroy documents while moving or shutting down an embassy. Embassies deal with confidential stuff as a matter of course, and that's not even considering the spies that surely are among them. Also, standard practice is to shred, then burn. A lesson we learned after our embassy in Tehran was seized, and many shredded documents were pieced back together. With a sufficiently large team, shredded documents, even cross-shredded documents, can be reassembled; shredding is still done first as it is faster (so if emergency-purging everything, you at least force them to spend a lot of time putting it back together before getting anything useful if they seize it before you can burn it) and whole paper sometimes doesn't burn completely, small fragments get caught in the updraft and sucked out, which can be bad if that document is sensitive enough. Plus, shredded paper burns faster.
I mean, it's literally 100 degrees here today
Generally black smoke indicates plastics or other petrol products burning. They're probably burning more than just paper documents there.
It doesn't seem that big a deal. A lot of sensitive info passes through diplomatic buildings.
[QUOTE=F.X Clampazzo;52638389]Generally black smoke indicates plastics or other petrol products burning. They're probably burning more than just paper documents there.[/QUOTE]folders maybe, perhaps even some electronics? [QUOTE=Talishmar;52638189]They have chosen the dark pope[/QUOTE][img]http://cache2.asset-cache.net/xr/164574633.jpg?v=1&c=IWSAsset&k=3&d=77BFBA49EF8789215ABF3343C02EA548F5987DA92E601AFFCDE7B396904E43320E42FD9693126884A55A1E4F32AD3138[/img] ?
[URL="http://i.imgur.com/Bm6ejA5.jpg"]Hey it seems there's a picture of the office burning the papers after the announcement[/URL]
[QUOTE=Raidyr;52637860]So they can buy a GOP congressman but they can't buy a shredder :v:[/QUOTE] Defeating document sheedding is easy. Burning is the most secure destruction method. Sounds like they're burning hdds too.
[QUOTE=Dr.C;52638063]So who is the new pope going to be?[/QUOTE] [Media]https://twitter.com/IsaacDovere/status/903727352328441857[/media]
[QUOTE=download;52638742]Defeating document sheedding is easy. Burning is the most secure destruction method. Sounds like they're burning hdds too.[/QUOTE] Maybe but they can't burn the platters so probably physical destruction of platters and then burning to kill the pcb. Assuming they're not using exclusively mag tape, CD/DVD type disk, and/or SSDs.
[QUOTE=Blind Lulu;52639042]They could just install Fallout 4 if they want to kill their SSDs.[/QUOTE] Or some particularly shit DRM that does a lot of encrypting/decrypting a whole lot as a pathetic attempt to stop piracy.
[QUOTE=F.X Clampazzo;52638975]Maybe but they can't burn the platters so probably physical destruction of platters and then burning to kill the pcb. Assuming they're not using exclusively mag tape, CD/DVD type disk, and/or SSDs.[/QUOTE] Heat will destroy the platters just fine.
[QUOTE=F.X Clampazzo;52638389]Generally black smoke indicates plastics or other petrol products burning. They're probably burning more than just paper documents there.[/QUOTE] I'm guessing laminated paper, plastic stationary, ID cards, CDs, etc. I could imagine a lot of the burnt material are mostly private documents for Russian expatriates and internal documents. Stuff that should be kept private for the sake of professionalism and generally are not useful outside the country. A boring conclusion tends to be the more likely conclusion.
[QUOTE=FalconKrunch;52637853]Is destroying sensitive documents when having to leave a building unusual? I can imagine that you don't want certain documents to leave the safety of lock-up, or lose sight of them while moving so burning them is the only way to keep the information safe.[/QUOTE] they sure as hell picked the hottest fucking day to do it
[QUOTE=gman003-main;52638289]It is not unusual to destroy documents while moving or shutting down an embassy. Embassies deal with confidential stuff as a matter of course, and that's not even considering the spies that surely are among them. Also, standard practice is to shred, then burn. A lesson we learned after our embassy in Tehran was seized, and many shredded documents were pieced back together. With a sufficiently large team, shredded documents, even cross-shredded documents, can be reassembled; shredding is still done first as it is faster (so if emergency-purging everything, you at least force them to spend a lot of time putting it back together before getting anything useful if they seize it before you can burn it) and whole paper sometimes doesn't burn completely, small fragments get caught in the updraft and sucked out, which can be bad if that document is sensitive enough. Plus, shredded paper burns faster.[/QUOTE] Germany also created technology to un-shred (hand-shredded) documents digitally (for reassembling the Stasi files).
-snip-
i have a feeling this wouldn't be in the news if it weren't for the implications
Sorry, you need to Log In to post a reply to this thread.