• Former Haiti President Dies
    7 replies, posted
[QUOTE] Haiti's former ruler Jean-Claude "Baby Doc" Duvalier has died of a heart attack in the capital Port-au-Prince, reports quoting official sources say. Duvalier was just 19 when in 1971 he inherited the title of "president-for-life" from his father, the notorious Francois "Papa Doc" Duvalier. He was accused of corruption, human rights abuses and repression in his rule, which ended in a 1986 uprising. After years of exile in France, he returned to Haiti in 2011. [/QUOTE] [url]http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-29492262[/url]
Sounds more like a dictator. And not a good one at that.
The only good dictator is a dead dictator. Good riddance.
[QUOTE=download;46149103]The only good dictator is a dead dictator. Good riddance.[/QUOTE] [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B3zef_Pi%C5%82sudski"]Poland had a good dictator once![/URL]
[QUOTE=proch;46149419][URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C3%B3zef_Pi%C5%82sudski"]Poland had a good dictator once![/URL][/QUOTE] Weird, didn't know he considered himself to be Lithuanian..
Me neither. Might have actually had an influence on his political views.
[QUOTE]In the Roman Republic the term "Dictator" did not have the negative meaning it has later assumed. Rather, a Dictator was a person given sole power (unlike the normal Roman republican practice, where rule was divided between two equal Consuls) for a specific limited period, in order to deal with an emergency. At the end of his term, the Dictator was supposed to hand power over to the normal Consular rule and give account of his actions – and Roman dictators usually did.[/QUOTE] [QUOTE]Still, even in the 19th Century, the term "Dictator" did not always have negative connotations. For example, the Italian revolutionary Garibaldi, during his famous Expedition of the Thousand in 1860, proclaimed himself "Dictator of Sicily", which did not prevent him from being extremely popular in Italian and international public opinion. His usage of the term was clearly derived from the original Roman sense – i.e., a person taking power for a limited time in order to deal with an emergency (in this case, the need to unite Italy) and with the task done Garibaldi handed over power to the government of Victor Emmanuel II of Italy. A few years later, during the Polish January Uprising of 1863, General Romuald Traugutt also bore the title of "Dictator" as an official and positive designation - possibly directly influenced by the then fresh example of Garibaldi. Garibaldi's case was, however, an exception. In general, the term "dictator" came to be a negative term, not a title used by rulers to call themselves but a term used by the foes of an oppressive ruler. Such was the case with Maximillien Robespierre, whose supporters knew him as "The Incorruptible", while his opponents called him "dictateur sanguinaire", French for "bloodthirsty dictator".[/QUOTE] [I] Something to think about...[/I] Anyways, why did France allow him in? They also let the Iranian ayatollah in for some time in the 70's And also Kim jong un was in Switzerland for university...what's up with that?
[QUOTE=godfatherk;46152489][I] Something to think about...[/I] Anyways, why did France allow him in? They also let the Iranian ayatollah in for some time in the 70's And also Kim jong un was in Switzerland for university...what's up with that?[/QUOTE] They saw them coming and surrendered.
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