• Iraqi Kurds vote in independence referendum [Results are in: YES]
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[IMG]http://www.aljazeera.com/mritems/Images/2017/9/18/0aa1e06064074247af81a87247d0994b_7.jpg[/IMG] [QUOTE]People in Iraq's autonomous region of Kurdistan are voting in an independence referendum, amid rising tensions and international opposition. Polls opened at 05:00 GMT with balloting also taking place in the disputed areas between the northern city of Erbil and the capital Baghdad, as well as the oil-rich province of Kirkuk, which is ethnically mixed. The central government in Baghdad, which strongly opposes the referendum, sought control of the region's international border posts and airports on Sunday, in anticipation of Monday's vote. Iraq's government has also called on foreign countries to stop importing oil from the Kurdish region and to deal with them instead. In a televised address on Sunday, Iraq's Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi warned of the dire consequences of the vote and vowed to never accept the disintegration of Iraq. "This is an unconstitutional decision against the social fabric of our citizens. We will not recognise the referendum, nor its results," Abadi said. "We will take follow-up steps to protect the unity of the country and the interests of every citizen living in a unified Iraq." Meanwhile, the President of Iraq's Kurdish regional government, Masoud Barzani, has defended the decision to hold the referendum. "Is it a crime to ask people in Kurdistan to express in a democratic way what they want to have for the future?" he asked in a speech on Sunday. The Kurdish leader also said he would seek talks with Iraq's central government on how to implement the outcome of the vote. "If we have a constructive dialogue, then we can give it even more time, in order to secure better relations between the Kurds and Baghdad," he said. About 2,065 polling stations are open for 10 hours. A total of 5.6 million people are eligible to vote in Kurdistan and other Kurdish-controlled areas in northern Iraq, according to the election commission. Voters will be asked: "Do you want the Kurdistan region and Kurdish areas outside the region to become an independent state?" Official results are expected by Tuesday. Al Jazeera's Hoda Abdel-Hamid, reporting from the Kurdish capital of Erbil, said despite the "tug of war" between the politicians, there is "an upbeat atmosphere". "The Kurds say that this is their time to express their opinion and to take their future into their own hands," she said. The Kurds are likely to approve the referendum, but the non-binding vote is not expected to result in any formal declaration of independence. The referendum has raised alarm in Iraq's neighbours - Turkey, Iran and Syria - over concerns it could encourage their own Kurdish minorities to break away. Turkey is home to the largest Kurdish population at an estimated 14 million. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said on Monday that Ankara would close the Habur border crossing with northern Iraq over the plebiscite and also threatened the Iraqi Kurds with blocking their key oil exports. "After this, let's see through which channels the northern Iraqi regional government will send its oil, or where it will sell it," Erdogan said in a speech at a forum in Istanbul. "We have the tap. The moment we close the tap, then it's done." Hundreds of thousands of barrels of oil a day flow through the pipeline in Turkey from the northern Iraq region. Meanwhile, Iran closed its border with northern Iraq's Kurdish region on Monday, the Foreign Ministry said. "At the request of Iraq, we have closed the airspace and ground borders with the Kurdish Regional Government," ministry spokesman Behram Qasimi said at a news conference in Tehran. A day earlier, Iran halted flights to airports in Iraqi Kurdistan at the request of the central government in Baghdad, the semi-official Fars news agency reported. Feisal al-Istrabadi, former Iraqi ambassador to the UN, said the Kurdish government risks throwing the region into turmoil for no clear gain. "For the Turks and the Iranians, but particulary for Turkey, this [referendum] is an existential threat," he told Al Jazeera, speaking from Bloomington, Indiana. "How Turkey will deal with an independently Iraqi Kurdistan, but deny their own Kurds independence is a problem requiring Solomonic wisdom." The United States and the United Nations have also condemned the referendum.[/QUOTE] [url]http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2017/09/iraqi-kurds-vote-independence-referendum-170925032733525.html[/url] Results are expected by tomorrow
Imagine if they vote no lol
I was wondering about that as well, but: [quote]Overall, the results indicate a win for the ‘yes’ vote: • YES: 52.9% • NO: 25.6% • UNDECIDED: 17.9% • NOT VOTING: 3.6% However, most people who responded as ‘undecided’ expressed a likelihood to vote ‘yes’ but they also indicated that they were monitoring the political situation closely, in case it deteriorated too much.[/quote] [url]http://www.kurdish-consultancy.com/polling-survey-on-the-upcoming-referendum-on-the-independence-of-kurdistan/[/url] But hey, who knows, will keep an eye on this.
Either way there won't be independent Kurdistan anytime soon.
Hopefully the Kurds are able to finally get a homeland of their own, they probably deserve it the most out of any displaced group of people in the MENA
i both expected this and don't necessarily like this, when the kurds became the bulwork against Isis it was pretty obvious they were going to demand their own state but man will it make things even harder in the middle east
God speed Kurds, let's hope things don't go to shit no matter the vote
[QUOTE=Potus;52715975]God speed Kurds, let's hope things don't go to shit no matter the vote[/QUOTE] I bet it will go all sorts of wrong
I've no idea what will happen if they actually declare independence on the back of this, whether other countries will recognise them, how Iraq will respond, how Turkey and other regional players will respond etc UDI wouldn't be legal but the facts on the ground make it hard for Iraq to do much about it unless they want to go to war with Kurdish forces
After all the assistance the Kurdish fighters gave to the war against ISIS in Iraq, they should have their backing, and ours. Turkey will be a big fucking problem for sure.
[QUOTE=Faunze;52716036]After all the assistance the Kurdish fighters gave to the war against ISIS in Iraq, they should have their backing, and ours. Turkey will be a big fucking problem for sure.[/QUOTE] After Turkey became a semi-dictatorial country, they just had to expect this, too.
[QUOTE=Mifil;52715660]Either way there won't be independent Kurdistan anytime soon.[/QUOTE] Not to advocate for more bloodshed in the slightest, but strategically now makes the most sense for them to try considering how destabilized Iraq is, because they're probably never going to succeed once everything returns to normal years after rebuilding occurs. (Especially since with Syria in a civil war, they simultaneously also have a small chance of absorbing the region containing the Syrian Kurds as well.)
[QUOTE=The Duke;52716426]Not to advocate for more bloodshed in the slightest, but strategically now makes the most sense for them to try considering how destabilized Iraq is, because they're probably never going to succeed once everything returns to normal years after rebuilding occurs. (Especially since with Syria in a civil war, they simultaneously also have a small chance of absorbing the region containing the Syrian Kurds as well.)[/QUOTE] Yes it might be the best chance for them to break free, but there are two problems: Turkey and Iran. If Kurdistan somehow becomes independent, I bet you one of those countries is gonna intervene.
[QUOTE=Mifil;52716445]Yes it might be the best chance for them to break free, but there are two problems: Turkey and Iran. If Kurdistan somehow becomes independent, I bet you one of those countries is gonna intervene.[/QUOTE] I'd bet Turkey honestly. Iran already has enough diplomatic trouble without attacking a western aligned state, Erdogan would probably get away with it.
[QUOTE=Mifil;52716445]Yes it might be the best chance for them to break free, but there are two problems: Turkey and Iran. If Kurdistan somehow becomes independent, I bet you one of those countries is gonna intervene.[/QUOTE] And Iraq, the country they'd actually be breaking away from
Whatever happens they're going to have to fight an independence war against Iraq and Turkey. That's probably the best chance the west will get to tell Erdogan to go fuck himself though.
[QUOTE=Taepodong-2;52716507]Whatever happens they're going to have to fight an independence war against Iraq and Turkey. That's probably the best chance the west will get to tell Erdogan to go fuck himself though.[/QUOTE] More likely we'll just stand by and watch as Iraq / Turkey annihilate Kurdish communities.
[URL="http://www.rudaw.net/RefLanding.aspx?pageid=329292"]93.29% of voters in Iraqi Kurdistan have voted [B]YES[/B].[/URL] [editline]25th September 2017[/editline] [t]https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/230750505012297728/362041220492427265/unknown.png[/t]
Free Kurdistan!!!
Turkey can rightfully fuck off the people have overwhelmingly decided.
Turkey and Iraq have both vowed violence if the result is independence. Turkey is a shithole and needs to be kicked out of NATO. So frustrating the west continues to let them do whatever they want to these people.
Turdogan should just do the world a favor and off himself i mean Kurdistan would eventually make a better EU country than the shithole that Turkey has become they'd probably be the closest thing to a modern, civilized nation that doesn't shit all over basic human rights in the entire fucking Middle East
kinda sad to see Iraq divided, but considering all the shit they got from Iraq's government, I guess it's for the better
Oh man imagine if the Kurds get some corridor to the sea, and then are invited into the NATO while the Turks are kicked the fuck out. If only. On topic: Man, I love middle eastern countries "ayyyyy British, French and Ottoman powers draw lines on the dirt and divide our people and put us in states that didn't represent us!" circa some 100 years later "If you Kurds gain your own state, WE KILL YOU"
Iraq Orders Kurdistan to Surrender Its Airports [QUOTE]ERBIL, Iraq — Iraq’s prime minister, angered by a vote on independence by his nation’s Kurdish minority, has given the country’s Kurdish region until Friday to surrender control of its two international airports or face a shutdown of international flights. Kurdish leaders in northern Iraq had antagonized Iraq, Turkey and Iran by holding the referendum on Monday. The results have not yet been announced, but the Kurdish Regional Government said on Tuesday that the vote had gone overwhelmingly in favor of independence from Iraq. A “yes” vote would not lead to an immediate declaration of independence for the semiautonomous region, but it would direct the regional government to begin the process of creating an independent state, including negotiating a separation with Baghdad. Iraqi officials have called the referendum unconstitutional and have refused to negotiate with the Kurdish leadership. The Iraqis fear losing a third of the country and a major source of oil should Kurdistan break away. Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said Tuesday that his government had decided to demand control of the airports because the referendum had “destabilized” the region. He said humanitarian and other “urgent” flights would be exempt from the ban. Referring to the Kurdish leadership, he added, “Unfortunately, some have tried to weaken Iraq and be stronger than the state.” “We are partners in this country, and the partnership means we work together and don’t carry out unilateral decisions that lead to division and conflict and weakness,” Mr. Abadi said. There was no immediate response by leaders of the Kurdistan Regional Government. In an address in Erbil on Tuesday night, Massoud Barzani, the region’s president, referred indirectly to Mr. Abadi’s ultimatum. “We ask the Baghdad government not to threaten the Kurds because of the referendum,” he said. He urged the Iraqi government to enter negotiations and to respect what he said was the will of the Kurdish people to seek a nation of their own. He added that the referendum had been approved by a wide margin, though he did not provide figures. The Kurdish authorities are expected to announce the vote results on Wednesday. Turkey and Iran fear that a move toward independence by the Iraqi Kurds will inflame separatist fervor among their countries’ Kurdish minorities. Videos on social media showed Kurds in at least two Iranian cities celebrating the Iraqi Kurds’ vote. The United States also opposed the vote, worried that it could set off ethnic conflict, break up Iraq and undermine the American-led coalition against the Islamic State. Both Turkey and Iran have threatened sanctions against the Kurdish region, including the closing of border crossings. Turkish and Iraqi troops are conducting military exercises on Iraq’s northern border near Kurdistan, and Iranian forces are carrying out similar maneuvers on Iraq’s eastern border. Turkey’s president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, said Tuesday that Kurdistan’s action risked provoking a wider conflict, and he warned that Kurds would go hungry from a trade blockade with Turkey. “If Barzani and the Kurdish Regional Government do not reverse this mistake as soon as possible, they will go down in history with the shame of taking the region into an ethnic and sectarian war,” he said in a televised speech from Ankara. The Kurdish regional government, which has its own parliament and military force, operates international airports in its capital, Erbil, and in the northern city of Sulaimaniyah. There is no domestic Kurdish airline in the autonomous region. Iraq asked other countries last week to halt flights into the Kurdish region, but only Iran complied.[/QUOTE] [url]https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/26/world/middleeast/iraq-kurds-independence.html?mcubz=3[/url] Shits going down before the results are even fully counted
Disgusting. I wasn't expecting that from the US towards one of the most effective ground forces in the fight against ISIS who held the initial onslaught at bay. I hope that behind everything, they are actually in fact moving and acting in behalf of the Kurds.
[QUOTE=Cutthecrap;52721237]Disgusting. I wasn't expecting that from the US towards one of the most effective ground forces in the fight against ISIS who held the initial onslaught at bay. I hope that behind everything, they are actually in fact moving and acting in behalf of the Kurds.[/QUOTE] Haha, not a chance in hell, I'm afraid. It wouldn't be the first time the US and UK have sat on their hands and let an ally get shafted for the 'greater stability' of the Middle East.
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