• Voyager 1, Moving Ever Closer to Solar System's Edge, Hit By Rapidly Increasing Amounts of Cosmic Ra
    82 replies, posted
[QUOTE]For at least a year now, NASA has been waiting with bated breath for Voyager 1 to pass through the boundary of our solar system and become our first emissary to the stars. It’s been cruising the edge for some time, but when it finally leaves forever, it won’t be a satisfyingly clear punch-through — so it’s hard to say exactly when this will happen. Or happened. Now the spacecraft is in another strange new zone, where the influx of cosmic particles has been ramping up by the week. These particles mean Voyager 1 is at the frontier, according to project scientist Ed Stone, who has been working with the spacecraft since it and its twin launched in 1977. Voyager 1’s high-energy telescopes are watching charged particles, created when distant stars went supernova. Some of these particles make their way into our solar system, riding along magnetic currents that bring them in toward the sun and us, but for the most part the sun deflects them. Now it is deflecting fewer and fewer at the spacecraft's location 11.1 billion miles from home. Voyager's radio signals take 16 hours and 38 minutes to reach Earth. [B]From January 2009 to January 2012, the spacecraft noticed a gradual 25 percent increase in these cosmic rays. Then starting on May 7, the cosmic ray hits started going up — 5 percent in a week, and 9 percent in a month, NASA says. That’s a sign that Voyager is almost away from the sun’s sphere of influence.[/B] It’s even possible that it’s already gone. Scientists are still crunching two other sets of numbers that will help prove it: The magnetic field surrounding the spacecraft, which will switch directions when it exits, and the amount of solar particles blown out by the sun, which has dropped but hasn’t stopped. It’ll be a historic moment when that finally happens — or when the numbers show that it already has.[/QUOTE] Source: [url]http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2012-06/voyager-1-sniffs-increasing-amounts-cosmic-rays-moving-ever-closer-solar-systems-edge[/url] Push on, Voyager
Cool now find us some Reapers
[img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/26617987/the-little-engine-that-could.jpg[/img] [I]I think I can I think I can I think I can...[/I]
Hearing any news about Voyager is amazing. That tin can is still working, 35 years later.
Ever since I first heard of its mission my greatest fear has been that the Voyager would encounter a problem that destroys it. After all that time and hope of greater understanding I think it would be a real blow to humanities morale if it were to suddenly go silent forever.
[QUOTE=Axznma;36392658]Ever since I first heard of its mission my greatest fear has been that the Voyager would encounter a problem that destroys it. After all that time and hope of greater understanding I think it would be a real blow to humanities morale if it were to suddenly go silent forever.[/QUOTE] Even if the electronics on it fail, it still carries that plaque of humanity of where it's from on it. It will float, forever, in space even in silence carrying that proof that we are here.
I love hearing about space in the news.
This will be an achievement when we get out of the solar system
[QUOTE=Axznma;36392658]Ever since I first heard of its mission my greatest fear has been that the Voyager would encounter a problem that destroys it. After all that time and hope of greater understanding I think it would be a real blow to humanities morale if it were to suddenly go silent forever.[/QUOTE] Its doomed to happen. All these particles that are hitting it will eventually destroy it.
[QUOTE=PC_Paul;36392684]I love hearing about space in the news.[/QUOTE] Pretty much why I post a lot of Popular Science articles. Half the stuff I post from there I don't even really understand, but science and it's cool stuff has always been something everyone on FP enjoys.
I still hope that someday when we have the technology we can send a ship out there to put Voyager in a museum, so that everyone can see the most reliable probe ever created.
[QUOTE=_Kent_;36392855]I still hope that someday when we have the technology we can send a ship out there to put Voyager in a museum, so that everyone can see the most reliable probe ever created.[/QUOTE] I want the mars rovers back home. Their famous.
[QUOTE=areolop;36392866]I want the mars rovers back home. Their famous.[/QUOTE] Let's build museums around all the landers/rovers that we've put on the moon/mars/elsewhere when we colonize it. Build a big glass box around it as best as you can without messing up the area.
What if we found out there was a huge barrier around the solar system we couldn't possibly get past. [video=youtube;e5kW74Er_4o]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e5kW74Er_4o[/video] Like what happened at the end of this episode. That would be a buzzkill.
Voyager 1: Vehicle destroyed, collided with dark matter object.
[QUOTE=S31-Syntax;36393072]Voyager 1: Vehicle destroyed, collided with dark matter object.[/QUOTE] I think the entire science community would shit a log.
[QUOTE=S31-Syntax;36393072]Voyager 1: Vehicle destroyed, collided with dark matter object.[/QUOTE] technically speaking, dark matter is non-tangible
[QUOTE=apurplerock;36393091]technically speaking, dark matter is non-tangible[/QUOTE] technically speaking, dark matter can do whatever the fuck it wants [i]it's fucking dark matter[/i]
I was actually referencing Shores of Hazeron, a space exploration game where if you have a craft that lacks either a player character or a special Officer character leave a solar system, it would be destroyed instantly by a collision with a "dark matter object"
[QUOTE=areolop;36392733]Its doomed to happen. All these particles that are hitting it will eventually destroy it.[/QUOTE] Voyager is being hit with subatomic sized particles, it's not like the probe is being pummeled with rocks or something. The particles are just gonna bounce off the metal case. Worst case scenario it breaks something electronic but that hasn't happened yet in all the abuse it's withstood from the Sun.
[QUOTE=Emperor Scorpious II;36392682]Even if the electronics on it fail, it still carries that plaque of humanity of where it's from on it. It will float, forever, in space even in silence carrying that proof that we are here.[/QUOTE] Until it crashes into a planet or something
[QUOTE=DaFreshLemon;36393301]Until it crashes into a planet or something[/QUOTE] Praying it's a planet full of life.
[QUOTE=Emperor Scorpious II;36392682]Even if the electronics on it fail, it still carries that plaque of humanity of where it's from on it. It will float, forever, in space even in silence carrying that proof that we are here.[/QUOTE] You're thinking of the Pioneer Plaque. Voyager holds, instead, the Voyager Golden Record.
voyager is awesome (cassini too) [url]https://vimeo.com/40234826[/url]
[QUOTE=Elecbullet;36393355]You're thinking of the Pioneer Plaque. Voyager holds, instead, the Voyager Golden Record.[/QUOTE] since someone will ask [quote][url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Voyager_Golden_Record][img]http://i.imgur.com/eYBS9.gif[/img][/url][/quote]
And suddenly it will bump into an outer space horrorterror.
[QUOTE=Elecbullet;36393355]You're thinking of the Pioneer Plaque. Voyager holds, instead, the Voyager Golden Record.[/QUOTE] Still something, at least.
Voyager is so freaking awesome! And on top of that it makes me want to watch Star Trek Voyager every time I hear about our awesome bucket of bolts.
I wonder how much longer before the little guy starves and goes offline due to lack of sunlight :(.
[QUOTE=Panthereye;36393374]voyager is awesome (cassini too) [url]https://vimeo.com/40234826[/url][/QUOTE] AWESOME [editline]19th June 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=dark soul;36393557]I wonder how much longer before the little guy starves and goes offline due to lack of sunlight :(.[/QUOTE] There was a post earlier detailing the shut off sequences that will help it stay online for about 20 more years.
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