• Are There Traffic Laws in Space Yet?
    40 replies, posted
[QUOTE]Only a few. Right now, the roughly 20,000 man-made objects orbiting the Earth are less regulated than the cars on a morning commute. Satellites are usually on a fixed path, so the traffic control comes prelaunch. Most can move slightly to maintain orbit, but only a few can maneuver on short notice to avoid a collision. Satellite operators make sure they know where other space objects are so that none come close enough to collide. The International Telecom Union, a United Nations agency, assigns satellites slots in a geosynchronous orbit 22,000 miles above Earth. Operators must agree to follow ITU rules and to register the orbit, broadcast frequency and purpose of their satellite. Satellite owners also register an “end of life” plan, usually giving a nonfunctioning satellite a boost into an internationally recognized “graveyard orbit.” Other launches, like those for space shuttles, don’t need any international body’s approval but often need national clearance, such as an FAA license. Most space agencies recognize the value of staying out of one another’s way, though, and register launches with the U.N. Office for Outer Space Affairs, which keeps track of an estimated 93.5 percent of all functional space objects, including about 3,600 active satellites. The current system usually works. The only satellite collision on record is a 2009 bang-up between Russian and American satellites in low Earth orbit.[/QUOTE] Source: [url]http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2012-05/fyi-are-there-traffic-laws-space-yet[/url]
Shit imagine the ticket for a collision.
Is there any particular reason as to why they're all at the same height? Would they be flung out if they were put up higher? Would they fall back more quickly if they were lower? Also, why raise them to a “graveyard orbit” rather than forcing them down into the ocean?
[QUOTE=Dysgalt;36266815]Shit imagine the ticket for a collision.[/QUOTE] Just imagine the speeding tickets [editline]9th June 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=Janus Vesta;36266848]Is there any particular reason as to why they're all at the same height? Would they be flung out if they were put up higher? Would they fall back more quickly if they were lower? Also, why raise them to a “graveyard orbit” rather than forcing them down into the ocean?[/QUOTE] I would suspect that that specific height that they're all at is the most optimal for being far enough not to fall in but close enough to have good signals.
You were travelling 3 times over the speed of sound, sir.
[QUOTE=Janus Vesta;36266848]Is there any particular reason as to why they're all at the same height? Would they be flung out if they were put up higher? Would they fall back more quickly if they were lower? Also, why raise them to a “graveyard orbit” rather than forcing them down into the ocean?[/QUOTE] This is to make sure the satellites remain in the same place, relatively to the earth. i.e. The time of 1 orbit of the satellites is as long as the time the earth need to rotate once. further reading: [url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geosynchronous_orbit[/url]
[QUOTE=fruxodaily;36266874]You were travelling 3 times over the speed of sound, sir.[/QUOTE] "This is much too slow, you're causing danger to those around you"
"Thank you for calling, my name is Syntax, how can I help you?" 'Yeah I got a ticket I'd like to pay' "And what region of space was the ticket filed in?" 'I got my citation number, would that help?' "No, sir, I have to know exactly which space station this is in before i can proceed" 'If I gave you my social would you be able to find it?' "...no." Life wouldn't be much different for me if they had tickets in space, although my company would make a killing processing those.
[QUOTE=Emperor Scorpious II;36266851]Just imagine the speeding tickets [/QUOTE] "Your tail light is out"
[QUOTE=Ninja Duck;36267233]"Your tail light is out"[/QUOTE] You know how there are those movie cops who trash a dude's tail light just to be a dick? Imagine that, but in space. Railguns.
[QUOTE=Janus Vesta;36266848]Is there any particular reason as to why they're all at the same height? Would they be flung out if they were put up higher? Would they fall back more quickly if they were lower? Also, why raise them to a “graveyard orbit” rather than forcing them down into the ocean?[/QUOTE] If they aren't at that height (and at the right speed) they aren't in a geosynchronous orbit, which means they move around the earth making it harder to point at. You get some lower but they aren't good for certain things (such as receiving TV through). As for the graveyard orbit thing, I have always wondered this. I assume its more dangerous to attempt to bring it back to earth then it is just to move it out of the way. Might also require more fuel.
Sir are you sure you had no alcohol? Orbit in a geosynchronous orbit for me please.
'Sir I don't give a shit about no vacuum, get out of the vehicle'
[quote]20,000 man-made objects orbiting the Earth[/quote] Holy fucking shit.
You know, this makes me wonder why we haven't solved our garbage problem by simply [B]launching it all into the sun.[/B] Think about it. If we could get it to the edge of the earth's gravitational pull, it'd work just fine, and it'd be a really handy incinerator. Also, being a garbage man would be a lot cooler.
"Do you have any idea how fast you were orbiting?"
[QUOTE=Groat;36267965]You know, this makes me wonder why we haven't solved our garbage problem by simply [B]launching it all into the sun.[/B] Think about it. If we could get it to the edge of the earth's gravitational pull, it'd work just fine, and it'd be a really handy incinerator. Also, being a garbage man would be a lot cooler.[/QUOTE] It would cost too much.
The space around the solar system is too large for there to be a need for traffic laws.
[QUOTE=Daniel Smith;36268161]The space around the solar system is too large for there to be a need for traffic laws.[/QUOTE] Given how messy and trashy we are, I'm sure once we really kick start interplanetary colonization, what's around the Earth in terms of debris will envelop the entire system :v:
Do you fly on the right side or the left side of space?
[QUOTE=Thlis;36268203]Do you fly on the right side or the left side of space?[/QUOTE] More like do you fly on the Z axis or Y axis of space? :v:
[QUOTE=Groat;36267965]You know, this makes me wonder why we haven't solved our garbage problem by simply [B]launching it all into the sun.[/B] Think about it. If we could get it to the edge of the earth's gravitational pull, it'd work just fine, and it'd be a really handy incinerator. Also, being a garbage man would be a lot cooler.[/QUOTE] It costs between $3,000 and $12,000 per pound to get into LEO. That's an insane price to pay for garbage disposal.
[QUOTE=yawmwen;36268333]It costs between $3,000 and $12,000 per pound to get into LEO. That's an insane price to pay for garbage disposal.[/QUOTE] Maybe we can toss the idea to Space X
[QUOTE=Emperor Scorpious II;36268356]Maybe we can toss the idea to Space X[/QUOTE] I doubt it will ever be cost effective with our current method of getting into space. If we had a space elevator, or some other way to get the ship into space without having to spend a shit load of fuel just to get it up there, the costs would be relatively negligable. So maybe we should toss the idea for a space elevator to Space X.
"Ooo play it cool, play it cool. Here come space cops, [I]here come space cops...[/I]"
[QUOTE=timman;36268617]"Ooo play it cool, play it cool. Here come space cops, [I]here come space cops...[/I]"[/QUOTE] "Sir, if I searched your vehicle - I need you to tell me now - I won't find any illegal contraband, correct? No Romulan Ale?"
I never knew we had 20,000 satellites up there.
[QUOTE=Groat;36267965]You know, this makes me wonder why we haven't solved our garbage problem by simply [B]launching it all into the sun.[/B] Think about it. If we could get it to the edge of the earth's gravitational pull, it'd work just fine, and it'd be a really handy incinerator. Also, being a garbage man would be a lot cooler.[/QUOTE] Not only would it cost way too much, but it wouldn't help matters by any means. There isn't anything wrong with garbage, we just don't properly recycle most of it. So there is a lot of natural resources going to waste yearly, taking up more and more space, and the only concern the government will ever have (until it's too late) is "How much will it cost to dig a new hole for X?". And the answer will always be "Cheaper than any other option, do it."
[QUOTE=Corey_Faure;36268699]I never knew we had 20,000 satellites up there.[/QUOTE] I believe that a lot of the debris (or most of it) is from spent rocket stages, because when they launch a rocket, the stages detach once they're out of fuel, leaving them orbiting the Earth until they degrade, which would take decades to happen naturally - if they were close enough to the atmosphere in the first place, which a lot of the stages weren't.
For those of you unfamiliar with orbital mechanics, The height of a circular orbit is determined by its speed. Disregarding decay from friction, your speed stays mostly constant once you reach orbit because changing speed means burning fuel. It's not that they would be flung out or fall if they were higher or lower (though lower would decay more quickly), it's that to maintain those heights they would have to be going faster or slower respectively. And then they wouldn't be geosynchronous anymore.
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