• Plant blooms after 30,000 years in permafrost
    41 replies, posted
[quote]A plant that last flowered when woolly mammoths roamed the plains is back in bloom.Biologists have resurrected a 30,000-year-old plant, cultivating it from fruit tissue recovered from frozen sediment in Siberia. The plant is by far the oldest to be brought back from the dead: the previous record holder was a sacred lotus, dating back about 1200 years. The late David Gilichinsky from the Soil Cryology Laboratory in Moscow, Russia, and colleagues recovered the fruits of the ice age flowering plant ([URL="http://eol.org/pages/5200872/overview"][I]Silene stenophylla[/I][/URL][I]) from a fossilised squirrel burrow in frozen sediments near the Kolyma river in north-east Siberia. Radiocarbon dating of the fruit suggests the squirrel stashed it around 31,800 years ago, just before the ice rolled in.[/I] [I]By applying growth hormones to the fruit tissue, Gilichinsky and his colleagues managed to kick-start cell division and ultimately produce a viable flowering plant.[/I] [I]Modern day [I]S. stenophylla looks similar to the resurrected plant, but has larger seeds and fewer buds. Modern plants also grow roots more rapidly. Studying these and other differences will reveal how the plant has evolved since the last ice age.[/I][/I] [I][I][URL="http://www.adelaide.edu.au/acad/people/acooper_profile.html"]Alan Cooper[/URL], director of the Australian Centre for Ancient DNA at the University of Adelaide, is impressed but cautious, because some supposedly "ancient" plants grown from permafrost have turned out to be modern contaminants. To rule out this possibility, Gilichinsky's team went to some lengths to verify that the fruit came from undisturbed deposits, they say.[/I][/I] [I][I]"It is an exciting result and tells us we shouldn't just look for seeds when trying to generate ancient material," says Steven Penfield, a plant scientist at the University of Exeter in Colchester, UK.[/I][/I] [I][I]Similar fossilised burrows have been identified in Alaska and Canada. "If permafrost continues to melt, I would think it likely that a small fraction of ancient seeds will germinate, survive and grow spontaneously," says [URL="http://www.physics.berkeley.edu/research/faculty/Price.html"]Buford Price[/URL] from the University of California, Berkeley.[/I][/I][/quote] source: [URL]http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn21498-plant-blooms-after-30000-years-in-permafrost.html[/URL] [IMG]http://static1.hln.be/static/photo/2012/13/2/9/20120220212853/media_l_4640934.jpg[/IMG] It's beautiful.
rad
So it's like Jurassic Park but with plants instead of dinosaurs, neat.
[QUOTE=kirederf7;34791372]It's beautiful.[/QUOTE] Actually it looks like a weed, I would have no problem wiping my butt with it. The fact that 30,000 later it can still bloom is beautiful
Isn't this essentially creating/resurrecting life?
wow
I love how we went from 1200 year old plant as the oldest to be brought back, straight to a 30,000 year old one... Good luck beating that record! This is awesome.
HOLY FUCK
better late than never
That's actually a pretty good-looking flower.
Now turn it to plastic.
I want one, plant it everywhere in Norway and lick the tears off of Greenpeace.
[QUOTE=GoldenDargon;34791456]So it's like Jurassic Park but with plants instead of dinosaurs, neat.[/QUOTE] Just made this :v: [IMG]http://dl.dropbox.com/u/49828537/misc/plantpark.jpg[/IMG]
would be neat if it carried some jurassic bacteria with it....
now Lick is rating everyone late because he happened to know about this before
I bet it has a good taste.
Wasn't there an incredibly tiny bug that could do sort of this? It'd just collect up water from the nearby area, and because it was so tiny it could live off of that for a long time. Then it'd hibernate so the water would be consumed at an even smaller rate, and it could survive for a very long time like that. It was called a "water" something. Or at least, I think it was, I can't remember where I read about this. Anyways, this is very poetic of that plant. The plant itself isn't particularly good-looking, but it's sort of odd looking at it, how it's older than I'll ever be.
It's like Poison Ivy and Mr Freeze combined. [editline]20th February 2012[/editline] [QUOTE=Cone;34791749]Wasn't there an incredibly tiny bug that could do sort of this? It'd just collect up water from the nearby area, and because it was so tiny it could live off of that for a long time. Then it'd hibernate so the water would be consumed at an even smaller rate, and it could survive for a very long time like that. It was called a "water" something. Or at least, I think it was, I can't remember where I read about this. Anyways, this is very poetic of that plant. The plant itself isn't particularly good-looking, but it's sort of odd looking at it, how it's older than I'll ever be.[/QUOTE] waterbear?
No you fools, you've gone and played God! You've but your desires ahead of the natural order! YOU'LL RUIN EVERYTHING!
[QUOTE=kirederf7;34791672]Just made this :v: [IMG]http://dl.dropbox.com/u/49828537/misc/plantpark.jpg[/IMG][/QUOTE] [IMG]http://dl.dropbox.com/u/44722719/gilia.jpg[/IMG]
Amazing how something can freeze and still live to bloom. Not many plants/animals can do this.
[QUOTE=kirederf7;34791372]source: [URL]http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn21498-plant-blooms-after-30000-years-in-permafrost.html[/URL] "Radiocarbon dating of the fruit suggests the squirrel stashed it around 31,800 years ago, just before the ice rolled in." [IMG]http://static1.hln.be/static/photo/2012/13/2/9/20120220212853/media_l_4640934.jpg[/IMG] It's beautiful.[/QUOTE] Reminded me of this: [img]http://images.wikia.com/iceage/images/3/39/65.jpg[/img]
[QUOTE=Zenreon117;34792301]Reminded me of this: [img]http://images.wikia.com/iceage/images/3/39/65.jpg[/img][/QUOTE] I can totally see the recemblence.
I wonder how the plant can cope with todays levels of pollution
[QUOTE=aurum481;34792375]I wonder how the plant can cope with todays levels of pollution[/QUOTE] pretty easily because the world isn't that polluted
There's a zombie apocalypse joke here somewhere but I can't find it :|
[QUOTE=farmatyr;34792332]I can totally see the recemblence.[/QUOTE] He wasn't talking about the picture, he was talking about the quote. In the movie Ice Age, there was a squirrel who tried to stash his nut away to preserve it from the cold.
Smoke it and see what happens
Just looking at the damn thing makes me think of the time when it first grew.
[QUOTE=Funky Pickle;34792883]He wasn't talking about the picture, he was talking about the quote. In the movie Ice Age, there was a squirrel who tried to stash his nut away to preserve it from the cold.[/QUOTE] Funny, do you think maybe all squirrels do that?
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