• Raymond: "It's time to give our teenage medium a kick in the balls"
    61 replies, posted
[quote][url=http://www.gamesindustry.biz/articles/2012-05-14-raymond-its-time-to-give-our-teenage-medium-a-kick-in-the-balls][img]http://dl.dropbox.com/u/12875849/jotain/gamesindustry.png[/img][/url] [B]MD of Ubisoft Toronto says industry has responsibility to grow up and address issues [/B] Jade Raymond, the managing director of Ubisoft Toronto, has confessed she wants to see a shake up of subject matter for triple-A titles. And she's not alone. "More and more people come to me at Ubisoft and say, 'I love games. I came into this industry with so many ideas. But I can't continue to make shooters over and over again,'" Raymond told Eurogamer. "I have that meeting a lot these days. Yeah, it's time to give our teenage medium a kick in the balls." She admitted that as a parent she's probably not the target market for games anymore, but believes that at the moment the industry is underestimating its audience, and that they want more than explosions. "I don't know when we decided as an industry that in order to sell 5 million copies of a game you have to make a Michael Bay film" "It's time for our industry to grow up," she said. "Why is it that so many topics that are dealt with in other media are off limits or taboo in video games? Why can't we deal with the things that matter? I can think of so many examples of topics that could be interesting, issues that could be addressed in games or that could be integrated into existing big IP if we don't want to make them the centre of the experience." "It's our responsibility; doubly so for people like me who can make a difference, or push for something getting funded." She suggested topics like homelessness and sexism could easily be integrated into popular franchises like Call Of Duty, even if it wasn't the main subject matter. "I don't know when we decided as an industry that in order to sell five million copies of a game you have to make a Michael Bay film. There are other options." Ubisoft Toronto's first title is Tom Clancy's Splinter Cell Retribution. [/quote]
They say now, but when their "edgy idea" flops, they'll get the message that everyone else got. Is it wrong? Absolutely. But is it true? 100% Yes. Ubisoft then releases another Assassin's Creed game.
It's certainly not Ubisoft that's going to push the envelope. Besides they're already giving plenty of kick in balls with their shit DRM.
I think she's completely right about this particular issue
When I read the title I came in expecting scolding for not accepting the DRM. Good to see she means to scold the 'cool thing to do,' which is tacticool shit and such. I perfectly agree.
i imperfectly agree
[QUOTE] She suggested topics like homelessness and sexism could easily be integrated into popular franchises like Call Of Duty, even if it wasn't the main subject matter. [/QUOTE] I can't see that being successful. I do agree that the subject matter of a lot of big title games needs to change though.
HOMELESS SEXIST! New first person shooter from the studio that bought you Assassin's Creed, The Tom Clancy series and the Raymon series!
[QUOTE=jptalbert;35954575]I can't see that being successful. I do agree that the subject matter of a lot of big title games needs to change though.[/QUOTE] I don't even think it's the subject matter that is the problem. Sure, you can argue that it's getting stale but even an average video game story, war being the most common example, could be made a lot more mature and developed thematically. What I really agree with here is where she says [quote]I don't know when we decided as an industry that in order to sell 5 million copies of a game you have to make a Michael Bay film[/quote] And she's right in the sense that cramming as much "war stuff" and special effects into a game is how developers go about making video games now. What I'm getting at is that it's not really the subject matter that needs to evolve, it's the way writers and developers approach it. Warfare, a staple of video game plots, still has a lot of untapped writing potential (at least in the video game world). Very few games really explore it other than "this is a war and you are an elite soldier man guy now go kill all the enemy bad guys" when they could be doing so much more. What I don't agree with however is trying to shoehorn topics into stories that aren't related. If you want to make a game that has a story that involves homelessness or sexism by all means, go ahead, but if you try to tack that stuff onto an existing story it just wont end well.
A new splinter cell? Ooh!
games are just so fucking boring now when it comes to killing things. i find myself wanting to play the games that don't involve murder anymore just because i'm so bloody done with it.
so many AAA games are so fucking sexist, and when they make sequels to old franchises and such they make all preexisting female characters slutty
Came in expecting everybody love Raymond.
Fuck that apocalyptic scavenger game; i want to play as a hobo in NYC
Games should focus more on finding ways to tell stories in more interactive and original ways instead of making shooting galleries with Hollywood clichés. And there needs to be change but if terrible things sell I doubt AAA games will improve all that much.
Is this why Fisher in Conviction looked kind of homeless, and she says that as if people can just click their fingers and bam it's now in games and everyone loves it and it's a commercial success.
Sexism and homelessness in Call of Duty... eeehhh.
Perhaps this is why I really enjoyed Portal 2, like really enjoyed it, far more than anything I've played in quite a while.
I'd say Human Revolution touched on homelessness and poverty. I have trouble seeing how call of duty could manage it though. Homeless or not, people tend to do their best to get the hell out of a warzone.
People really didn't understand what she meant by incorporating sexism and homelessness into games like Call of Duty "[b]even if it wasn't the main subject matter[/b]". That's the important bit right here. If you want to show war, dare to show the effects. Don't make it revolve about romanticized foot soldiers displaying the masculinity power fantasy of a 12 year old. Let the medium grow up. Let games grow up with their audience. Homeless people and refugees as effects of war make perfect sense. Sexism, in a sufficiently dark setting (like, with war and a mature perspective and all), can easily be inserted into character backgrounds, regardless of whether the character in question is victim, offender or witness. It can open huge roads to personality and character development alike. If there's one thing I absolutely hate when discussing about a game's story or lack thereof, it's the counter "Who cares, it's just a game". Fuck you, sir. A game has no excuse to deliver a worse story than any other medium. None whatsoever. These tidbits demonstrate to me once more: I like UbiSoft's developers (especially whoever does the animations), but [i]that damned publishing department[/i]
I'd love to see more space exploration games. I've never seen one in AAA-format. That'd be brilliant. And I'm sure a diplomatic/political game could be great if well thought-out and done properly. Y'know, with some innovative thinking. But other then that, the world needs more innovation like for instance Dear Esther. Different stuff, clever stuff. Experimental stuff... except AAA. Oh, and exactly the stuff the guy above mentioned.
[QUOTE=mac338;35956795]I'd love to see more space exploration games. I've never seen one in AAA-format. That'd be brilliant. And I'm sure a diplomatic/political game could be great if well thought-out and done properly. Y'know, with some innovative thinking. But other then that, the world needs more innovation like for instance Dear Esther. Different stuff, clever stuff. Experimental stuff... except AAA. Oh, and exactly the stuff the guy above mentioned.[/QUOTE] I'd like to see a popular and better optimized space station 13.
I completly agree.
[QUOTE=Jade Raymond] "I don't know when we decided as an industry that in order to sell five million copies of a game you have to make a Michael Bay film. There are other options." [/QUOTE] This is exactly why I don't like the argument that gaming as a medium are somehow more immature than others. Why? Because they're emulating the much older, much more respected medium of movies. Call of Duty or Transformers say little about the state of their industries, more about the nature of the average consumer's mentality. The latter, to me, is more worrying.
but art movies and art music still compete on the mainstream market there's no gaming equal to Woody Allen's movies and his moves sell incredibly well [editline]14th May 2012[/editline] the real reason why games are usually just violent murder simulators: [media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wSBn77_h_6Q[/media] (this dude needs to make more videos, i think he's the only coherent game critic i've ever seen.)
[QUOTE=Spooter;35957250]This is exactly why I don't like the argument that gaming as a medium are somehow more immature than others. Why? Because they're emulating the much older, much more respected medium of movies. Call of Duty or Transformers say little about the state of their industries, more about the nature of the average consumer's mentality. The latter, to me, is more worrying.[/QUOTE] Well, see, it's a circular effect. If gaming as a whole were a more mature medium (or at least the front figures of gaming, such as Call of Duty) then it would attract more mature consumers, something it's fully capable of. But that requires a change or expanse in marketing from the whole generic shooter thing being predominant on all billboards and TV ads and any form of triple-A marketing.
[QUOTE=Marik Bentusi;35956733]People really didn't understand what she meant by incorporating sexism and homelessness into games like Call of Duty "[b]even if it wasn't the main subject matter[/b]". That's the important bit right here. If you want to show war, dare to show the effects. Don't make it revolve about romanticized foot soldiers displaying the masculinity power fantasy of a 12 year old. Let the medium grow up. Let games grow up with their audience. Homeless people and refugees as effects of war make perfect sense. Sexism, in a sufficiently dark setting (like, with war and a mature perspective and all), can easily be inserted into character backgrounds, regardless of whether the character in question is victim, offender or witness. It can open huge roads to personality and character development alike. If there's one thing I absolutely hate when discussing about a game's story or lack thereof, it's the counter "Who cares, it's just a game". Fuck you, sir. A game has no excuse to deliver a worse story than any other medium. None whatsoever. These tidbits demonstrate to me once more: I like UbiSoft's developers (especially whoever does the animations), but [i]that damned publishing department[/i][/QUOTE] I agree. This romanticized view of the the military is really bugging me. Most of my high school friends have signed up for the Marines, Army and Navy. Could you guess what their favorite game was? For once, I'd like to have a war game that actually depicted realistic war. How about innocent people being subjected to torture and torment? Art, music, culture and knowledge being stepped on for the sake of blood shed? Death and destruction. It's not always about the hero saving a whole country for the benefit of his people. Political dirty work involving governments and corporations letting the peasants kill each other for no apparent reason but for dick waving
Homefront
Wow she put that into words really well, it really is a teenage medium isn't it? It's going to go down the same path as comics and no one will ever take it seriously, unless developers try to make what they want and not what their marketing department wants. I think as the current audience ages the average gamer age will go way up and then it can become more like books and movies, where it can appeal to everyone.
[QUOTE=sHiBaN;35957385]I agree. This romanticized view of the the military is really bugging me. Most of my high school friends have signed up for the Marines, Army and Navy. Could you guess what their favorite game was? For once, I'd like to have a war game that actually depicted realistic war. How about innocent people being subjected to torture and torment? Art, music, culture and knowledge being stepped on for the sake of blood shed? Death and destruction. It's not always about the hero saving a whole country for the benefit of his people. Political dirty work involving governments and corporations letting the peasants kill each other for no apparent reason but for dick waving[/QUOTE] Lots of people would get mad to see war as it really is
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