• Florida is trying to make Kratom a Schedule 1 drug
    35 replies, posted
[quote]The Senate version of a bill that would put kratom on Florida’s list of Schedule I substances passed the Senate Committee on Criminal Justice by one vote on Tuesday. Sen. Jeff Clemens, D-Lake Worth, amended the bill to reduce the penalty for possession of kratom to a first degree misdemeanor to avoid unnecessarily imprisoning kratom users. Kratom, the leaf of a tree that grows in Southeast Asia, is in the same family as the coffee tree and has been used as an herbal drug. But it can produce opium-like effects, according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration. Bill Wohlsifer, the former Libertarian Party of Florida attorney general candidate, opposed the bill on the grounds that kratom does not meet the criteria for most Schedule I substances, particularly because the Florida Department of Health and the Florida Department of Law Enforcement had not judged the dangers of kratom, nor had any federal agencies banned it. “The state should look to the federal government for guidance when adding to the controlled substance list … to go from off the Schedule to Schedule I is a bit extreme,” Wohlfiser said. Schedule 1 substances have a high potential for abuse and have no currently accepted medical use. Some members of the law enforcement community, however, supported the bill. “It is our belief that the citizens of the state of Florida deserve the protection set forth under this bill,” a representative of the Broward Police Department said. The Senate version of the bill, SB 764, , filed by Sen. Greg Evers, R-Pensacola, has two more committee stops. The House version of the bill, filed by Rep. Kristen Jacobs, D-Coconut Creek, has not been heard by committee. Jacobs unsuccessfully pushed to ban kratom last year in her final weeks as a Broward County commissioner. HB 287 fulfills Jacobs’ campaign promise to file a bill banning the drug during the upcoming legislative session.[/quote] [url=http://postonpolitics.blog.palmbeachpost.com/2015/03/11/kratom-bill-narrowly-passes-first-committee/]Palm Beach Post[/url] Lets outlaw a plant guys because that has totally worked before!
Remember that time politicians learned from prohibition and the war on drugs? Yeah me neither, keep on running it into the ground guys.
Florida is always in the news...
[QUOTE=TheNerdPest14;47328236]Florida is always in the news...[/QUOTE] Especially the case when the source is Floridian...
[quote] amended the bill to reduce the penalty for possession of kratom to a first degree misdemeanor to avoid unnecessarily imprisoning kratom users.[/quote] At least there's that.
Kratom can actually help people get through drug rehabilitation.
i've never even heard of kratom before. i guess you learn something new every day.
[QUOTE=Quark:;47328590]i've never even heard of kratom before. i guess you learn something new every day.[/QUOTE] I foresee some Streisand Effect about to happen.
[QUOTE=Quark:;47328590]i've never even heard of kratom before. i guess you learn something new every day.[/QUOTE] It's a coffee plant which is known to have similar alkaloids to the poppy plant. At the moment, it's wiedly used in the drug rehabilitation community for getting off opiate painkillers and heroin, as like marijuana and kava, it can ease any harsh kicks from withdraws. For the most part it's used to make tea. Some people use it to make hot chocolate drinks or use it with protein shakes to ease pain while working out.
[QUOTE=Quark:;47328590]i've never even heard of kratom before. i guess you learn something new every day.[/QUOTE] Its because its commonly used in teas and rarely abused
correct me if im wrong, but im pretty sure kratom is a harmless nootropic?
A friend of mine who used to have a fondness for opiates uses this stuff. I've had the tea a couple of times, it's pretty good. Bitter as hell though.
[QUOTE=Eeshton;47328750]correct me if im wrong, but im pretty sure kratom is a harmless nootropic?[/QUOTE] It has alkhaloids such as [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/7-Hydroxymitragynine]7-hydroxymitragynine[/url] and [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mitraphylline]Mitraphylline[/url], both of which directly target your mu-opiate(mu-3?) receptors in your brain. All though it does produce a mild-high, it is namely used to get off opium derived drugs, as 7-Hydro and Mitraphylline will both lower withdraw pains such as headaches, stomach pain, ect.
[quote] according to the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.[/quote] how about we let any other drug testing agency besides the DEA determine the actual affects of drugs, after all this is the same agency that has disregarded the annual rescheduling and re-evaluation portions of the US's drug laws while cherry-picking data to bolster their own position (which is usually pro-scheduling)
[QUOTE=Eeshton;47328750]correct me if im wrong, but im pretty sure kratom is a harmless nootropic?[/QUOTE] it's sorta a mild opiate analogue from my understanding - "harmless" nootropic would be stuff like piracetam, theanine, bacopa, etc. kratom has far more noticeable effects than most other noots. Pretty stupid to ban it though, it has the abuse potential of chewing on poppy seeds or snorting nutmeg.
[QUOTE=Eeshton;47328750]correct me if im wrong, but im pretty sure kratom is a harmless nootropic?[/QUOTE] I'm trying to think of what you're confusing it with and coming up with blanks
[QUOTE=.Isak.;47328865]it's sorta a mild opiate analogue from my understanding - "harmless" nootropic would be stuff like piracetam, theanine, bacopa, etc. kratom has far more noticeable effects than most other noots. Pretty stupid to ban it though, it has the abuse potential of chewing on poppy seeds or snorting nutmeg.[/QUOTE] Not quite. AFAIK people have developed habitual use patterns with it but main downside is just opiate like withdrawal with constipation and itching. I had a few teaspoons one day last week via toss and wash and I got pretty high. I tend to take it occasionally one off rather than for multiple days in a row to avoid forming any kind of habituation as a precaution.
I personally don't care so much for Kratom, but I do like Kava/Kratom bars, which are very interesting compared to normal bars. They're both so mild I can't see why they are a problem. Let the burnouts burn themselves out and treat it as a health issue, not a criminal issue.
Meh, it's pretty bad for your liver. Don't fall into thinking it's harmless because it's a plant That said people should just make the informed decision for themselves
Can't remember where i heard this so it might be wrong, but basically the main reason behind drug prohibition is because, when the organization who oversaw the alcohol prohibition days was going to be dismantled when prohibition was amended, they invented a smear campaign against other psychoactive substances that had been in use for centuries, and lobbied the government to illegalize them, just so the organization could keep going, and keep getting funded, and the people running it could keep getting paid. The problem roots from giving the organizations who benefit from having more substances to fight the power to actually control the agenda on those substances with advertising campaigns and influencing government officials and representatives, allowing them to create more work for them thus increasing their funding. As long as the DEA are the organization the government looks to to tell them what to ban, more substances will get banned.
[QUOTE=CrumbleShake;47329397]Can't remember where i heard this so it might be wrong, but basically the main reason behind drug prohibition is because, when the organization who oversaw the alcohol prohibition days was going to be dismantled when prohibition was amended, they invented a smear campaign against other psychoactive substances that had been in use for centuries, and lobbied the government to illegalize them, just so the organization could keep going, and keep getting funded, and the people running it could keep getting paid. The problem roots from giving the organizations who benefit from having more substances to fight the power to actually control the agenda on those substances with advertising campaigns and influencing government officials and representatives, allowing them to create more work for them thus increasing their funding. As long as the DEA are the organization the government looks to to tell them what to ban, more substances will get banned.[/QUOTE] Alcohol Prohibition ended in the 1930s, "war on drugs" began in the early 1970s. There is theories that this was created for social warfare as a way to cull out the social movements that rocked the 1960s. The Bureau of Prohibition (Operated under the Department of Treasury) was disbanded, they went back to regulating alcohol. Became the ATF. Drugs, that was under the DEA. Which was probably initially true, but over the last 40 years it just seems now to be a grab for cash or something. heavily policed state, trying to tell people that they're criminals for taking a substance to get an effect off it.
[QUOTE=SirZoloft;47329504]Alcohol Prohibition ended in the 1930s, "war on drugs" began in the early 1970s. There is theories that this was created for social warfare as a way to cull out the social movements that rocked the 1960s. The Bureau of Prohibition (Operated under the Department of Treasury) was disbanded, they went back to regulating alcohol. Became the ATF. Drugs, that was under the DEA. Which was probably initially true, but over the last 40 years it just seems now to be a grab for cash or something. heavily policed state, trying to tell people that they're criminals for taking a substance to get an effect off it.[/QUOTE] Just looked into where I heard it from. They cite [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harrison_Narcotics_Tax_Act]this act[/url] as the beginning of the war on drugs. [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chasing_the_Scream]it was the author of this book[/url] but I can't find anything outside that book that connects the Bureau of Prohibition to the act so I dunno. Still, my point about allowing the organization who enforces prohibition to also influence the agenda on what to prohibit still stands.
[QUOTE=fox '09;47329179]I personally don't care so much for Kratom, but I do like Kava/Kratom bars, which are very interesting compared to normal bars. They're both so mild I can't see why they are a problem. Let the burnouts burn themselves out and treat it as a health issue, not a criminal issue.[/QUOTE] What do you mean by bars?
[QUOTE=fox '09;47329179]I personally don't care so much for Kratom, but I do like Kava/Kratom bars, which are very interesting compared to normal bars. They're both so mild I can't see why they are a problem. Let the burnouts burn themselves out and treat it as a health issue, not a criminal issue.[/QUOTE] That's all well and good until it's taxpayers money getting some addict off of drugs, a situation that could be potentially avoided. I'd be fine with people taking their drugs as long as they were made to pay for any health issues that appear because of it. You take it, it should be your problem, not the taxpayers'.
[QUOTE=Baron von Hax;47329723]That's all well and good until it's taxpayers money getting some addict off of drugs, a situation that could be potentially avoided. I'd be fine with people taking their drugs as long as they were made to pay for any health issues that appear because of it. You take it, it should be your problem, not the taxpayers'.[/QUOTE] Yeah but instead you're paying to lock them up for years at a time, along with food, medical, etc. AND on top of that, they can't have a job and pay taxes to lessen the load. So, you're treating this like its a choice between paying for their health care and paying for nothing, but that's not it at all.
Fucking dicks. Kratom isn't bad, but neither is pot. Fucking cocksuckers.
[QUOTE=Lick;47329190][b]Meh, it's pretty bad for your liver.[/b] Don't fall into thinking it's harmless because it's a plant That said people should just make the informed decision for themselves[/QUOTE][Citation needed] Seriously though, I've never heard this about Kratom so I'm interested to see a source.
It made me super horny... Wouldn't recommend. :dance:
[QUOTE=TehWhale;47336198][Citation needed] Seriously though, I've never heard this about Kratom so I'm interested to see a source.[/QUOTE] I suspect that the method of ingestion is what matters. If you take it by making kratom teabags, where no plant material resides in the drink after you take the teabag out, I don't believe your liver would get screwed up. On the other hand, if you make the kava-kratom cocktails that people like to make by mixing the powder and creating a thick muddy slime of a drink, then yeah, that'll screw up your liver no doubt.
I've seen people use kratom for years without issues while others experienced elevated liver enzymes. I have yet to find out why it affects certain people negatively.
Sorry, you need to Log In to post a reply to this thread.