• Most Americans Confused By Cloud Computing According to a Citrix Survey
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[url]http://www.zdnet.com/does-the-us-understand-cloud-computing-7000003291/[/url] [quote=Charlie Osborne of ZDNet]The average American consumer doesn't understand what cloud computing is or how it works, according to a national survey. The survey , undertaken by Wakefield Research and commissioned by cloud-technology firm Citrix, showed that many U.S. consumers believed it was weather-related, or something to do with pillows, drugs, heaven, outerspace and toilet paper. However, the research -- which included over 1,000 participants and was conducted this month -- did show that even when people did not fully understand cloud computing, they often recognized that it has economic benefits and can drive business growth. When asked what "the cloud" was, 29 percent said "a fluffy white thing", whereas only 16 percent connected the phrase with a network used to store, access and share data across Internet-connected devices. Cloud computing was found to be widely misunderstood. The survey found that: 51 percent of respondents, including a majority of Millennials, believe stormy weather can interfere with cloud computing. 95 percent are actually using cloud services today via online shopping, banking, social networking and file sharing, even though a third believe it to be a "thing of the future". 59 percent believe the "workplace of the future" will exist entirely in the cloud. However, those that want to appear more knowledgeable aren't against pretending. 22 percent admitted to feigning knowledge about cloud computing -- one third faking in the office and 14 percent during a job interview. Strangely enough, 17 percent pretended to know about cloud computing during a first date. Americans under 29 years of age were most likely to know what the cloud is and how it works (36 percent). In comparison, only 18 percent of those 30 or older had a functional knowledge of the cloud. 26 percent of the Gen-Y believe that the cloud could spur on job growth, whereas only 19 percent of Baby Boomers felt the same way. 54 percent of Americans claimed never to use cloud computing, although the majority don't realize that they do. The results found: 65 percent bank online, 63 percent shop online; 58 percent use social networking sites such as Facebook or Twitter, 45 percent have played online games, 29 percent store photos online, 22 percent store music or videos online, 19 percent use online file-sharing. Despite widespread use of services hosted on cloud computing platforms, the top three deterrents to using the cloud were cost (34 percent), security concerns (32 percent) and privacy worries (31 percent). Kim DeCarlis, vice president of corporate marketing at Citrix said: [quote=Kim DeCarlis]"This survey clearly shows that the cloud phenomenon is taking root in our mainstream culture, yet there is still a wide gap between the perceptions and realities of cloud computing, While significant market changes like this take time, the transition from the PC era to the cloud era is happening at a remarkable pace. The most important takeaway from this survey is that the cloud is viewed favorably by the majority of Americans, and when people learn more about the cloud they understand it can vastly improve the balance between their work and personal lives."[/quote] It seems that a number of Americans do enjoy the softer side of cloud computing. 40 percent enjoyed being able to use the cloud to work from home in their "birthday suit", 25 percent liked keeping embarrassing photos off their hard drives, and 33 percent enjoyed a sunbathe while accessing their files.[/quote]
[media]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ntPxdWAWq8[/media]
Something about keeping all my files, data, and programs on a corporate web server always stuck me as a bad idea.
I used the Goggles to search for information about the cloud, and now I know!
You upload a file. File stays on network. How is this complicated?
We're talking about people who might not realize that your files are still okay if your monitor breaks. "All of my songs are in the cloud? But there's a list of them right here on my phone!"
[QUOTE=Amiga OS;37457840]Well sure the weather would disrupt cloud computing. The fucking power & phone go out at my house with the slightest hint of a storm[/QUOTE] see that's why I'd tick that box it's technically true, the weather can fuck up everything
Because they us the term "cloud computing" for pretty much anything that uses the internet nowadays.
How is it hard at all to understand?
I've never trusted cloud computing, it doesn't seem like a good idea in my opinion to store all your personal files in something that condenses and rains all over the place. [editline]29th August 2012[/editline] It seems impractical and I don't want to see porn rainbows.
Citrix... They make using my computer at work a nightmare. I've probably made thousands of dollars thanks to how slow their stupid security system is. Thanks, Citrix!
Cloud computing is extremely risky. Who knows when those fuckers are going to turn into a tornado or disappear on a sunny day.
[quote]58 percent use social networking sites such as Facebook or Twitter[/quote] That cant be true. I would imagine it to be like 70 percent
I didn't trust cloud computing for the reason of loss of control. my first experience was with Steam cloud and I had no choice weather I used it or not.
Are people really this ignorant about stuff like this, when it's so prominent in our computer-based culture? It's 2012, not 1980's. Time to learn about that hot electro-facebook-box you're using.
[QUOTE=Glaber;37458456]I didn't trust cloud computing for the reason of loss of control. my first experience was with Steam cloud and I had no choice weather I used it or not.[/QUOTE] You can never choose the weather, you'll have to deal with it and watch the forecasts like everyone else.
[QUOTE=Glaber;37458456]I didn't trust cloud computing for the reason of loss of control. my first experience was with Steam cloud and I had no choice weather I used it or not.[/QUOTE] [img]http://puu.sh/103yy[/img]
[QUOTE=butters757;37458499][img]http://puu.sh/103yy[/img][/QUOTE] I have it disabled and somebody messed up my config file for a game, every time I manually try changing it or removing it steam cloud puts it back when the game starts up the way it was before (broken). I had to make it read only. It's annoying and dumb tbh.
Glabber's joke your heads
I blame Microsoft for their idiotic usage of "TO THE CLOUD" in their Windows 7 commercials.
[QUOTE=Mordi;37458235]Citrix... They make using my computer at work a nightmare. I've probably made thousands of dollars thanks to how slow their stupid security system is. Thanks, Citrix![/QUOTE] Citrix is a godsend for lots of applications that are made by morons. Only having to update a few servers at most to serve an application to hundreds of people is amazing. As an IT person it has made parts of my job 10x easier. There's definitely crappy things about it though, especially since it's just a remote desktop window around an application that has no access to local computer resources except mapped drives and printers.
[QUOTE=FrankOfArabia;37457815]Something about keeping all my files, data, and programs on a corporate web server always stuck me as a bad idea.[/QUOTE] Spoken like someone who has no understanding of what it actually is
[QUOTE=Glaber;37458456]I didn't trust cloud computing for the reason of loss of control. my first experience was with Steam cloud and I had no choice weather I used it or not.[/QUOTE] Well, it's Steam, so you know that it goes up and turns into a cloud It's simple and reliable!
Well considering I'm sure most people are confused about computers in general and really only know how to use them for Facebook, Youtube, and looking up silly meme's, it's not really surprising.
[QUOTE=leontodd;37457929]Because they us the term "cloud computing" for pretty much anything that uses the internet nowadays.[/QUOTE] Cloud computing is just the shiny new name for terminal based computing in the 80s.
[QUOTE=Glaber;37458456]I didn't trust cloud computing for the reason of loss of control. my first experience was with Steam cloud and I had no choice [B]weather[/B] I used it or not.[/QUOTE] I see what you did
[QUOTE=Mr. Someguy;37460705]I see what you did[/QUOTE] Haha very clever :)
It was a dumb question, only made to get as many 'dumb' answers as possible. They should've asked "What is cloud computing" instead of "What is the cloud"
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