• Dark Galaxies Discovered—May Be Cosmic "Missing Links"
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[URL]http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/07/120711-dark-galaxies-missing-link-evolution-science-space-universe/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ng%2FNews%2FNews_Main+(National+Geographic+News+-+Main)[/URL] [QUOTE][B]Eleven billion light-years away, strange, dark [URL="http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/space/universe/galaxies-article/"]galaxies[/URL] nearly devoid of [URL="http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/space/universe/stars-article/"]stars[/URL]have been finally spotted, according to a new study.[/B] Predicted in theory but never before observed, these elusive objects appear to be similar to today's galaxies in that they're rich in gas. However, without any stars to light the gas, the galaxies have remained hidden from view. For instance, without stars, the [URL="http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2010/12/milky-way/croswell-text"]Milky Way[/URL]'s famous, gas-rich Orion Nebula would be dark to our telescopes, said study leader Sebastiano Cantalupo, an astronomer at [URL="http://www.astro.ucsc.edu/index.html"]University of California, Santa Cruz[/URL]. To find these cosmic ghosts, Cantalupo and colleagues took advantage of one of the brightest light sources in the cosmos—a quasar known as HE0109-3518. A superbright galaxy 11 billion light-years away, the quasar shines with the power of a hundred trillion suns and can light up its galactic neighborhood to a radius of ten million light-years. Quasars are very distant galaxies that have actively feeding—and rapidly rotating—supermassive [URL="http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/space/universe/black-holes-article/"]black holes[/URL] at their hearts. Using the European Southern Observatory's [URL="http://www.eso.org/public/teles-instr/vlt.html"]Very Large Telescope[/URL] (VLT) in Chile, the astronomers took a very long exposure snapshot of the area surrounding the quasar and detected at least a dozen dark-galaxy candidates. Only by combining the light-gathering power and exquisite sensitivity of the VLT's four 8.2-meter telescopes could the team directly observe the dim galaxies. (See [URL="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2011/01/110114-galaxy-x-space-dark-matter-dwarf-satellite-science-chakrabarti/"]"Dark-Matter Galaxy Detected: Hidden Dwarf Lurks Nearby?"[/URL]) [B] "Missing Link" in Galaxy Evolution?[/B] Because of the time it takes light to travel from the dark galaxies to us, we're seeing the galaxies as they were 11 billion years ago. As such, the newfound galaxies may shed light on the evolution of the bright galaxies we see today, Cantalupo said. "We're looking at these dark objects as 'infant' galaxies when they were at their earliest stage of their evolution. [That's] when the properties of their gas—such as composition, density, or some still unknown parameter—weren't ideal to form stars," he said. "So these dark galaxies that we are now finally observing in the early universe are in a sense a missing link in the evolution of galaxies, and may in fact represent the 'building blocks' of our current bright galaxies we see today, including our own." (See [URL="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/01/100105-earliest-galaxies-hubble-deep-universe/"]"Earliest Known Galaxies Spied in Deep Hubble Picture."[/URL]) It's still a mystery how the stars form from the primordial gas in dark galaxies, but one possibility is that these galaxies remain dark until they become massive enough to ignite star formation or until they collide with each other. "In our current picture of galaxy formation, big galaxies might acquire a large fraction of their gas through cannibalism of smaller systems," Cantalupo said. "So in our case of small dark galaxies, they might have been essential to bring to their bright companions the gas necessary to feed their star formation." [/QUOTE]
[QUOTE]However, without any stars to light the gas, the galaxies have remained hidden from view.[/QUOTE] [IMG]http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/4697/pyrof.jpg[/IMG] A lot of cardboard....
But...it's not Dark matter, right?
[QUOTE=Del91;36732007]But...it's not Dark matter, right?[/QUOTE] Nope, just baby galaxies where no or few stars have been born yet.
This thread makes me want to play around with Space Engine.
[QUOTE=Del91;36732007]But...it's not Dark matter, right?[/QUOTE] did you even read the article? you mook they're galaxies without stars, just floating gas
[QUOTE=camacazie638;36731880][IMG]http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/4697/pyrof.jpg[/IMG][/QUOTE] [img]https://dl.dropbox.com/u/9330046/pyro.png[/img]
I know what this situation calls for [video=youtube;UpSHC1dqX1o]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UpSHC1dqX1o[/video]
Wow, I was reading the article and when I got to supermassive black hole, I whispered it in my head and said it along to the tune of the Muse song. Automatically. Without even missing a beat. Once I realized what I'd done, I thought "what the fuck?". Brain sure can be weird sometimes.
[quote]A superbright galaxy 11 billion light-years away, the quasar shines with the power of a hundred trillion suns and can light up its galactic neighborhood to a radius of ten million light-years. Quasars are very distant galaxies that have actively feeding—and rapidly rotating—supermassive black holes at their hearts.[/quote] Using a quasar as a fucking spotlight. That it one of the coolest things I have ever fucking heard of. Fuck yea science.
[QUOTE=camacazie638;36731880][IMG]http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/4697/pyrof.jpg[/IMG][/QUOTE] What the fuck does the pyro have to do with this?
A galaxy of gas, that's fucking incredible.
[quote]Using the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT)...[/quote] Really, that's the name they come up with for this telescope?
[QUOTE=Frisk;36734079]Really, that's the name they come up with for this telescope?[/QUOTE] My favorite quote from Neil Degrasse Tyson: "In Astrophysics, we call it like we see it. That thing there is small and brown, it's a brown dwarf. There is a red spot on Jupiter so we call it Jupiter's Red Spot. There are dark spots on the sun so we call them sun spots..."
[QUOTE=yawmwen;36734113]My favorite quote from Neil Degrasse Tyson: "In Astrophysics, we call it like we see it. That thing there is small and brown, it's a brown dwarf. There is a red spot on Jupiter so we call it Jupiter's Red Spot. There are dark spots on the sun so we call them sun spots..."[/QUOTE] Brilliant, why should it be any other way?
This is cool.
[QUOTE=Frisk;36734079]Really, that's the name they come up with for this telescope?[/QUOTE] There's already the Very Large Array, and they want to make a Very/Super Large Hadron Collider.
[QUOTE=Frisk;36734079]Really, that's the name they come up with for this telescope?[/QUOTE] better than "Big set of lenses used to peer into space" what did you expect, something like "INTERGALACTIC OBSERVATION DEVICE"
if always nown about them galacsies you're all to stupid to sea them
[QUOTE=Splut;36741549]if always nown about them galacsies you're all to stupid to sea them[/QUOTE] lolwhat.
So, how cold exactly would these galaxies be? I know it's out of the question that any life could possibly survive, just wondering though.
[QUOTE=J!NX;36742543]So, how cold exactly would these galaxies be? I know it's out of the question that any life could possibly survive, just wondering though.[/QUOTE] Not much warmer than deep space at a guess, if there's no stars and nothing to heat them up.
[QUOTE=camacazie638;36731880][IMG]http://img96.imageshack.us/img96/4697/pyrof.jpg[/IMG][/QUOTE] "I fear no man. But, that thing...[I] It scares me...[/I]"
[QUOTE=Falcqn;36749878]Not much warmer than deep space at a guess, if there's no stars and nothing to heat them up.[/QUOTE] still cold enough to freeze some gasses then (At least liquefy them, around -270.425 C or -454.765 F. [url]http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080521063444AA6K7te[/url] AKA Gas giants might be pretty solid.
derailed on first post good job Facepunch
[QUOTE=Neo Kabuto;36736826]There's already the Very Large Array, and they want to make a Very/Super Large Hadron Collider.[/QUOTE] Utterly Gigantic Hadron Collider.
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