• Federal judge throws out Texas' voter ID law
    26 replies, posted
[media]https://twitter.com/AP/status/900475423657734144[/media] [url]https://www.dallasnews.com/news/politics/2017/08/23/federal-judge-throws-texas-voter-law[/url] [quote]A federal judge in Corpus Christi has thrown out Texas' controversial voter identification law. In a court order Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Nelva Gonzales Ramos ruled that Texas' 2011 voter ID law, which was considered to be one of the strictest in the nation, was unconstitutionally discriminatory. The law, Ramos wrote, violated Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act, which prohibits discrimination, and the 14th and 15th amendments. Ramos' order blocked portions of the law from going into effect. In a particularly striking blow to the state, Ramos blocked entirely a revamp to the law that the state legislature had passed earlier this year. Almost immediately after the ruling became public, Attorney General Ken Paxton promised to appeal it, saying the revamp to the law had addressed discriminatory issues the court had found.[/quote]
First the bathroom bill didn't pass and now this. I want to say things in Texas might be turning around but I doubt it.
[QUOTE=MissingGlitch;52605743]First the bathroom bill didn't pass and now this. I want to say things in Texas might be turning around but I doubt it.[/QUOTE] theres nothing stopping them from passing something increadibly similar and claiming victory while it works its way through the courts again. this legislation is about rigging the elections, if it helps even one election then its worth it, same with the illegal district lines, judges are very leery about calling new elections so they usually let the existing rigged legislature stand.
Good. I've voted in Texas and in Minnesota and the difference was astonishing. In Texas, I had to register through mail a few months beforehand, [I]and[/I] bring photo ID plus proof of registration to the polling station. That was years ago now, so I don't remember all the details, but I remember it being a hassle that took me several hours to figure out. In Minnesota, I registered at the primaries and cast my vote with no ID and no proof of registration needed. Night and day. Absolute pain in the ass to exercise my right to vote in Texas.
[QUOTE=.Isak.;52606246]Good. I've voted in Texas and in Minnesota and the difference was astonishing. In Texas, I had to register through mail a few months beforehand, [I]and[/I] bring photo ID plus proof of registration to the polling station. That was years ago now, so I don't remember all the details, but I remember it being a hassle that took me several hours to figure out. In Minnesota, I registered at the primaries and cast my vote with no ID and no proof of registration needed. Night and day. Absolute pain in the ass to exercise my right to vote in Texas.[/QUOTE] Your experience in Minnesota is the same as it was for me here in New Mexico, where you'd think state legislators would've been stupid-paranoid about voter/ID fraud. But then again New Mexico tends to be fairly liberal when it comes to such things, as much of the state population lives in/near the capital/Albuquerque, both of which are a pretty solid blue. Of course now, you need a copy of your birth-certificate, two proofs of residence (utility bills) and your SS card just to get a driver's license here since November last year. :/
Here in Australia all I have to do is tell them my name and address which they check against a list and they let me vote. It's so strange to see people having to go through such a difficult process to vote.
[QUOTE=download;52606622]Here in Australia all I have to do is tell them my name and address which they check against a list and they let me vote. It's so strange to see people having to go through such a difficult process to vote.[/QUOTE] We have a fantastic voting system in general I feel. Far better than the majority of countries.
See the solution for the problem is quiet simple: Any state with closed/semi-closed election bollocks has to be kindly told to go fuck themselves[NY, AZ, TX, list goes on], and everyone becomes preregistered so long as they are an American citizen. Make it so people vote within their respective districts and are crossed off when they come and vote, and wooo, holy shit you fixed the problem of voter fraud, discrimination, and party bias on the county level in one fail swoop.
[QUOTE=Zelpa;52606630]We have a fantastic voting system in general I feel. Far better than the majority of countries.[/QUOTE] our system is perfectly fine, the incidents of actual deliberate fraud are exceedingly low, our voter ID laws are almost universally designed to target minorities
[QUOTE=JoeSkylynx;52606737]See the solution for the problem is quiet simple: Any state with closed/semi-closed election bollocks has to be kindly told to go fuck themselves[NY, AZ, TX, list goes on], and everyone becomes preregistered so long as they are an American citizen. Make it so people vote within their respective districts and are crossed off when they come and vote, and wooo, holy shit you fixed the problem of voter fraud, discrimination, and party bias on the county level in one fail swoop.[/QUOTE] Fixing voter fraud isn't really what the GOP wants. It isn't even a real issue here in Minnesota with how lax voting is, its just about disenfranchising voters.
[QUOTE=Saxon;52606811]Fixing voter fraud isn't really what the GOP wants. It isn't even a real issue here in Minnesota with how lax voting is, its just about disenfranchising voters.[/QUOTE] Minnesota still has a crap system compared to glorious North Dakota.
No matter what system is put into place you always have to ask "what is the best way to stop illegal immigrants from voting" when you consider screening people.
[QUOTE=Zero-Point;52606361]Your experience in Minnesota is the same as it was for me here in New Mexico, where you'd think state legislators would've been stupid-paranoid about voter/ID fraud. But then again New Mexico tends to be fairly liberal when it comes to such things, as much of the state population lives in/near the capital/Albuquerque, both of which are a pretty solid blue. Of course now, you need a copy of your birth-certificate, two proofs of residence (utility bills) and your SS card just to get a driver's license here since November last year. :/[/QUOTE] Driving is a privilege whereas voting is protected constitutionally. I imagine there was a run up of events that made the license process a bitch
[QUOTE=Code3Response;52608424]Driving is a privilege whereas voting is protected constitutionally. I imagine there was a run up of events that made the license prices a bitch[/QUOTE] Owning a firearm is protected constitutionally yet there are limits on who can own one e.g. Felons, Illegals. This should also apply to voting in my opinion seeing as you need to get screened anyway to purchase a firearm, you should be ID'd to vote on government positions to ensure illegals and felons (in some states) can't vote.
[QUOTE=ultra_bright;52608657]Owning a firearm is protected constitutionally yet there are limits on who can own one e.g. Felons, Illegals. This should also apply to voting in my opinion seeing as you need to get screened anyway to purchase a firearm, you should be ID'd to vote on government positions to ensure illegals and felons (in some states) can't vote.[/QUOTE] That'd be a great idea if voter ID laws weren't almost always a front for voter suppression and so these places deliberately make the IDs that you need to vote difficult or expensive to get.
[QUOTE=Helix Snake;52608992]That'd be a great idea if voter ID laws weren't almost always a front for voter suppression and so these places deliberately make the IDs that you need to vote difficult or expensive to get.[/QUOTE] It works here in Canada, I wonder why politics has gotten so bitter in the States over the past decade.
[QUOTE=Helix Snake;52608992]That'd be a great idea if voter ID laws weren't almost always a front for voter suppression and so these places deliberately make the IDs that you need to vote difficult or expensive to get.[/QUOTE] My state lets you apply for an ID through the mail, and lets you waive the fee if you can prove you are a "low income" resident. I thought every state had something like this?
[QUOTE=Helix Snake;52608992]That'd be a great idea if voter ID laws weren't almost always a front for voter suppression and so these places deliberately make the IDs that you need to vote difficult or expensive to get.[/QUOTE] That's just not true. It might be hard to get one if you wait until 2 weeks before the election, but generally it's super easy and costs like ~$0-30. Texas offers them for free.
[QUOTE=ultra_bright;52609073]It works here in Canada, I wonder why politics has gotten so bitter in the States over the past decade.[/QUOTE] Because we have huge swarms of people so fucking morally bankrupt that they'd rather destroy democracy than give a political party they disagree with a chance to get into power [editline]24th August 2017[/editline] [QUOTE=sgman91;52610302]That's just not true. It might be hard to get one if you wait until 2 weeks before the election, but generally it's super easy and costs like ~$0-30. Texas offers them for free.[/QUOTE] [url]https://thinkprogress.org/this-is-how-hard-it-is-to-get-a-voter-id-in-wisconsin-8be821ef8a88/[/url] [url]https://rewire.news/ablc/2014/10/16/well-actually-pretty-hard-people-get-photo-id-just-vote/[/url] [url]https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/courts_law/getting-a-photo-id-so-you-can-vote-is-easy-unless-youre-poor-black-latino-or-elderly/2016/05/23/8d5474ec-20f0-11e6-8690-f14ca9de2972_story.html?utm_term=.0f8f5a97b0b4[/url] [url]http://www.brennancenter.org/publication/challenge-obtaining-voter-identification[/url] [url]https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/03/the-hard-power-of-soft-voter-id-laws/473595/[/url] I literally just searched "how hard is it to get a voter ID" and these were the first 5 results
[QUOTE=Helix Snake;52610469][URL]https://thinkprogress.org/this-is-how-hard-it-is-to-get-a-voter-id-in-wisconsin-8be821ef8a88/[/URL] [URL]https://rewire.news/ablc/2014/10/16/well-actually-pretty-hard-people-get-photo-id-just-vote/[/URL] [URL]https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/courts_law/getting-a-photo-id-so-you-can-vote-is-easy-unless-youre-poor-black-latino-or-elderly/2016/05/23/8d5474ec-20f0-11e6-8690-f14ca9de2972_story.html?utm_term=.0f8f5a97b0b4[/URL] [URL]http://www.brennancenter.org/publication/challenge-obtaining-voter-identification[/URL] [URL]https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2016/03/the-hard-power-of-soft-voter-id-laws/473595/[/URL] I literally just searched "how hard is it to get a voter ID" and these were the first 5 results[/QUOTE] So we have: 1) ThinkProgress... an unabashedly super left wing biased website. 2) A pay wall 3) "Angry Black Lady Chronicles" blog post 4) A survey that doesn't prove what you are trying to make it prove. It shows, at most, that 11% of the population don't have a valid ID, not that those 11% couldn't get an ID easily or that those 11% would vote anyway. 5) A series of anecdotes. Did you actually read them, or did you just read the headlines?
[QUOTE=ultra_bright;52609073]It works here in Canada, I wonder why politics has gotten so bitter in the States over the past decade.[/QUOTE] I didn't need voter ID in the last general election? I voted in BC.
[QUOTE=sgman91;52610302]That's just not true. It might be hard to get one if you wait until 2 weeks before the election, but generally it's super easy and costs like ~$0-30. Texas offers them for free.[/QUOTE] Is it no big deal, or is it an unconstitutional attempt at voter suppression, like this federal judge says it is? Spoiler: it's what the judge says, since they have the final ruling on constitutionality. There is no comparison between my voting experiences in MN and TX. I only had to dig out my fucking [I]birth certificate[/I] in one of those states for a secondary form of ID - and it definitely wasn't MN. Note that in Texas you need [I]both[/I] a voter registration card and a valid form of ID. I'm lucky I had a passport. I mean, shit, when I got my license I needed my birth certificate (plus consular report of a birth abroad), 2 forms that provided proof of residency dated within a few months (electric/water bill, etc), my physical SSN card, and loads of other shit. It also took me [I]seven hours[/I] waiting in the DMV to even [I]make an appointment[/I] for my driving test - arrived at 6am and didn't get helped until 1pm. There was a lady in front of me getting a photo ID, not a license, and she had to wait almost as long as I did. What if you can't get off work to wait in the DMV to go get a picture taken and printed on an ID? What if you don't have a license, want a picture ID, but you can't get a ride to/from the DMV on your day off? Tough shit, you [B]can't vote[/B]. It's blatant voter suppression and it's now been ruled discriminatory [I]five times[/I]. It's transparently not an attempt to prevent voter fraud, it's to make voting a hassle as much as possible. Other states do this perfectly fine without forcing you to jump through hoops to exercise your constitutional right to vote.
[QUOTE=.Isak.;52612284]Is it no big deal, or is it an unconstitutional attempt at voter suppression, like this federal judge says it is? Spoiler: it's what the judge says, since they have the final ruling on constitutionality. There is no comparison between my voting experiences in MN and TX. I only had to dig out my fucking [I]birth certificate[/I] in one of those states for a secondary form of ID - and it definitely wasn't MN. Note that in Texas you need [I]both[/I] a voter registration card and a valid form of ID. I'm lucky I had a passport. I mean, shit, when I got my license I needed my birth certificate (plus consular report of a birth abroad), 2 forms that provided proof of residency dated within a few months (electric/water bill, etc), my physical SSN card, and loads of other shit. It also took me [I]seven hours[/I] waiting in the DMV to even [I]make an appointment[/I] for my driving test - arrived at 6am and didn't get helped until 1pm. There was a lady in front of me getting a photo ID, not a license, and she had to wait almost as long as I did. What if you can't get off work to wait in the DMV to go get a picture taken and printed on an ID? What if you don't have a license, want a picture ID, but you can't get a ride to/from the DMV on your day off? Tough shit, you [B]can't vote[/B]. It's blatant voter suppression and it's now been ruled discriminatory [I]five times[/I]. It's transparently not an attempt to prevent voter fraud, it's to make voting a hassle as much as possible. Other states do this perfectly fine without forcing you to jump through hoops to exercise your constitutional right to vote.[/QUOTE] People like sgman will ignore stuff like this because they don't want to admit that the only reason they defend and support voter ID laws is that it gives their party of choice an undemocratic advantage.
I considered our laws relatively reasonable. My impression was that there's quite a list of things that are supposed to be accepted as well, such as bills, bank statements, etc.. I didn't even have a voter registration card iirc and I was able to vote. But meh, that might have been just my experience and I could have been wrong. edit: according to google. you shouldn't need to bring the voter ID card. only one form of valid ID, e.g. drivers license. seems to be required. While voter ID is pretty much trying to fix a non-problem, the real way to do it would be to guarantee a national ID card. Which is something we're sorely lacking.
California they mail me my packet, I vote, and mail it back. Don't have to travel, miss work or anything.
[QUOTE=Jitterz;52618898]California they mail me my packet, I vote, and mail it back. Don't have to travel, miss work or anything.[/QUOTE] same here in washington, the worst part i've experienced with it is nearly forgetting to vote because the packet is left on my desk and gets buried under other paperwork :v:
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