• NASA is sending people to Mars.
    107 replies, posted
[IMG]http://i.imgur.com/I62iQRE.png[/IMG] Source: [URL]https://twitter.com/NASA/status/539814651404754944[/URL] [QUOTE]NASA's Journey to Mars NASA is developing the capabilities needed to send humans to an asteroid by 2025 and Mars in the 2030s – goals outlined in the bipartisan NASA Authorization Act of 2010 and in the U.S. National Space Policy, also issued in 2010. Mars is a rich destination for scientific discovery and robotic and human exploration as we expand our presence into the solar system. Its formation and evolution are comparable to Earth, helping us learn more about our own planet’s history and future. Mars had conditions suitable for life in its past. Future exploration could uncover evidence of life, answering one of the fundamental mysteries of the cosmos: Does life exist beyond Earth? While robotic explorers have studied Mars for more than 40 years, NASA’s path for the human exploration of Mars begins in low-Earth orbit aboard the International Space Station. Astronauts on the orbiting laboratory are helping us prove many of the technologies and communications systems needed for human missions to deep space, including Mars. The space station also advances our understanding of how the body changes in space and how to protect astronaut health. Our next step is deep space, where NASA will send a robotic mission to capture and redirect an asteroid to orbit the moon. Astronauts aboard the Orion spacecraft will explore the asteroid in the 2020s, returning to Earth with samples. This experience in human spaceflight beyond low-Earth orbit will help NASA test new systems and capabilities, such as Solar Electric Propulsion, which we’ll need to send cargo as part of human missions to Mars. Beginning in FY 2018, NASA’s powerful Space Launch System rocket will enable these “proving ground” missions to test new capabilities. Human missions to Mars will rely on Orion and an evolved version of SLS that will be the most powerful launch vehicle ever flown. A fleet of robotic spacecraft and rovers already are on and around Mars, dramatically increasing our knowledge about the Red Planet and paving the way for future human explorers. The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover measured radiation on the way to Mars and is sending back radiation data from the surface. This data will help us plan how to protect the astronauts who will explore Mars. Future missions like the Mars 2020 rover, seeking signs of past life, also will demonstrate new technologies that could help astronauts survive on Mars. Engineers and scientists around the country are working hard to develop the technologies astronauts will use to one day live and work on Mars, and safely return home from the next giant leap for humanity. NASA also is a leader in a Global Exploration Roadmap, working with international partners and the U.S. commercial space industry on a coordinated expansion of human presence into the solar system, with human missions to the surface of Mars as the driving goal. Follow our progress at [url]www.nasa.gov/exploration[/url] and [url]www.nasa.gov/mars[/url].[/QUOTE] [IMG]https://pbs.twimg.com/media/B33OkExCcAAKD5e.jpg:large[/IMG]
I wonder why this isn't getting much publicity.
I don't know to rate winner or optimistic
Too awesome to be true?
Probably going to be in a decade or so but it's good that it was announced. I'm cautious though because the Constellation program was also hyped up like this but ended up getting cancelled due to lack of funding.
[QUOTE=IliekBoxes;46623888]I don't know to rate winner or optimistic[/QUOTE] NASA is the only organization on this planet with an iota of the capacity to undertake something like this
Is it happening?
[QUOTE=Medevila;46623905]NASA is the only organization on this planet with an iota of the capacity to undertake something like this[/QUOTE] But will they get enough funding?
That link is wrong btw. This is the actual link [url]http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/[/url]
i wanna goto mars
More from NASA website [quote] NASA's Journey to Mars NASA is developing the capabilities needed to send humans to an asteroid by 2025 and Mars in the 2030s – goals outlined in the bipartisan NASA Authorization Act of 2010 and in the U.S. National Space Policy, also issued in 2010. Mars is a rich destination for scientific discovery and robotic and human exploration as we expand our presence into the solar system. Its formation and evolution are comparable to Earth, helping us learn more about our own planet’s history and future. Mars had conditions suitable for life in its past. Future exploration could uncover evidence of life, answering one of the fundamental mysteries of the cosmos: Does life exist beyond Earth? While robotic explorers have studied Mars for more than 40 years, NASA’s path for the human exploration of Mars begins in low-Earth orbit aboard the International Space Station. Astronauts on the orbiting laboratory are helping us prove many of the technologies and communications systems needed for human missions to deep space, including Mars. The space station also advances our understanding of how the body changes in space and how to protect astronaut health. Our next step is deep space, where NASA will send a robotic mission to capture and redirect an asteroid to orbit the moon. Astronauts aboard the Orion spacecraft will explore the asteroid in the 2020s, returning to Earth with samples. This experience in human spaceflight beyond low-Earth orbit will help NASA test new systems and capabilities, such as Solar Electric Propulsion, which we’ll need to send cargo as part of human missions to Mars. Beginning in FY 2018, NASA’s powerful Space Launch System rocket will enable these “proving ground” missions to test new capabilities. Human missions to Mars will rely on Orion and an evolved version of SLS that will be the most powerful launch vehicle ever flown. A fleet of robotic spacecraft and rovers already are on and around Mars, dramatically increasing our knowledge about the Red Planet and paving the way for future human explorers. The Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity rover measured radiation on the way to Mars and is sending back radiation data from the surface. This data will help us plan how to protect the astronauts who will explore Mars. Future missions like the Mars 2020 rover, seeking signs of past life, also will demonstrate new technologies that could help astronauts survive on Mars. Engineers and scientists around the country are working hard to develop the technologies astronauts will use to one day live and work on Mars, and safely return home from the next giant leap for humanity. NASA also is a leader in a Global Exploration Roadmap, working with international partners and the U.S. commercial space industry on a coordinated expansion of human presence into the solar system, with human missions to the surface of Mars as the driving goal. Follow our progress at [url]www.nasa.gov/exploration[/url] and [url]www.nasa.gov/mars[/url]. [/quote]
Maybe i wasn't born to early to watch mankind explore other worlds?
[QUOTE=PC_Paul;46623928]More from NASA website[/QUOTE] I'll pop this in OP.
[QUOTE=Svinnik;46623894]Probably going to be in a decade or so but it's good that it was announced. I'm cautious though because the Constellation program was also hyped up like this but ended up getting cancelled due to lack of funding.[/QUOTE] This is the most likely outcome
Imagine. Within two generations, less than 100 years, we go from not having left Earth to landing on Mars. This is truly a groundbreaking time for humans.
[quote]Our next step is deep space, where NASA will send a robotic mission to capture and redirect an asteroid to orbit the moon.[/quote] Is this how the world ends?
[QUOTE=Jamsponge;46623981]Imagine. Within two generations, less than 100 years, we go from not having left Earth to landing on Mars. This is truly a groundbreaking time for humans.[/QUOTE] If they would pull it off for 2030 then it would be only 127 years from the first Wright brothers flight to first humans on Mars. Let that sink in for a minute.
You probably can't get buzzed, so there's half the fun. Sure as fuck couldn't do it any other way, sounds depressing but great pride will be bestowed upon those who do this.
This is great news. After we land on Mars, we can expand our civilizations beyond Earth.
Can't wait to meet the 52nd state
I have my doubts, but this is definitelyprogress
okay now i have to really get into the aero department not all hope is lost \o/ ill go study for finals now
I mean it's really hard to call into question such a conservative plan?? They've laid out totally achievable objectives, we'd still be sending rovers well into the 2020s
I unfortunately am unsure they'll reach this goal within the next 50 years. I really hope they do though. Shame this isn't getting more publicity.
[QUOTE=Bradyns;46623855] [IMG]https://pbs.twimg.com/media/B33OkExCcAAKD5e.jpg:large[/IMG][/QUOTE] kind of looks like the logo of unitology in dead space
[QUOTE=Hat-Wearing Man;46624155]Can't wait to meet the 52nd state[/QUOTE] The US will secretly take over all of Mars, the Moon and Earth in the future to become the Red, White and Blue.
[QUOTE=The Duke;46624286]The US will secretly take over all of Mars, the Moon and Earth in the future to become the Red, White and Blue.[/QUOTE] oh god that's the perfect plan
Will most likely get cancelled because nobody wants to fund this sort of stuff anymore. The driving motivation behind US sending people to the moon was to make a giant erect political cock to wave at the Soviet Union. So unless oil is discovered on Mars, there will probably never be any US colonization of Mars.
[QUOTE=The Duke;46624286]The US will secretly take over all of Mars, the Moon and Earth in the future to become the Red, White and Blue.[/QUOTE] Then they unless the demons from the hell gate with no one to stop them but ........ doomguy.
[QUOTE=NeverGoWest;46624447]Will most likely get cancelled because nobody wants to fund this sort of stuff anymore. The driving motivation behind US sending people to the moon was to make a giant erect political cock to wave at the Soviet Union. So unless oil is discovered on Mars, there will probably never be any US colonization of Mars.[/QUOTE] Both China and Russia are getting into space and there's a private space industry blossoming. The US could tell China and Russia to sit down and the Space Industry gets huge publicity. This is more about exploration and research than colonization.
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