• Houston Police Officer drowns at work
    25 replies, posted
[url]http://dfw.cbslocal.com/2017/08/29/report-houston-police-officer-drowns-in-floodwaters/[/url] [quote]Sgt. Perez was in his patrol car driving to work in downtown Sunday morning when he got trapped in high water at I-45 and the Hardy Toll Road.Chief Acevedo said Perez’s family did not want him to go to work, but he did, telling his family,[B] “We’ve got work to do.”[/B] Perez was two days shy of his 60th birthday.[/quote] RIP you brave, beautiful man.
i love hearing about officers who truly care about their job as a police officer and what it stands for. he was a good man who died because he wanted to help other people.
how did he get trapped in the car? unbuckle belt > shoot window if water pressure too much > climb out?
[QUOTE=Amplar;52629174]how did he get trapped in the car? unbuckle belt > shoot window if water pressure too much > climb out?[/QUOTE] The truth in media is that the hero ascends from the lake from the descending car. Reality is a totally different story, if the car is completely submerged you are of course - Running out of oxygen - Actually going to have to ascend from unknown depths of water, which for poor swimmers or people like me who cannot swim is a death sentence. If you manage to be lucky and not have the car be totally submerged however.. - You have to get onto the roof of the car, which potentially could be in the middle of a current that will push the car into unknown directions. - Likely won't have a properly functioning phone to call for help, so you might have to wait for someone. Which can be dangerous if your car is on the move by a current. There are many factors, but everyone cannot be an action superstar and swim ashore to safety. Life unlike movies and television is complicated, and unfair..
[QUOTE=coolgame8013;52629411] which for poor swimmers or people like me who cannot swim is a death sentence.[/QUOTE] How common is this? It's absolutely unheard of in the Netherlands where pretty much every kid takes swimming lessons in elementary school and takes an exam in it. There's even talks of making it mandatory for immigrants now because they make up the largest part of people drowning here.
[QUOTE=coolgame8013;52629411] - Actually going to have to ascend from unknown depths of water, which for poor swimmers or people like me who cannot swim is a death sentence. [/QUOTE] Higher chance of survival than staying in the car suffocating though.
It's not mandatory here, elementary schools here don't even teach things like swimming ( at least where I live, other schools may vary ). I do remember my parents mentioning how schools around here taught driving at some point but that's no longer being done any more.
[QUOTE=Goz3rr;52629426]How common is this? It's absolutely unheard of in the Netherlands where pretty much every kid takes swimming lessons in elementary school and takes an exam in it. There's even talks of making it mandatory for immigrants now because they make up the largest part of people drowning here.[/QUOTE] All of the public schools I've been to did not have a pool except for a nearby state college. Naturally, there is no requirement since it means after school activities, which most children are not interested in, and/or paying for transportation on a tight budget. Massachusetts BTW.
[QUOTE=coolgame8013;52629440]It's not mandatory here, elementary schools here don't even teach things like swimming ( at least where I live, other schools may vary ). I do remember my parents mentioning how schools around here taught driving at some point but that's no longer being done any more.[/QUOTE] Yup, it really should be though. For whatever reason, all my brothers got to go to a drown proofing class but I don't remember that opportunity being offered to me in elementary school.
[QUOTE=Amplar;52629174]how did he get trapped in the car? unbuckle belt > shoot window if water pressure too much > climb out?[/QUOTE] [video=youtube;q3_HEKMgqbE]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3_HEKMgqbE[/video] This is just a [B]CONTROLLED SCENARIO[/B] where Adam had to use air. Imagine this + an possible injury from the crash (The impact could have caused your head to bash against the steering wheel) + no safety procedures or help on the way + adrenaline and panic + the car may be crushed + The cops belt could be stuck on something Lets not forget that the water the cop was dealing with was most likely [B]freezing cold[/B], which not only dampens movement but dampens breathing itself. Another factor is water current, and if it was active water the car could have been moving around.
[QUOTE=RichyZ;52629439]well for one, the us doesn't have mandatory swimming lessons, and most people who don't live near a deep lake or beach don't really know how to swim well[/QUOTE] It's not mandatory here either but most parents will send their kids to swimming lessons. [QUOTE=RichyZ;52629439]that said, im pretty sure cops should know how to swim, but this dude was nearly 60 so it could've gone any way[/QUOTE] I didn't mean to imply that the cop should've been an excellent swimmer and been able to save himself, I was just wondering about the general population. It takes just a few hours to teach people how to stay afloat which should already reduce drowning by a lot (although probably not in this case).
[QUOTE=Amplar;52629174]how did he get trapped in the car? unbuckle belt > shoot window if water pressure too much > climb out?[/QUOTE] he was an old man. he may have underestimated how dangerous the situation was. it's easy to sit comfortable in a chair and give your 20/20 hindsight vision, but in the moment, it's a completely different experience. he could have been panicking. he could have been knocked out if there was an impact. even if he got out, fighting against the water would have been tough for someone half his age. RIP to the guy, what an absolute champ. it's such a shame he died, and drowning is one of the worst ways to go. the article is really vague and doesn't say exactly how it happened. did he get caught in the flood and it slowly surrounded his car? did he crash into the water?
Cops also wear body armor and a gun belt, weighing you down. (that includes a gun, holster, two magazines, maybe a radio, flashlight, baton, taser, pepper spray, etc)
[QUOTE=Goz3rr;52629426]How common is this? It's absolutely unheard of in the Netherlands where pretty much every kid takes swimming lessons in elementary school and takes an exam in it. There's even talks of making it mandatory for immigrants now because they make up the largest part of people drowning here.[/QUOTE] unlike you whose country is endangered by water the US is huge and has a lot of solid ground, what do you think?
[QUOTE=OvB;52630251]Cops also wear body armor and a gun belt, weighing you down. (that includes a gun, holster, two magazines, maybe a radio, flashlight, baton, taser, pepper spray, etc)[/QUOTE] In other words, a bunch of stuff that will get caught on a seatbelt and make it way harder to swim
[QUOTE=Mr.Brown;52630479]unlike you whose country is endangered by water the US is huge and has a lot of solid ground, what do you think?[/QUOTE] You're literally saying the US isn't endangered by water while there's places currently under a few feet of it? People never go to pools/lakes/beaches? I just can't imagine why people living in a first world country would not learn how to at least stay afloat. Again I understand swimming in a flood is something completely different than floating in a pool but I was just baffled that coolgame8013 said he couldn't swim
[QUOTE=Goz3rr;52636386]You're literally saying the US isn't endangered by water while there's places currently under a few feet of it? People never go to pools/lakes/beaches? I just can't imagine why people living in a first world country would not learn how to at least stay afloat. Again I understand swimming in a flood is something completely different than floating in a pool but I was just baffled that coolgame8013 said he couldn't swim[/QUOTE] It makes complete sense in a country as vast as the US where you can easily be hours away from any nearby body of water, to not have a large focus on swimming. It's sad of course but a lot of people just will not have a lot of interactions with water, so they don't even think of learning it. And I'm saying this as someone living in Denmark, which has a large amount of coastline compared to our size.
[QUOTE=coolgame8013;52629411]The truth in media is that the hero ascends from the lake from the descending car. Reality is a totally different story, if the car is completely submerged you are of course - Running out of oxygen - Actually going to have to ascend from unknown depths of water, which for poor swimmers or people like me who cannot swim is a death sentence. If you manage to be lucky and not have the car be totally submerged however.. - You have to get onto the roof of the car, which potentially could be in the middle of a current that will push the car into unknown directions. - Likely won't have a properly functioning phone to call for help, so you might have to wait for someone. Which can be dangerous if your car is on the move by a current. There are many factors, but everyone cannot be an action superstar and swim ashore to safety. Life unlike movies and television is complicated, and unfair..[/QUOTE] Still, it's hard to imagine how an officer could drown since they have fitness standards and so much equipment Tragic
[QUOTE=Foogooman;52636464]Still, it's hard to imagine how an officer could drown since they have fitness standards and so much equipment Tragic[/QUOTE] I don't think they train for floods like this
[QUOTE=Foogooman;52636464]Still, it's hard to imagine how an officer could drown since they have fitness standards and so much equipment Tragic[/QUOTE] I mean, they're not wearing personal floatations devices... They're wearing roughly 30 lbs of very much non-buoyant equipment.
[QUOTE=Foogooman;52636464]Still, it's hard to imagine how an officer could drown since they have fitness standards and so much equipment Tragic[/QUOTE] Its hard to imagine how tens of pounds of equipment will prevent you from swimming in freezing cold moving waters after being trapped inside of a death box?
[QUOTE=Apache249;52636875]I mean, they're not wearing personal floatations devices... They're wearing roughly 30 lbs of very much non-buoyant equipment.[/QUOTE] Even with PFDs they may not hold them.
[QUOTE=Goz3rr;52636386] Again I understand swimming in a flood is something completely different than floating in a pool but I was just baffled that coolgame8013 said he couldn't swim[/QUOTE] I mean I never put much thought into it, even when I visit beaches or water parks I just try to go within my means and I still manage to have a good time.
I have a friend who hangs out with some less than upstanding characters and he and I can both confirm It's not particularly easy to swim out of a submerged car. Typically breaking the window or opening the door is going to rapidly change the pressure which will most likely knock you out. Secondly swimming with shoes typically weighs you down, so It's advisable to take them off before you get ready to leave a submerged vehicle.
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