• Gardening Hobby Thread - For growing vegetables, flowers, fruits, houseplants, and more
    202 replies, posted
[quote]I have been amateur gardening for many years now and I'm here looking to see if anyone else here on Facepunch has a green thumb like myself. With the last frosts just a half dozen weeks from now, I figured it would be the best time to start discussion what to grow. Hopefully talking about growing plants will encourage some to take up the hobby. For you guys thinking of doing it or interested in learning, I've written up a general guide for growing plants.[/quote] [quote][B]Why try growing plants?[/B] Honestly, why not? It's a very simple and easy hobby to do once the plant is in some soil. You can grow your own food with vegetables, spruce up your lawn, or decorate your house with plants. [url=https://www.nbcnews.com/better/health/indoor-plants-can-instantly-boost-your-health-happiness-ncna781806]Having house plants can boost your health, clean your air, and generally make you feel happy[/url] so there's not really a downside to it. [B]What should I grow?[/B] That highly depends on your location and what your preferences are. If you're looking to grow vegetables, what do you like to eat? Look up your plant hardiness zone and see if your favorite green likes the environment you live in. If you're looking to grow flowers, what smells most pleasant to you, or looks the most satisfying? Plant Hardiness Zones: [url=http://planthardiness.gc.ca/?m=1]Canada[/url] [url=http://planthardiness.ars.usda.gov/PHZMWeb/]United States of America[/url] [url=https://www.gardenia.net/guide/european-hardiness-zones]Europe Continent[/url] [url=https://www.anbg.gov.au/gardens/research/hort.research/zones.html]Commonwealth of Australia[/url] [B]Why grow vegetables?[/B] The first easy answer is that there's nothing quite satisfying as biting into a tomato or cucumber that you grew yourself from seed. Beyond that, there's a matter of health. Most people, especially in the West, eat far far too much fatty and sugary food. Eating vegetables daily can and will curb your risk of dozens of different diseases, from diabetes and heart attack, to stroke or sudden death. There is a very large grain of truth in the phrase "an apple a day keeps the doctor away". Plus it's easier to budget a food plan when you grow your own food. A single potato grown correctly could yield several pounds of food by time it's ready for harvest. With the right variety of plants and a proper gardening plan, there is the potential to save hundreds of dollars on produce from the supermarket. Here's a picture of my garden this past summer of 2017. I have carrots, bell peppers, cucumbers, tomatoes, oregano, culantro, and sage growing [t]https://i.imgur.com/luwTFvp.jpg[/t][/quote] [quote][B]Where do I start? - Sunlight[/B] So you have picked out your favorite vegetable and know it can be grown in your climate. The next step is to find a sunny piece of land to plant it in. Most plants require "full sun", which is a 6 to 8 hours of daylight hitting its leaves. Don't be alarmed if your yard doesn't get sunlight from dawn to dusk; there is such thing as too much of a good thing, with plants being open to wilting, sunburn, and overheating if they get too much sun. Alternatively, many leafy green vegetables such as spinach and lettuce prefer "some sun", which 4 to 6 hours of sunlight. These plants like the more shady places in the yard and will die quickly if they get too much sunlight all day. [B]Next step - Soil[/B] Soil is essential for giving your plants nutrients, feeding them water, and giving them an anchor during bad weather. There are three types - clay, sandy, and loam soil. Clay soil is thick and compact, making it difficult for roots to grow and prevents water from draining properly, leaving the surface often damp or flooded. Sandy soil is very fine silt, which makes it difficult for roots to anchor properly, while water tends to drain too fast for plants to take in. Loam soil is the prefect mix between clay and sand and is the ultimate goal to get. Clay or sandy soil can be amended to change its texture by adding a variety of minerals to the soil such as perlite. Plants need nutrients just as any animal does. The "big three" of plant nutrients are nitrogen (N) (for healthy, green leaves), potassium/potash (K) (for plant immune system and stem strength), and phosphorus (P) (for healthy roots). Different plants need these three in different ratios; for example lettuce tends to need more nitrogen while potatoes prefer phosphorus and potash. You can buy fertilizer with these 3 in them, looking for a 3 digit number on the bag. The preferred ratio is 7-7-7. [B]Step 3 - Water[/B] After you have a sunny spot, given your soil a boost, and put a seed in the ground, the next step is remembering to water it. Different plants require different amounts of water. A good rule-of-thumb is, the juicier the vegetable is, the more water the plant needs. Tomatoes are very juicy vegetables and their mother plant is a very thirsty one. You will want to water your garden at minimum twice a week, and more times during very hot days of the summer. Plants that prefer the shade, like lettuce, tend to not need as much watering as others unless it is overwhelmingly hot out. ---- There's a plethora of more things to know about gardening than what I've written here but these are the basics to help you get thinking about growing produce or flowers. More things to look up on your own would be learning to compost, seed saving, pest control, and how to aerate your soil. [/quote] [quote][B]Emperor Scorpious's garden of 2017:[/B] [I]Sugar Snap Peas - my personal favorite to grow[/I] [t]https://i.imgur.com/wIHA9Pu.jpg[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/oCdmskp.jpg[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/HlUkiXF.jpg[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/HI6SPq6.jpg[/t] [I]Carrots - First time I ever grew them[/I] [t]https://i.imgur.com/oqSVzyZ.jpg[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/aiZ5DaE.jpg[/t] [I]Cherry tomatoes - Probably the easiest thing to grow[/I] [t]https://i.imgur.com/htMJ2tM.jpg[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/OcTsV5z.jpg[/t] And here's some lettuce, corn, and strawberries from my fiance's garden: [t]https://i.imgur.com/kI2XCnW.jpg[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/03CQkYU.jpg[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/iUV3BU8.jpg[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/5WfLgjx.jpg[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/Dqs0cS3.jpg[/t][/quote] I have already mapped out my gardens this year and purchased a lot of seeds. My goal is to grow something new every year, so I am growing leeks for the first time. If this thread takes off well, I'll keep posting and updating on my plants as the spring goes into summer and then into fall. I am hoping others do the same. More than happy to answer any questions, as well.
How do you get your whole gardening to work with work etc.? I imagine having a full-time job would restrict the time available to care for the garden on a daily basis.
[QUOTE=Viper123_SWE;53122638]How do you get your whole gardening to work with work etc.? I imagine having a full-time job would restrict the time available to care for the garden on a daily basis.[/QUOTE] It does on occasion, but plants once in the ground mostly take care of themselves. Sometime around March or early April, I'll spend a whole weekend clearing out my garden, tilling up the dirt and mixing in compost/fertilizer, then planting in the seeds or seed pods I had grown indoors. After that one weekend, 90% of the garden takes care of itself, all I do is keep it watered 2 or 3 times a week. The biggest challenge is keeping the weeds at bay, but all that is really needed is an hour tops on the weekend (or before/after work) to hoe out all the weeds. My fiance's garden is almost entirely sand, which makes weeding incredibly easy because a rake going over them not only rips them, but often pulls them out by the root. The soil in my yard is pretty compact clay, so when I hoe over the soil, I'm mostly scraping the top and just ripping off the leaves while the roots regrow them later, but so long as they're not getting so large as to threaten the nutrient supply to my vegetables, I don't mind it. I really enjoy doing yard work, so at times I actually get excited that I have to do some upkeep on the garden on the weekends. Almost all of my plants don't get finished growing fruit all at once, so harvesting isn't time consuming either. I often pick 4 or 5 cherry tomatoes every other day, but I've never had a plant ripen entirely all at once.
Been planning out on doing some hydroponics via kratky method with grow lights, no pumps & minimal materials. The whole DIY aspect of growing hydroponically is cool as frig, but my level of patience for things in general is absolute zero, thought doing as a hobby might fix that. Will update when I get it going.
I've never tried hydroponics, mostly because it always seemed to be more of an "indoors" thing, but also because it seems to fairly more costly. Would love to see how your hydroponics do, what are you planning to grow?
[QUOTE=Craptasket;53122695]Been planning out on doing some hydroponics via kratky method with grow lights, no pumps & minimal materials. The whole DIY aspect of growing hydroponically is cool as frig, but my level of patience for things in general is absolute zero, thought doing as a hobby might fix that. Will update when I get it going.[/QUOTE] I've been pretty darn interested in this, too. Took a stab at it with a 50 gallon drum, with holes cut into it for net pots, but ending up borking the cuts and ruining it. Haven't given it another go yet, but have been considering building a plant wall with 2x4's, plywood, and waterproof liner paint, paired with a pump and sprayer and some LED light strips. I would like to grow Mint. If I'm feeling real ambitious, I also like the idea of building planters for soybeans. With soybeans, I could make soymilk, infuse it with mint, and make a lovely soap out of it to sell to the fancy bath boutique places in old town.
Imagine if we all get our local, small communities to grow fruit and veg in our own gardens together, and all share between us whenever we have the chance to. We would pretty much be eating healthy for free.
Any advice on good, simple plants I can keep on my windowsill and tend to every now and then? Cacti seem obvious but I dunno.
[QUOTE=Emperor Scorpious II;53122909]I've never tried hydroponics, mostly because it always seemed to be more of an "indoors" thing, but also because it seems to fairly more costly. Would love to see how your hydroponics do, what are you planning to grow?[/QUOTE] oh ffs FP ate a post I was typing for hours, so I'm giving you the short version: Yeah Texas weather isn't exactly ideal for me to keep up with, even if I use soil the plants would have to be in tote containers. Looking to grow common kitchen herbs and lettuce after building the nursery. Have enough to casually pick and eat when time. end goal: lettuce and herbs all year maybe. grape tomatoes and golden potatoes to harvest maybe few times a year. Only plant I'm willing to grow at precise time, conditions, and even space are watermelons tbh. Electricity for the grow lights would just be to maximize growth potential. Only thing I have to do when the seedling is set with roots in the water is measure out and deploy fertilizer once, watch the water level, and do basic plant maintenance. Sounds well within what I can handle. [editline]10th February 2018[/editline] [QUOTE=DeVotchKa;53123236]Any advice on good, simple plants I can keep on my windowsill and tend to every now and then? Cacti seem obvious but I dunno.[/QUOTE] Succulents and their grow kits are pretty fun. [t]https://i.imgur.com/FTZm87I.jpg[/t] [editline]10th February 2018[/editline] [QUOTE=Big Dumb American;53123198]I've been pretty darn interested in this, too. Took a stab at it with a 50 gallon drum, with holes cut into it for net pots, but ending up borking the cuts and ruining it. Haven't given it another go yet, but have been considering building a plant wall with 2x4's, plywood, and waterproof liner paint, paired with a pump and sprayer and some LED light strips. I would like to grow Mint. If I'm feeling real ambitious, I also like the idea of building planters for soybeans. With soybeans, I could make soymilk, infuse it with mint, and make a lovely soap out of it to sell to the fancy bath boutique places in old town.[/QUOTE] If I went all out, it'll ether be PVC pipes or [t]https://i.imgur.com/LJVfxed.png[/t] this format looks fun. Reservoir on the bottom with a pump, sprayers on top. Each layer has it's growth media running into what I hope is a waterfall inside.
[QUOTE=Steam-Pixie;53123219]Imagine if we all get our local, small communities to grow fruit and veg in our own gardens together, and all share between us whenever we have the chance to. We would pretty much be eating healthy for free.[/QUOTE] There are actually a lot of places that do this, if not in your town then possibly in an adjacent one. For example, a guy named [url=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EzZzZ_qpZ4w]Ron Finley started a community vegetable garden in Los Angeles.[/url] You can start to do this too by simply planting soft fruits or bush vegetables out in your front yard that is accessible to passersby instead of your back yard. [editline]11th February 2018[/editline] [QUOTE=DeVotchKa;53123236]Any advice on good, simple plants I can keep on my windowsill and tend to every now and then? Cacti seem obvious but I dunno.[/QUOTE] Try herbs, perhaps. They tend to grow only as large as their pot allows and many of them flower. My mother has a few spider plants in the house. They tend to thrive even when neglected, and the baby plants can be cut off and given away as presents when they're large enough. [editline]11th February 2018[/editline] [QUOTE=Big Dumb American;53123198]I would like to grow Mint. [/QUOTE] I would definitely try to keep them grown in pots, if possible. My fiance's grandfather planted mint in her yard about a decade ago, and now it has spread so much that it's more of an invasive weed than a herb in the yard.
New gardening thread looks cool for me growing weed is cool hobby
Good to know my neck of the woods is one of the more temperate in New York; gonna be handy when I eventually set up a vegetable garden.
Forgot to mention, I'm in the midst of growing an avocado fruit tree. This avocado was grown in a glass of water first (thus the toothpicks to hold it up) straight out of a store bought avocado from shoprite. Just goes to show that you don't have to know a special seed seller to get something started [t]https://i.imgur.com/Nus4CJy.jpg[/t] [editline]12th February 2018[/editline] It hasn't taken to transplanting from the cup of water to soil very well, thus why the leaves are kind of wilted. Doing my best to keep it alive; though there are two new shoots coming up from the base now. [editline]12th February 2018[/editline] [QUOTE=RasmusG5;53123652]New gardening thread looks cool for me growing weed is cool hobby[/QUOTE] Hey man, I put in "and more" in the thread title for a reason :v:
If your avocado has new shoots you might as well prune your wilty shoot. There's no sense in letting the plant waste energy trying to repair that damaged tissue if you can encourage it to make new healthy tissue. Also pruning might encourage a more compact growth pattern. Another excellent potted plant is ginger/turmeric. You can often plant a rhizome nodule bought from the grocery store. A few varieties have excellent flowers, but people in colder climates will probably have trouble getting them to flower. Also, for those interested in heirloom varieties, [URL="https://www.rareseeds.com"]Baker Creek[/URL] has some excellent seeds. They've got like 40 some types of cucumbers. Their catalog is mesmerizing.
[QUOTE=1legmidget;53127282] Also, for those interested in heirloom varieties, [URL="https://www.rareseeds.com"]Baker Creek[/URL] has some excellent seeds. They've got like 40 some types of cucumbers. Their catalog is mesmerizing.[/QUOTE] I have never heard of a black tomato before, interesting. And your advice for my avocado makes sense. Should I trim it back while the shoots are about an inch high, or when they begin to leaf?
[QUOTE=Emperor Scorpious II;53127790]I have never heard of a black tomato before, interesting. And your advice for my avocado makes sense. Should I trim it back while the shoots are about an inch high, or when they begin to leaf?[/QUOTE] If you wait until they leaf, there's a good chance the avocado is going to continue to grow leggy. Pruning earlier can sometimes jump-start leaf development as the plant goes into what I like to think of as the "oh shit" mode. So long as those other shoots look healthy, you'll probably be OK. That pit is chock full of reserves basically for this exact purpose. Worst case scenario you'll have to try to get another pit to sprout, but that just means you get to eat more avocado.
I've actually tried growing 6 avocado pits this past summer, this is the only one that split and began to grow. The others didn't do anything, with only one other that split partially but didn't do anything further for months afterward. I'm guessing there's a small success rate with them
[t]https://i.imgur.com/WbUsn2Z.jpg[/t] I don't really have many plants yet, but I do have these 4 (with the one on the top being dead now RIP). The other nep isn't as interesting because I've just planted it and these things take a shittonne of time to come out. And the flytrap is hibernating, so it's pretty boring too :vv: I do plan to set this: [t]https://i.imgur.com/yGbSeGj.jpg[/t] up sometimes soon. Currently I'm using [URL="https://www.banggood.com/40W-E27-255-Red-97-Blue-Garden-Plant-Growth-LED-Bulb-Greenhouse-Plant-Seedling-Light-p-1030098.html?rmmds=myorder&cur_warehouse=CN"]this[/URL], and they seem to be alright with it
[QUOTE=Emperor Scorpious II;53123347]I would definitely try to keep them grown in pots, if possible. My fiance's grandfather planted mint in her yard about a decade ago, and now it has spread so much that it's more of an invasive weed than a herb in the yard.[/QUOTE] The plan was a simple indoor pot if growing in small quantities, for the occasional tea. Larger scale, for making mint products, I would probably set up a hydroponic grow wall. Mint is absurdly easy to grow, and can be turned into a lot of simple products. Teas, soaps, lotions, bath bombs, face scrub, natural bug repellent, etc. Even cat toys -- mint and catnip are in the same family, and cats go fucking bonkers for it. This latter fact is the only reason I haven't already started trying to grow it. I'd need to cage it to keep it safe from the cat :v:
My carolina reaper and some unnamed neon blue pepper seeds germinated , can't wait for them to sprout up , will be growing under a homemade LED lamp that's leftover from my weed experiments.
I planted some lettuce, leeks, and sugar snap peas today in some seed pods. Took pictures of the whole process of soaking them, still sorta fun to watch the pods pop up soaking in the water. [t]https://i.imgur.com/Ays0rp4.jpg?1[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/nGHU1AU.jpg?1[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/NLr6EaL.jpg?2[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/sb3oJk3.jpg[/t] [t]https://i.imgur.com/GTapsvY.jpg?2[/t]
Some of my lettuce have sprouted [t]https://i.imgur.com/m5V1ZkQ.jpg[/t]
Lettuce update, got two duds but 10 heads is more than enough. [t]https://i.imgur.com/ZP549v9.jpg[/t] Peas are beginning to really grow while others seem to be duds. [t]https://i.imgur.com/4vdl7TA.jpg[/t] Leeks are beginning to break the ground too, don't seem to have any duds [t]https://i.imgur.com/nsbOQJ7.jpg[/t]
Shit I didn't know we had a gardening thread. [t]https://i.imgur.com/I05hQOb.jpg[/t] I've been growing these pomegranates for like 3 years now, started them from seed from a pomegranate at the grocery store, they started as 12 but one never sprouted and the other was so small the heat killed it. So far they have been doubling in size each year, I hope to get them in the ground in a year or 2 but I'm scared the winter will kill them off. [t]https://i.imgur.com/7Hos8uT.jpg[/t] Housed them in the newly constructed green house over the winter this year instead of the basement.
Winter shouldn't be too bad on them so long as they have a woody stem. That is where plants hold their water in the winter so it doesn't freeze IIRC. I have a dozen sage plants that have woody stems I planted last year and left them outside all winter long, even in 2 feet of snow and dropping to near 0 degrees F and they're still currently green. [editline]23rd February 2018[/editline] Also your greenhouse looks amazing
Was considering setting up another garden this year. Just gotta wait for the snow too go away, and then I get going at whatever I intend on growing. Sadly I cannot do cannabis yet, but that might be coming next year.
Spinach and broccoli sprouting. Peas too, but I've already shown pictures of those. These are all going to my fiance's garden in a few weeks. [t]https://i.imgur.com/P5epojA.jpg[/t]
Well I got a bit of a problem. My grape root came in the mail yesterday and it's filled with instructions yelling "PLANT IMMEDIATELY", but my region is suppose to have a snow storm next week and it keeps going below freezing outside. Can't plant my other stuff yet either, but they can hold out while the grapes cannot apparently. Never had a March this cold for this far into the month before. Normally the last time it snows is in February and the last frost is the first, maybe second week of March.
Cool, I've been looking for a thread like this. I started growing chilies indoors about a month ago. Here's my Bird's Eye chili plant I grew from seeds I saved from a bag of imported dried peppers I got at the store. https://files.facepunch.com/forum/upload/111080/7a6c5ab5-2b28-4f96-8968-7b3c1da93ce5/20180321_073341.jpg My setup is shit, but it works for now. Working on germinating some Carolina Reapers, so hopefully I'll have some new additions to my pepper plant family in a few weeks!
Grow Kush All Day Every Day
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