• PC Building V4 - "ok SSDs got cheap, now do RAM next"
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Hey all, welcome to the PC Building thread. Want to build or upgrade? No problem, this is the place. Resources pcpartpicker.com – A fantastic resource for both comparing prices from many websites and doing some basic compatibility checks. To export in a format compatible with FP, select Export/Markup, then under format select BBCode. Then copy and paste the text in your post. The best part of all is that this site is available in many different regions and countries Here are two excellent guides for the actual assembly of a system. It's actually fairly easy, and following a good guide like one of these, the chances to mess something up are extremely slim. An excellent step-by-step guide using pictures, it is cleanly laid out and easy to follow This is a multi-part Newegg YouTube series that is very long and comprehensive. Part 1 Part 2 Part 3 General Building/Component Tips If you get hung up on any details, go ahead and ask. No question is stupid in the realm of blowing $1k on a new system. Watch the quality of your PSU. It's not going to give you any extra performance, but a poor quality PSU can cause unnecessary stress on your component, causing them to age faster. Seasonic and rebrands such as XFX and Rosewill Capstone are excellent buys, as are SuperFlower units (and accompanying rebrand of the EVGA G2 series) and finally Delta units, most commonly they are found in Antec boxes. Check out the Antec HCP if you're in the market for a top notch PSU with high wattage. And please don't get a Corsair CX. Watch out for motherboard compatibility. An 1150/1155 socket motherboard does NOT mean it will work out of the box with every CPU that fits. You need to watch out for refeshes and "ticks" in the architecture. A good case can make or break a long term build. A good case is a dream to build in, and can both increase airflow and ease the process, while a bad case can bend, and leave some nasty cuts. Don't listen to just one person for your build if you've got time to wait. People have bias', and can miss some nice deals that just dropped. Even Kiwi. If you get hung up on any details, go ahead and ask. No question is stupid in the realm of blowing $1k on a new system. Watch the quality of your PSU. It's not going to give you any extra performance, but a poor quality PSU can cause unnecessary stress on your component, causing them to age faster. Seasonic and rebrands such as XFX and Rosewill Capstone are excellent buys, as are SuperFlower units (and accompanying rebrand of the EVGA G2 series) and finally Delta units, most commonly they are found in Antec boxes. Check out the Antec HCP if you're in the market for a top notch PSU with high wattage. And please don't get a Corsair CX. Watch out for motherboard compatibility. An 1150/1155 socket motherboard does NOT mean it will work out of the box with every CPU that fits. You need to watch out for refeshes and "ticks" in the architecture. A good case can make or break a long term build. A good case is a dream to build in, and can both increase airflow and ease the process, while a bad case can bend, and leave some nasty cuts. Don't listen to just one person for your build if you've got time to wait. People have bias', and can miss some nice deals that just dropped. Even Kiwi. Check your motherboard's QVL, especially for Ryzen. This will ensure that your high-frequency RAM will actually be able to hit those advertised clocks. Ryzen 2000 does much better with RAM compatibility than Ryzen 1000 did but there are still snags in the way. Recommended Power Supply Models Here's just a quick list of model names that are generally recommended for a great quality unit that should last a long time without issues. Seasonic: m12/S12/S12G/S12-II, XFX: TS/XTR/PRO, Superflower: Any, EVGA: G2/P2/T2/GS, Antec: HCG/TruePowerClassic/Earthwatts Green/Edge/HCP Builds There used to be a bunch of recommended builds here but they weren't super up-to-date and I don't really believe in "suggested builds," so I've left them out. http://www.logicalincrements.com/ is a really good jumping-off point, though, and if anybody has recommendations I'll post them here, just ping me or some shit idk
Oh damn, good tip. I didn't come up with any surprised but judging by the list there's plenty that can go wrong
For Intel it's almost a non-issue but it's something Ryzen still has trouble with. Just a buyer beware situation.
Just bought 8 gigs of RAM the other day, cost me 90 eurobux. God damn it's expensive, but now I have a total of 16, I think that's enough for a while. IIRC I don't have any more slots than the 4 I have occupied. I would probably upgrade my motherboard (and CPU) and switch out the RAM to faster speeds (I have 1600 mHz DDR3 atm) in a couple of years or so. Anyone else got DDR4 already??
Went to DDR4 a year ago, 1333 MHz -> 3000 MHz.
ddr4 cheaper then oc ddr3
Ok so my friend is curious if it's possible for her to build a $500 PC for decent performance when gaming. Is this possible with the current hardware offerings?
I just put this together. https://pcpartpicker.com/list/MBKkjy $200 more would give you a radically better system, specifically one with a discrete GPU so consider that.
Thank you so much for this. This is a pretty good starting point
Don't know if this is the right place but it involves pc building so i'll ask I've got a i5 6500 right now, I originally had a 970 when i built this rig but I have a 1070ti now. It's obviously bottlenecking in high intensity games, so would an i5 8600k be a good upgrade? I have a lga 1151 socket on my board
Gotta get a new board, coffee lake requires 300-series chipset. That i7 6500 is Skylake, so you're on 100-series. Go Ryzen AM4 is going to be supported through 2020.
As long as you don't mind sacrificing 5%-ish single-threaded gaming performance. Intel is still better for "pure gaming," Ryzen is a much better deal for multitasking and streaming.
I'd argue unless you play exclusive fullscreen and run basically nothing else in the background, then yeh. But most people have a ton of shit open (Discord, steam, music, streams) - I think real-world Ryzen is going to outperform Intel for most people.
The 5% you won't notice unless you're running pulling > 144 FPS which will narrow over time as more and more games starting taking advantage of higher core counts is worth the amount you save and actually having an upgrade path without replacing the fucking MB every time. Seeing all 16 threads at 40% utilisation is 👌
plus honestly always having to buy a new mobo for any intel CPU upgrades pisses me off Stop chanGING SOCKETS SO OFTEN
i also think we are only going to see multithreaded performance improve and be more important than single threaded performance especially since the majority of systems used for gaming (ps4/xbone) are 8 cores@1.6/1.75GHz
The ryzen is bad at gaming meme got old quick.
If this'll be anything like the mlc->tlc switch we'll see minor cost savings at massive reliability losses. Today's bottom tier 40TBW SSDs are bad enough already. After the 840 (EVO) i'd be wary of first-gen QLC devices too
Alright, so on a budget, what mobo and processor should I get (ryzen) to upgrade from my i5 6500?
Probably the 2600X, should give you about +20% single-threaded performance and significantly higher multi-threaded performance, almost 2x. Pair it with pretty much any X470 motherboard and you're good to go! I'm currently looking at the ASRock X470 Gaming K4 cuz it's got one of those cute little LED debug modules, but pretty much every X470 AM4 motherboard out right now is straight quality. I'd lean towards ASUS or ASRock though.
I went from i5 6500 to R 1700 a while back, and couldn't be happier (although games are lower priority than workstation tasks for me; I basically didn't want regression in gaming). Based on current R+ lineup though, you would probably be looking for a 2600X. I have an ASRock AB350M Pro4, but honestly this was a mistake, as my RAM is not stable at more than 2400 (it's 3000 RAM, and should be compatible with my processor). If you are only running RAM at < 2400, this is a good, affordable mobo. If you want fast RAM (and Ryzen performance does scale with RAM) then bump up to an X470.
I have the same board in one of my systems, I'd also recommend avoiding it. I have intermittent stalls w/ linux under certain workloads that have been extremely hard to track down.
Is there a good microATX (or itx) mobo for Ryzen 2 yet?
AFAIK there is no such thing as a Ryzen 2 mobo. Mine is micro ATX, I have a 1700 in it, but I could put a 2700X in it as well. For older boards you may need to upgrade the BIOS though.
Ryzen 2 boards have 400 series chipsets, Ryzen 1 boards have 300 series chipsets.
https://pcpartpicker.com/products/motherboard/#c=132&xcx=0&f=7,8 there are the currently availible 400 series mini itx boards.
Ok I get what he meant now. Still valid I think, as the X370 or whatever is fine if you don't need 470 features; has a wider selection of models available; and I've heard AMD will lend you an R3 via post to perform the BIOS upgrade.
As long as the budget permits, I strongly think that X470 is the only acceptable Ryzen 2 chipset. So many boards with lower tier chipsets have massive stability issues. And you lose out on great features like XFR2 which arguably makes OCing obsolete for most use cases, as well as StoreMI which I've heard can work amazingly well.
needing X470 for PB2 or XFR2 is very vague. Doesn't seem to be chipset specific. X470 though seems to have more specific support for it with PBO. But go for X470 simply because it's a more mature revision of the chipset, X370 was/is rocky. But XFR2 performance will depend on the power delivery, which x470 typically will be better with.
B450 boards are getting released right now. They will probably be a better option for budget builds.
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